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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of July 29, 2014

Title 26: Internal Revenue
PART 1—INCOME TAXES


§1.46-6   Limitation in case of certain regulated companies.

(a) In general—(1) Scope of section. This section does not reflect amendments made to section 46 after enactment of the Revenue Act of 1971, other than the redesignation of section 46(e) as section 46(f) by the Tax Reduction Act of 1975.

(2) Disallowance of credit. Under section 46(f), a credit otherwise allowable under section 38 (“credit”) will be disallowed in certain cases with respect to “section 46(f) property” as defined in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. Paragraph (f) of this section describes circumstances under which a determination put into effect by a regulatory body will result in the disallowance of the credit. Such a determination will result in a disallowance only if section 46(f) (1) or (2) applies to such property and such determination affects the taxpayer's cost of service or rate base in a manner inconsistent with section 46(f) (1) or (2) (whichever is applicable).

(3) General rules. The provisions of section 46(f) (1) and (2) are limitations on the treatment of the credit for ratemaking purposes and for purposes of the taxpayer's regulated books of account only. Under the provisions of section 46(f)(1), the credit may not be flowed through to income (i.e., used to reduce taxpayer's cost of service) but in certain circumstances may be used to reduce rate base (provided that such reduction is restored not less rapidly than ratably). If an election is made under section 46(f)(2), the credit may be flowed through to income (but not more rapidly than ratably) and there may not be any reduction in rate base. If an election is made under section 46(f)(3), none of the limitations of section 46(f) (1) or (2) apply to certain section 46(f) property of the taxpayer. Thus, under the provisions of section 46(f)(3), no credit is disallowed if the credit is treated in any manner for ratemaking purposes, including any manner of treatment permitted under the limitations of section 46(f) (1) or (2).

(4) Elections. For rules relating to the manner of making, on or before March 9, 1972, the three elections listed in section 46(f) (1), (2), and (3), see 26 CFR 12.3. For rules relating to the application of such elections, see paragraph (h) of this section.

(5) Cross references. For rules with respect to the treatment of corporate reorganizations, asset acquisitions, and taxpayers subject to the jurisdiction of more than one regulatory body, etc., see paragraph (j) of this section.

(6) Nonapplication of prior law. Under section 105 (e) of the Revenue Act of 1971, section 203 (e) of the Revenue Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 35, does not apply to section 46(f) property.

(b) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:

(1) Section 46(f) property. “Section 46(f) property” is property described in section 50 that is—

(i) Public utility property within the meaning of section 46(c)(3)(B) (other than nonregulated communication property described in §1.46-3(g)(2)(iv)) or

(ii) Property used predominantly in the trade or business of the furnishing or sale of steam through a local distribution system or of the transportation of gas or steam by pipeline, if the rates for the trade or business are regulated within the meaning of §1.46-3(g)(2)(iii).

For purposes of determining whether property is used predominantly in the trade or business of transportation of gas by pipeline (or of transportation of gas by pipeline and of furnishing or sale of gas through a local distribution system), the rules prescribed in §1.46-3(g)(4) apply except that accounts 365 through 371 inclusive (Transmission Plant) are added to the accounts listed in §1.46-3(g)(4)(i).

(2) Cost of service. (i)(A) For purposes of this section, “cost of service” is the amount required by a taxpayer to provide regulated goods or services. Cost of service includes operating expenses (including salaries, cost of materials, etc.) maintenance expenses, depreciation expenses, tax expenses, and interest expenses. For purposes of this section, any effect on a taxpayer's permitted return on investment that results from a reduction in the taxpayer's rate base does not constitute a reduction in cost of service, even though, as a technical ratemaking term, “cost of service” ordinarily includes a permitted return on investment. In addition, taking into account a deduction for the additional interest that the taxpayer would pay or accrue if the credit were unavailable in determining Federal income tax expense (“synchronization of interest”) does not constitute a reduction in cost of service for purposes of section 46(f)(2). This adjustment to Federal income tax expense may be taken into account in determining cost of service for the regulated accounting period or periods that include the taxable year to which the adjustment relates or for any subsequent regulated accounting period.

(B) See paragraph (b)(3)(ii)(B) of this section for rules relating to the amount of additional interest that the taxpayer would pay or accrue if the credit were unavailable.

