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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 22, 2014

Title 12: Banks and Banking
PART 222—FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V)
Subpart H—Duties of Users Regarding Risk-Based Pricing


§222.74   Exceptions.

(a) Application for specific terms—(1) In general. A person is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to the consumer under §222.72(a) or (c) if the consumer applies for specific material terms and is granted those terms, unless those terms were specified by the person using a consumer report after the consumer applied for or requested credit and after the person obtained the consumer report. For purposes of this section, “specific material terms” means a single material term, or set of material terms, such as an annual percentage rate of 10 percent, and not a range of alternatives, such as an annual percentage rate that may be 8, 10, or 12 percent, or between 8 and 12 percent.

(2) Example. A consumer receives a firm offer of credit from a credit card issuer. The terms of the firm offer are based in whole or in part on information from a consumer report that the credit card issuer obtained under the FCRA's firm offer of credit provisions. The solicitation offers the consumer a credit card with a single purchase annual percentage rate of 12 percent. The consumer applies for and receives a credit card with an annual percentage rate of 12 percent. Other customers with the same credit card have a purchase annual percentage rate of 10 percent. The exception applies because the consumer applied for specific material terms and was granted those terms. Although the credit card issuer specified the annual percentage rate in the firm offer of credit based in whole or in part on a consumer report, the credit card issuer specified that material term before, not after, the consumer applied for or requested credit.

(b) Adverse action notice. A person is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to the consumer under §222.72(a), (c), or (d) if the person provides an adverse action notice to the consumer under section 615(a) of the FCRA.

(c) Prescreened solicitations—(1) In general. A person is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to the consumer under §222.72(a) or (c) if the person:

(i) Obtains a consumer report that is a prescreened list as described in section 604(c)(2) of the FCRA; and

(ii) Uses the consumer report for the purpose of making a firm offer of credit to the consumer.

(2) More favorable material terms. This exception applies to any firm offer of credit offered by a person to a consumer, even if the person makes other firm offers of credit to other consumers on more favorable material terms.

(3) Example. A credit card issuer obtains two prescreened lists from a consumer reporting agency. One list includes consumers with high credit scores. The other list includes consumers with low credit scores. The issuer mails a firm offer of credit to the high credit score consumers with a single purchase annual percentage rate of 10 percent. The issuer also mails a firm offer of credit to the low credit score consumers with a single purchase annual percentage rate of 14 percent. The credit card issuer is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to the low credit score consumers who receive the 14 percent offer because use of a consumer report to make a firm offer of credit does not trigger the risk-based pricing notice requirement.

(d) Loans secured by residential real property—credit score disclosure. (1) In general. A person is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to a consumer under §222.72(a) or (c) if:

(i) The consumer requests from the person an extension of credit that is or will be secured by one to four units of residential real property; and

(ii) The person provides to each consumer described in paragraph (d)(1)(i) of this section a notice that contains the following—

(A) A statement that a consumer report (or credit report) is a record of the consumer's credit history and includes information about whether the consumer pays his or her obligations on time and how much the consumer owes to creditors;

(B) A statement that a credit score is a number that takes into account information in a consumer report and that a credit score can change over time to reflect changes in the consumer's credit history;

(C) A statement that the consumer's credit score can affect whether the consumer can obtain credit and what the cost of that credit will be;

(D) The information required to be disclosed to the consumer pursuant to section 609(g) of the FCRA;

(E) The distribution of credit scores among consumers who are scored under the same scoring model that is used to generate the consumer's credit score using the same scale as that of the credit score that is provided to the consumer, presented in the form of a bar graph containing a minimum of six bars that illustrates the percentage of consumers with credit scores within the range of scores reflected in each bar or by other clear and readily understandable graphical means, or a clear and readily understandable statement informing the consumer how his or her credit score compares to the scores of other consumers. Use of a graph or statement obtained from the person providing the credit score that meets the requirements of this paragraph (d)(1)(ii)(E) is deemed to comply with this requirement;

(F) A statement that the consumer is encouraged to verify the accuracy of the information contained in the consumer report and has the right to dispute any inaccurate information in the report;

(G) A statement that federal law gives the consumer the right to obtain copies of his or her consumer reports directly from the consumer reporting agencies, including a free report from each of the nationwide consumer reporting agencies once during any 12-month period;

(H) Contact information for the centralized source from which consumers may obtain their free annual consumer reports; and

(I) A statement directing consumers to the Web sites of the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Trade Commission to obtain more information about consumer reports.