(ii) In determining whether, or to what extent, a credit has been used to reduce cost of service, reference shall be made to any accounting treatment that affects cost of service. Examples of such treatment include reducing by all or a portion of the credit the amount of Federal income tax expense taken into account for ratemaking purposes and reducing the depreciable bases of property by all or a portion of the credit for ratemaking purposes.

(3) Rate base. (i) For purposes of this section, “rate base” is the monetary amount that is multiplied by a rate of return to determine the permitted return on investment.

(ii)(A) In determining whether, or to what extent, a credit has been used to reduce rate base, reference shall be made to any accounting treatment that affects rate base. In addition, in those cases in which the rate of return is based on the taxpayer's cost of capital, reference shall be made to any accounting treatment that reduces the permitted return on investment by treating the credit less favorably than the capital that would have been provided if the credit were unavailable. Thus, the credit may not be assigned a “cost of capital” rate that is less than the overall cost of capital rate, determined on the basis of a weighted average, for the capital that would have been provided if the credit were unavailable.

(B) For purposes of determining the cost of capital rate assigned to the credit and the amount of additional interest that the taxpayer would pay or accrue, the composition of the capital that would have been provided if the credit were unavailable may be determined—

(1) On the basis of all the relevant facts and circumstances; or

(2) By assuming for both such purposes that such capital would be provided solely by common shareholders, preferred shareholders, and long-term creditors in the same proportions and at the same rates of return as the capital actually provided to the taxpayer by such shareholders and creditors.

For purposes of this section, capital provided by long-term creditors does not include deferred taxes as described in section 167(e)(3)(G) or 168(e)(3)(B)(ii).

(C) If a taxpayer's overall rate of return is based on a deemed or hypothetical capital structure, paragraph (b)(3)(ii)(B) of this section shall be applied by treating the deemed or hypothetical capital as if it were the capital actually provided to the taxpayer and determining the composition of the capital that would have been provided if the credit were unavailable in a manner consistent with such treatment.

(iii) Whether, or to what extent, a credit has been used to reduce rate base for any period to which pre-June 23, 1986 rates apply will be determined under 26 CFR 1.46-6(b) (3) and (4) (revised as of April 1, 1985) if such a determination avoids disallowance of a credit that would be disallowed under paragraph (b)(3)(ii) or (4)(ii) of this section. For this purpose, a period of which pre-June 23, 1986 rates apply is any period for which the effect of the credit on rate base for ratemaking purposes is established under a determination put into effect (within the meaning of paragraph (f) of this section) before June 23, 1986.

(4) Indirect reductions to cost of service or rate base. (i) Cost of service or rate base is also considered to have been reduced by reason of all or a portion of a credit if such reduction is made in an indirect manner.

(ii) One type of such indirect reduction is any ratemaking decision in which the credit is treated as operating income (subject to ratemaking regulation) or is treated less favorably than the capital that would have been provided if the credit were unavailable. For example, if the credit is accounted for as nonoperating income on a company's regulated books of account but a ratemaking decision has the effect of treating the credit as operating income in determining rate of return to common shareholders, then cost of service has been indirectly reduced by reason of the credit.

(iii) A second type of indirect reduction is any ratemaking decision intended to achieve an effect similar to a direct reduction to cost of service or rate base. In determining whether a ratemaking decision is intended to achieve this effect, consideration is given to all the relevant facts and circumstances of each case, including, but not limited to—

(A) The record of the proceeding,

(B) The regulatory body's orders or opinions (including any dissenting views), and

(C) The anticipated effect of the ratemaking decision on the company's revenues in comparison to a direct reduction to cost of service or rate base by reason of the investment tax credits available to the regulated company.

(iv) This paragraph (b)(4)(iv) describes a situation that is not an indirect reduction to cost of service or rate base by reason of all or a portion of a credit. The ratemaking treatment of credits may affect the financial condition of a company, including the company's ability to attract new capital, the cost of that capital, the company's future financial requirements, the market price of the company's securities, and the degree of risk attributable to investment in those securities. The financial condition may be reflected in certain customary financial indicators such as the comparative capital structure of the company, coverage ratios, price/earnings ratios, and price/book ratios. Under the facts and circumstances test of paragraph (b)(4)(iii) of this section, the consideration of a company's financial condition by a regulatory body is not an indirect reduction to cost of service or rate base, even though such condition, as affected by the ratemaking treatment of the company's investment tax credits, is considered in the development of a reasonable rate of return on common shareholders' investment.

(c) General rule—(1) In general. Section 46(f)(1) applies to all of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property except property to which an election under section 46(f) (2) or (3) applies. Under section 46(f)(1), the credit for the taxpayer's section 46(f) property will be disallowed if—

(i) The taxpayer's cost of service for ratemaking purposes is reduced by reason of any portion of such credit, or

(ii) The taxpayer's rate base is reduced by reason of any portion of the credit and such reduction in rate base is not restored or is restored less rapidly than ratably within the meaning of paragraph (g) of this section.

(2) Insufficient natural domestic supply. The provisions of paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section shall not apply to permit any reduction in taxpayer's rate base with respect to its “short supply property” if it made an election under the last sentence of section 46(f)(1) on or before March 9, 1972.

(3) Short supply property. For purposes of this section, section 46(f) property is “short supply property” if—

(i) The property is described in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section,

(ii) The regulatory body described in section 46(c)(3)(B) that has jurisdiction for ratemaking purposes with respect to such trade or business is an agency or instrumentality of the United States, and

(iii) This regulatory body makes a short supply determination and the determination is in effect on the date such property is placed in service.

(4) Short supply determination. A short supply determination is made or revoked on the date of its publication in the Federal Register. It is a determination that the natural domestic supply of gas or steam is insufficient to meet the present and future requirements of the domestic economy.

(5) Dates short supply determination in effect. (i) A short supply determination is considered to be in effect with respect to section 46(f) property placed in service at any time before the determination is revoked. However, a short supply determination made after June 20, 1979 is not considered to be in effect with respect to section 46(f) property placed in service before such determination was made.

(d) Special rule for ratable flow-through. If an election was made under section 46(f)(2) on or before March 9, 1972, section 46(f)(2) applies to all of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property except property to which an election under section 46(f)(3) applies. Under section 46(f)(2), the credit for the taxpayer's section 46(f) property will be disallowed if—

(1) The taxpayer's cost of service, for ratemaking purposes or in its regulated books of account, is reduced by more than a ratable portion of such credit within the meaning of paragraph (g) of this section or

(2) The taxpayer's rate base is reduced by reason of any portion of such credit.

(e) Flow-through property. If a taxpayer made an election under section 46(f)(3) on or before March 9, 1972, section 46(f) (1) and (2) do not apply to the taxpayer's section 46(f) property to which section 167(l)(2)(C) applies. In the case of an election under section 46(f)(3), a credit will not be disallowed, notwithstanding a determination by a regulatory body having jurisdiction over such taxpayer that reduces the taxpayer's cost of service or rate base by reason of such credit. In general, section 167(l)(2)(C) applies to property with respect to which a taxpayer may use a flow-through method of accounting (within the meaning of section 167(l)(3)(H)) to take into account the allowance for depreciation under section 167(a). Section 167(l)(2)(C) applies to property even though the taxpayer does not use a flow-through method of accounting with respect to the property. Section 167(l)(2)(C) does not apply to property if the taxpayer can not use a flow-through method of accounting with respect to the property. For example, section 167(l)(2)(C) does not apply to property with respect to which an election under section 167(l)(4)(A) applies. Thus, such property does not qualify for an election under section 46(f)(3).

(f) Limitations—(1) In general. This paragraph provides rules relating to limitations on the disallowance of credits under section 46(f)(4). Key terms are defined in paragraphs (f) (7), (8), and (9) of this section.

(2) Disallowance postponed. There is no disallowance of a credit before the first final inconsistent determination is put into effect for the taxpayer's section 46(f) property.

(3) Time of disallowance. A credit is disallowed—

(i) When the first final inconsistent determination is put into effect and

(ii) When any inconsistent determination (whether or not final) is put into effect after the first final inconsistent determination is put into effect.

(4) Credits disallowed. A credit is disallowed for section 46(f) property placed in service (within the meaning of §1.46-3(d)) by the taxpayer—

(i) Before the date any inconsistent determination described in paragraph (f)(2) of this section is put into effect and

(ii) On or after such date and before the date a subsequent consistent determination (whether or not final) is put into effect.

(5) Barred years. No amount of credit for a taxable year is disallowed under paragraph (f)(3) of this section if, for such year, assessment of a deficiency is barred by any law or rule of law.