(2) Form of the notice. The notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section must be:

(i) Clear and conspicuous;

(ii) Provided on or with the notice required by section 609(g) of the FCRA;

(iii) Segregated from other information provided to the consumer, except for the notice required by section 609(g) of the FCRA; and

(iv) Provided to the consumer in writing and in a form that the consumer may keep.

(3) Timing. The notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section must be provided to the consumer at the time the disclosure required by section 609(g) of the FCRA is provided to the consumer, but in any event at or before consummation in the case of closed-end credit or before the first transaction is made under an open-end credit plan.

(4) Multiple credit scores—(i) In General. When a person obtains two or more credit scores from consumer reporting agencies and uses one of those credit scores in setting the material terms of credit granted, extended, or otherwise provided to a consumer, for example, by using the low, middle, high, or most recent score, the notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section must include that credit score and the other information required by that paragraph. When a person obtains two or more credit scores from consumer reporting agencies and uses multiple credit scores in setting the material terms of credit granted, extended, or otherwise provided to a consumer, for example, by computing the average of all the credit scores obtained, the notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section must include one of those credit scores and the other information required by that paragraph. The notice may, at the person's option, include more than one credit score, along with the additional information specified in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section for each credit score disclosed.

(ii) Examples. (A) A person that uses consumer reports to set the material terms of mortgage credit granted, extended, or provided to consumers regularly requests credit scores from several consumer reporting agencies and uses the low score when determining the material terms it will offer to the consumer. That person must disclose the low score in the notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section.

(B) A person that uses consumer reports to set the material terms of mortgage credit granted, extended, or provided to consumers regularly requests credit scores from several consumer reporting agencies, each of which it uses in an underwriting program in order to determine the material terms it will offer to the consumer. That person may choose one of these scores to include in the notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section.

(5) Model form. A model form of the notice described in paragraph (d)(1)(ii) of this section consolidated with the notice required by section 609(g) of the FCRA is contained in Appendix H-3 of this part. Appropriate use of Model Form H-3 is deemed to comply with the requirements of §222.74(d). Use of the model form is optional.

(e) Other extensions of credit—credit score disclosure—(1) In general. A person is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to a consumer under §222.72(a) or (c) if:

(i) The consumer requests from the person an extension of credit other than credit that is or will be secured by one to four units of residential real property; and

(ii) The person provides to each consumer described in paragraph (e)(1)(i) of this section a notice that contains the following—

(A) A statement that a consumer report (or credit report) is a record of the consumer's credit history and includes information about whether the consumer pays his or her obligations on time and how much the consumer owes to creditors;

(B) A statement that a credit score is a number that takes into account information in a consumer report and that a credit score can change over time to reflect changes in the consumer's credit history;

(C) A statement that the consumer's credit score can affect whether the consumer can obtain credit and what the cost of that credit will be;

(D) The current credit score of the consumer or the most recent credit score of the consumer that was previously calculated by the consumer reporting agency for a purpose related to the extension of credit;

(E) The range of possible credit scores under the model used to generate the credit score;

(F) The distribution of credit scores among consumers who are scored under the same scoring model that is used to generate the consumer's credit score using the same scale as that of the credit score that is provided to the consumer, presented in the form of a bar graph containing a minimum of six bars that illustrates the percentage of consumers with credit scores within the range of scores reflected in each bar, or by other clear and readily understandable graphical means, or a clear and readily understandable statement informing the consumer how his or her credit score compares to the scores of other consumers. Use of a graph or statement obtained from the person providing the credit score that meets the requirements of this paragraph (e)(1)(ii)(F) is deemed to comply with this requirement;

(G) The date on which the credit score was created;

(H) The name of the consumer reporting agency or other person that provided the credit score;

(I) A statement that the consumer is encouraged to verify the accuracy of the information contained in the consumer report and has the right to dispute any inaccurate information in the report;

(J) A statement that federal law gives the consumer the right to obtain copies of his or her consumer reports directly from the consumer reporting agencies, including a free report from each of the nationwide consumer reporting agencies once during any 12-month period;

(K) Contact information for the centralized source from which consumers may obtain their free annual consumer reports; and

(L) A statement directing consumers to the web sites of the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Trade Commission to obtain more information about consumer reports.

(2) Form of the notice. The notice described in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section must be:

(i) Clear and conspicuous;

(ii) Segregated from other information provided to the consumer; and

(iii) Provided to the consumer in writing and in a form that the consumer may keep.