(6) Notification and other requirements. The taxpayer shall notify the district director of a disallowance of a credit under paragraph (f)(3) of this section within 30 days of the date that the applicable determination is put into effect. In the case of such a disallowance, the taxpayer shall recompute its tax liability for any affected taxable year, and such recomputation shall be made in the form of an amended return where necessary.

(7) Determinations. For purposes of this paragraph, the term “determination” refers to a determination made with respect to section 46(f) property (other than property to which an election under section 46(f)(3) applies) by a regulatory body described in section 46(c)(3)(B) that determines the effect of the credit—

(i) For purposes of section 46(f)(1), on the taxpayer's cost of service or rate base for ratemaking purposes or

(ii) In the case of a taxpayer that made an election under section 46(f)(2), on the taxpayer's cost of service, for ratemaking purposes or in its regulated books of account, or on the taxpayer's rate base for ratemaking purposes.

A regulatory body does not have to take affirmative action to make a determination. Thus, a regulatory body's failure to take action on a rate schedule filed by a taxpayer is a determination if the rates can be put into effect without further action by the regulatory body.

(8) Types of determinations. For purposes of this paragraph—

(i) The term “inconsistent” refers to a determination that is inconsistent with section 46(f) (1) or (2) (as the case may be). Thus, for example, a determination to reduce the taxpayer's cost of service by more than a ratable portion of the credit would be a determination that is inconsistent with section 46(f)(2). As a further example, such a determination would also be inconsistent if section 46(f)(1) applied because no reduction in cost of service is permitted under section 46(f)(1).

(ii) The term “consistent” refers to a determination that is consistent with section 46(f) (1) or (2) (as the case may be).

(iii) The term “final determination” means a determination with respect to which all rights to appeal or to request a review, a rehearing, or a redetermination have been exhausted or have lapsed.

(iv) The term “first final inconsistent determination” means the first final determination put into effect after December 10, 1971, that is inconsistent with section 46(f) (1) or (2) (as the case may be).

(9) Put into effect. A determination is put into effect on the latter of—

(i) The date it is issued (or, if a first final inconsistent determination, the date it becomes final) or

(ii) The date it becomes operative.

(10) Examples. The provisions of this paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1. Corporation X, a calendar-year taxpayer engaged in a public utility activity is subject to the jurisdiction of regulatory body A. On September 15, 1971, X purchases section 46(f) property and places it in service on that date. For 1971, X takes the credit allowable by section 38 with respect to such property. X does not make any election permitted by section 46(f). On October 9, 1972, A makes a determination that X must account for the credit allowable under section 38 in a manner inconsistent with section 46(f)(1). The determination, which was the first determination by A after December 10, 1971, becomes final on January 1, 1973, and holds that X must retroactively adjust the manner in which it accounted for the credit allowable under section 38 starting with the taxable year that began on January 1, 1972. Since, under the provisions of paragraph (f)(8) of this section, the determination by A is put into effect on January 1, 1973 (the date it becomes final), the credit is retroactively disallowed with respect to any of X's section 46(f) property placed in service before January 1, 1973, on any date which occurs during a taxable year with respect to which an assessment of a deficiency has not been barred by any law or rule of law. In addition, the credit is disallowed with respect to X's section 46(f) property placed in service on or after January 1, 1973, and before the date that a subsequent determination by A, which as to X is consistent with section 46(f)(1), is put into effect. Thus, X must amend its income tax return for 1971 to reflect the retroactive disallowance of the credit otherwise allowable under section 38 with respect to the section 46(f) property placed in service on September 15, 1971.

Example 2. The facts are the same as in example 1, except that the first inconsistent determination by A becomes final on April 5, 1972, and requires X to account for the credit for all taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 1973, in a manner inconsistent with section 46(f)(1). Under the provisions of paragraph (f)(8) of this section, the determination was put into effect on January 1, 1973 (the date it became operative). The result is the same as in example 1.

Example 3. The facts are the same as in example 1, except that on June 1, 1975, A issues a determination that X shall retroactively account for the credit allowable by section 38 in a manner consistent with the provisions of section 46(f)(1) for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 1971. The determination becomes final on January 5, 1976, in the same form as originally issued. The result is the same as in example 1 with respect to property X places in service before June 1, 1975. The credit is allowed with respect to property X places in service on or after June 1, 1975 (the date that the consistent determination is put into effect).

(g) Ratable methods—(1) In general. Under this paragraph (g), rules are prescribed for purposes of determining whether or not, under section 46(f)(1), a reduction in the taxpayer's rate base with respect to the credit is restored less rapidly than ratably and whether or not under section 46(f)(2) the taxpayer's cost of service for ratemaking purposes is reduced by more than a ratable portion of such credit.

(2) Regulated depreciation expense. What is “ratable” is determined by considering the period of time actually used in computing the taxpayer's regulated depreciation expense for the property for which a credit is allowed. “Regulated depreciation expense” is the depreciation expense for the property used by a regulatory body for purposes of establishing the taxpayer's cost of service for ratemaking purposes. Such period of time shall be expressed in units of years (or shorter periods), units of production, or machine hours and shall be determined in accordance with the individual useful life system or composite (or other group asset) account system actually used in computing the taxpayer's regulated depreciation expense. A method of restoring, or reducing, is ratable if the amount to be restored to rate base, or to reduce cost of service (as the case may be), is allocated ratably in proportion to the number of such units. Thus, for example, assume that the regulated depreciation expense is computed under the straight line method by applying a composite annual percentage rate to “original cost” (as defined for purposes of computing regulated depreciation expense). If, with respect to an item of section 46(f) property, the amount to be restored annually to rate base is computed by applying a composite annual percentage rate to the amount by which the rate base was reduced, then the restoration is ratable. Similarly, if cost of service is reduced annually by an amount computed by applying a composite annual percentage rate to the amount of the credit, cost of service is reduced by a ratable portion. If such composite annual percenage rate were revised for purposes of computing regulated depreciation expense beginning with a particular accounting period, the computation of ratable restoration or ratable portion (as the case may be) must also be revised beginning with such period. A composite annual percentage rate is determined solely by reference to the period of time actually used by the taxpayer in computing its regulated depreciation expense without reduction for salvage or other items such as over and under accruals. A composite annual percentage rate determined by taking into account salvage value or other items shall be considered to be ratable in the case of a determination (whether or not final) issued before March 22, 1979, and any rate order (whether or not final) that is entered into before June 20, 1979, in response to a rate case filed before April 23, 1979. For this purpose, the term “rate order” does not include an order by a regulatory body that perfunctorily adopts rates as filed if such rates are suspended or subject to rebate.

(h) Elections—(1) Applicability of elections. (i) Any election under section 46(f) applies to all of the taxpayer's property eligible for the election, whether or not the taxpayer is regulated by more than one regulatory body.

(ii) Section 46(f)(1) applies to all of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property in the absence of an election under either section 46(f) (2) or (3). If an election is made under section 46(f)(2), section 46(f)(1) does not apply to any of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property.

(iii) An election made under the last sentence of section 46(f)(1) applies to that portion of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property to which section 46(f)(1) applies and which is short supply property within the meaning of paragraph (c)(2) of this section.

(iv) If a taxpayer makes an election under section 46(f)(2) and makes no election under section 46(f)(3), the election under section 46(f)(2) applies to all of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property.

(v) If a taxpayer makes an election under section 46(f)(3), such election applies to all of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property to which section 167(l)(2)(C) applies. Section 46(f) (1) or (2) (as the case may be) applies to that portion of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property that is not property to which section 167(f)(2)(C) applies. Thus, for example, if a taxpayer makes an election under section 46(f)(2) and also makes an election under section 46(f)(3), section 46(f)(3) applies to all of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property to which section 167(l)(2)(C) applies, and section 46(f)(2) applies to the remainder of the taxpayer's section 46(f) property.

(2) Method of making elections. See 26 CFR 12.3 for rules relating to the method of making the elections described in section 46(f) (1), (2), or (3).

(i) [Reserved]

(j) Reorganizations, asset acquisitions, multiple regulation, etc.—(1) Taxpayers not entirely subject to jurisdiction of one regulatory body. (i) If a taxpayer is required by a regulatory body having jurisdiction over less than all of its property to account for the credit under a determination that is inconsistent with section 46(f) (1) or (2) (as the case may be), such credit shall be disallowed only with respect to property subject to the jurisdiction of such regulatory body.