(3) Timing. The notice described in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section must be provided to the consumer as soon as reasonably practicable after the credit score has been obtained, but in any event at or before consummation in the case of closed-end credit or before the first transaction is made under an open-end credit plan.

(4) Multiple credit scores—(i) In General. When a person obtains two or more credit scores from consumer reporting agencies and uses one of those credit scores in setting the material terms of credit granted, extended, or otherwise provided to a consumer, for example, by using the low, middle, high, or most recent score, the notice described in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section must include that credit score and the other information required by that paragraph. When a person obtains two or more credit scores from consumer reporting agencies and uses multiple credit scores in setting the material terms of credit granted, extended, or otherwise provided to a consumer, for example, by computing the average of all the credit scores obtained, the notice described in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section must include one of those credit scores and the other information required by that paragraph. The notice may, at the person's option, include more than one credit score, along with the additional information specified in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section for each credit score disclosed.

(ii) Examples. The manner in which multiple credit scores are to be disclosed under this section are substantially identical to the manner set forth in the examples contained in paragraph (d)(4)(ii) of this section.

(5) Model form. A model form of the notice described in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section is contained in Appendix H-4 of this part. Appropriate use of Model Form H-4 is deemed to comply with the requirements of §222.74(e). Use of the model form is optional.

(f) Credit score not available—(1) In general. A person is not required to provide a risk-based pricing notice to a consumer under §222.72(a) or (c) if the person:

(i) Regularly obtains credit scores from a consumer reporting agency and provides credit score disclosures to consumers in accordance with paragraphs (d) or (e) of this section, but a credit score is not available from the consumer reporting agency from which the person regularly obtains credit scores for a consumer to whom the person grants, extends, or provides credit;

(ii) Does not obtain a credit score from another consumer reporting agency in connection with granting, extending, or providing credit to the consumer; and

(iii) Provides to the consumer a notice that contains the following—

(A) A statement that a consumer report (or credit report) includes information about the consumer's credit history and the type of information included in that history;

(B) A statement that a credit score is a number that takes into account information in a consumer report and that a credit score can change over time in response to changes in the consumer's credit history;

(C) A statement that credit scores are important because consumers with higher credit scores generally obtain more favorable credit terms;

(D) A statement that not having a credit score can affect whether the consumer can obtain credit and what the cost of that credit will be;

(E) A statement that a credit score about the consumer was not available from a consumer reporting agency, which must be identified by name, generally due to insufficient information regarding the consumer's credit history;

(F) A statement that the consumer is encouraged to verify the accuracy of the information contained in the consumer report and has the right to dispute any inaccurate information in the consumer report;

(G) A statement that federal law gives the consumer the right to obtain copies of his or her consumer reports directly from the consumer reporting agencies, including a free consumer report from each of the nationwide consumer reporting agencies once during any 12-month period;

(H) The contact information for the centralized source from which consumers may obtain their free annual consumer reports; and

(I) A statement directing consumers to the web sites of the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Trade Commission to obtain more information about consumer reports.

(2) Example. A person that uses consumer reports to set the material terms of non-mortgage credit granted, extended, or provided to consumers regularly requests credit scores from a particular consumer reporting agency and provides those credit scores and additional information to consumers to satisfy the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section. That consumer reporting agency provides to the person a consumer report on a particular consumer that contains one trade line, but does not provide the person with a credit score on that consumer. If the person does not obtain a credit score from another consumer reporting agency and, based in whole or in part on information in a consumer report, grants, extends, or provides credit to the consumer, the person may provide the notice described in paragraph (f)(1)(iii) of this section. If, however, the person obtains a credit score from another consumer reporting agency, the person may not rely upon the exception in paragraph (f) of this section, but may satisfy the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section.

(3) Form of the notice. The notice described in paragraph (f)(1)(iii) of this section must be:

(i) Clear and conspicuous;

(ii) Segregated from other information provided to the consumer; and

(iii) Provided to the consumer in writing and in a form that the consumer may keep.

(4) Timing. The notice described in paragraph (f)(1)(iii) of this section must be provided to the consumer as soon as reasonably practicable after the person has requested the credit score, but in any event not later than consummation of a transaction in the case of closed-end credit or when the first transaction is made under an open-end credit plan.

(5) Model form. A model form of the notice described in paragraph (f)(1)(iii) of this section is contained in Appendix H-5 of this part. Appropriate use of Model Form H-5 is deemed to comply with the requirements of §222.74(f). Use of the model form is optional.



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