(ii) For purposes of this paragraph (j), a regulatory body is considered to have jurisdiction over property of a taxpayer if the property is included in the rate base for which the regulatory body determines an allowable rate of return for ratemaking purposes or if expenses with respect to the property are included in cost of service as determined by the regulatory body for ratemaking purposes. For example, if regulatory body A, having jurisdiction over 60 percent of an item of corporation X's section 46(f) property, makes a determination which is inconsistent with section 46(f), and if regulatory body B, having jurisdiction over the remaining 40 percent of such item of property, makes a consistent determination (or if the remaining 40 percent is not subject to the jurisdiction of any regulatory body), then 60 percent of the credit for such item will be disallowed. For a further example, if regulatory body A, having jurisdiction over 60 percent of X's section 46(f) property, has jurisdiction over 100 percent of a particular generator, 100 percent of the credit for such generator will be disallowed.

(iii) For rules which provide that the 3 elections under section 46(f) may not be made with respect to less than all of the taxpayer's property eligible for the election, see paragraph (h)(1)(i) of this section.

(2) [Reserved]

(k) Treatment of accumulated deferred investment tax credits upon the deregulation of public utility property—(1) Scope—(i) In general. This paragraph (k) provides rules for the application of former sections 46(f)(1) and 46(f)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code to a taxpayer with respect to public utility property that ceases, whether by disposition, deregulation, or otherwise, to be public utility property with respect to the taxpayer and that is not described in paragraph (k)(1)(ii) of this section (deregulated public utility property).

(ii) Exception. This paragraph (k) does not apply to property that ceases to be public utility property with respect to the taxpayer on account of an ordinary retirement within the meaning of §1.167(a)-11(d)(3)(ii).

(2) Ratable amount—(i) Restoration of rate base reduction. A reduction in the taxpayer's rate base on account of the credit with respect to public utility property that becomes deregulated public utility property is restored ratably during the period after the property becomes deregulated public utility property if the amount of the reduction remaining to be restored does not, at any time during the period, exceed the restoration percentage of the recoverable stranded cost of the property at such time. For this purpose—

(A) The stranded cost of the property is the cost of the property reduced by the amount of such cost that the taxpayer has recovered through regulated depreciation expense during the period before the property becomes deregulated public utility property;

(B) The recoverable stranded cost of the property at any time is the stranded cost of the property that the taxpayer will be permitted to recover through rates after such time; and

(C) The restoration percentage for the property is determined by dividing the reduction in rate base remaining to be restored with respect to the property immediately before the property becomes deregulated public utility property by the stranded cost of the property.

(ii) Cost of service reduction. Reductions in the taxpayer's cost of service on account of the credit with respect to public utility property that becomes deregulated public utility property are ratable during the period after the property becomes deregulated public utility property if the cumulative amount of the reduction during such period does not, at any time during the period, exceed the flowthrough percentage of the cumulative stranded cost recovery for the property at such time. For this purpose—

(A) The stranded cost of the property is the cost of the property reduced by the amount of such cost that the taxpayer has recovered through regulated depreciation expense during the period before the property becomes deregulated public utility property;

(B) The cumulative stranded cost recovery for the property at any time is the stranded cost of the property that the taxpayer has been permitted to recover through rates on or before such time; and

(C) The flowthrough percentage for the property is determined by dividing the amount of credit with respect to the property remaining to be used to reduce cost of service immediately before the property becomes deregulated public utility property by the stranded cost of the property.

(3) Cross reference. See §1.168(i)-(3) for rules relating to the treatment of balances of excess deferred income taxes when public utility property becomes deregulated public utility property.

(4) Effective/applicability dates—(i) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (k)(4)(ii) of this section, this paragraph (k) applies to public utility property that becomes deregulated public utility property with respect to a taxpayer after December 21, 2005.

(ii) Property that becomes public utility property of the transferee. This paragraph (k) does not apply to property that becomes deregulated public utility property with respect to a taxpayer an account of a transfer on or before March 20, 2008 if after the transfer the property is public utility property of the transferee.

(iii) Application of regulation project (REG-104385-01). A reduction in the taxpayer's cost of service will be treated as ratable if it is consistent with the proposed rules in regulation project (REG-104385-01) (68 FR 10190) March 4, 2003, and occurs during the period beginning on March 5, 2003, and ending on the earlier of—

(A) The last date on which the utility's rates are determined under the rate order in effect on December 21, 2005; or

(B) December 21, 2007.

[T.D. 7602, 44 FR 17668, Mar. 23, 1979, as amended by T.D. 8089, 51 FR 18777, May 22, 1986; T.D. 9387, 73 FR 14936, Mar. 20, 2008; 73 FR 18708, Apr. 7, 2008]



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