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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 50: Wildlife and Fisheries
PART 17—ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS


Subpart D—Threatened Wildlife


Contents
§17.31   Prohibitions.
§17.32   Permits—general.
§17.40   Special rules—mammals.
§17.41   Special rules—birds.
§17.42   Special rules—reptiles.
§17.43   Special rules—amphibians.
§17.44   Special rules—fishes.
§17.45   Special rules—snails and clams. [Reserved]
§17.46   Special rules—crustaceans.
§17.47   Special rules—insects.
§17.48   Special rules—common sponges and other forms. [Reserved]

§17.31   Prohibitions.

(a) Except as provided in subpart A of this part, or in a permit issued under this subpart, all of the provisions in §17.21 shall apply to threatened wildlife, except §17.21(c)(5).

(b) In addition to any other provisions of this part 17, any employee or agent of the Service, of the National Marine Fisheries Service, or of a State conservation agency which is operating a conservation program pursuant to the terms of a Cooperative Agreement with the Service in accordance with section 6(c) of the Act, who is designated by his agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his official duties, take those threatened species of wildlife which are covered by an approved cooperative agreement to carry out conservation programs.

(c) Whenever a special rule in §§17.40 to 17.48 applies to a threatened species, none of the provisions of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section will apply. The special rule will contain all the applicable prohibitions and exceptions.

[43 FR 18181, Apr. 28, 1978, as amended at 44 FR 31580, May 31, 1979; 70 FR 10503, Mar. 4, 2005]

§17.32   Permits—general.

Upon receipt of a complete application the Director may issue a permit for any activity otherwise prohibited with regard to threatened wildlife. Such permit shall be governed by the provisions of this section unless a special rule applicable to the wildlife, appearing in §§17.40 to 17.48, of this part provides otherwise. Permits issued under this section must be for one of the following purposes: Scientific purposes, or the enhancement of propagation or survival, or economic hardship, or zoological exhibition, or educational purposes, or incidental taking, or special purposes consistent with the purposes of the Act. Such permits may authorize a single transaction, a series of transactions, or a number of activities over a specific period of time.

(a)(1) Application requirements for permits for scientific purposes, or the enhancement of propagation or survival, or economic hardship, or zoological exhibition, or educational purposes, or special purposes consistent with the purposes of the Act. A person wishing to get a permit for an activity prohibited by §17.31 submits an application for activities under this paragraph. The Service provides Form 3-200 for the application to which as much of the following information relating to the purpose of the permit must be attached:

(i) The Common and scientific names of the species sought to be covered by the permit, as well as the number, age, and sex of such species, and the activity sought to be authorized (such as taking, exporting, selling in interstate commerce);

(ii) A statement as to whether, at the time of application, the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit (A) is still in the wild, (B) has already been removed from the wild, or (C) was born in captivity;

(iii) A resume of the applicant's attempts to obtain the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit in a manner which would not cause the death or removal from the wild of such wildlife;

(iv) If the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit has already been removed from the wild, the country and place where such removal occurred; if the wildlife sought to be covered by permit was born in captivity, the country and place where such wildlife was born;

(v) A complete description and address of the institution or other facility where the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit will be used, displayed, or maintained;

(vi) If the applicant seeks to have live wildlife covered by the permit, a complete description, including photographs or diagrams, of the facilities to house and/or care for the wildlife and a resume of the experience of those persons who will be caring for the wildlife;

(vii) A full statement of the reasons why the applicant is justified in obtaining a permit including the details of the activities sought to be authorized by the permit;

(viii) If the application is for the purpose of enhancement of propagation, a statement of the applicant's willingness to participate in a cooperative breeding program and to maintain or contribute data to a studbook;

(2) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (a)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not a permit should be issued. In making this decision, the Director shall consider, in addition to the general criteria in §13.21(b) of this subchapter, the following factors:

(i) Whether the purpose for which the permit is required is adequate to justify removing from the wild or otherwise changing the status of the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(ii) The probable direct and indirect effect which issuing the permit would have on the wild populations of the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(iii) Whether the permit, if issued, would in any way, directly or indirectly, conflict with any known program intended to enhance the survival probabilities of the population from which the wildlife sought to be covered by the permit was or would be removed;

(iv) Whether the purpose for which the permit is required would be likely to reduce the threat of extinction facing the species of wildlife sought to be covered by the permit;

(v) The opinions or views of scientists or other persons or organizations having expertise concerning the wildlife or other matters germane to the application; and

(vi) Whether the expertise, facilities, or other resources available to the applicant appear adequate to successfully accomplish the objectives stated in the application.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to the general conditions set forth in part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph shall be subject to the special condition that the escape of living wildlife covered by the permit shall be immediately reported to the Service office designated in the permit.

(4) Duration of permits. The duration of permits issued under this paragraph shall be designated on the face of the permit.

(b)(1) Application requirements for permits for incidental taking. (i) A person wishing to get a permit for an activity prohibited by §17.31 submits an application for activities under this paragraph.

(ii) The director shall publish notice in the Federal Register of each application for a permit that is made under this section. Each notice shall invite the submission from interested parties, within 30 days after the date of the notice, of written data, views, or arguments with respect to the application.

(iii) Each application must be submitted on an official application (Form 3-200) provided by the Service, and must include as an attachment, all of the following information:

(A) A complete description of the activity sought to be authorized;

(B) The common and scientific names of the species sought to be covered by the permit, as well as the number, age, and sex of such species, if known;

(C) A conservation plan that specifies:

(1) The impact that will likely result from such taking;

(2) What steps the applicant will take to monitor, minimize, and mitigate such impacts, the funding that will be available to implement such steps, and the procedures to be used to deal with unforeseen circumstances;

(3) What alternative actions to such taking the applicant considered and the reasons why such alternatives are not proposed to be utilized; and

(4) Such other measures that the Director may require as being necessary or appropriate for purposes of the plan.

(2) Issuance criteria. (i) Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not a permit should be issued. The Director shall consider the general issuance criteria in 13.21(b) of this subchapter, except for 13.21(b)(4), and shall issue the permit if he or she finds that:

(A) The taking will be incidental;

(B) The applicant will, to the maximum extent practicable, minimize and mitigate the impacts of such takings;

(C) The applicant will ensure that adequate funding for the conservation plan and procedures to deal with unforeseen circumstances will be provided;

(D) The taking will not appreciably reduce the likelihood of the survival and recovery of the species in the wild;

(E) The measures, if any, required under paragraph (b)(1)(iii)(D) of this section will be met; and

(F) He or she has received such other assurances as he or she may require that the plan will be implemented.

(ii) In making his or her decision, the Director shall also consider the anticipated duration and geographic scope of the applicant's planned activities, including the amount of listed species habitat that is involved and the degree to which listed species and their habitats are affected.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to the general conditions set forth in part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph shall contain such terms and conditions as the Director deems necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the permit and the conservation plan including, but not limited to, monitoring and reporting requirements deemed necessary for determining whether such terms and conditions are being complied with. The Director shall rely upon existing reporting requirements to the maximum extent practicable.

(4) Duration of permits. The duration of permits issued under this paragraph shall be sufficient to provide adequate assurances to the permittee to commit funding necessary for the activities authorized by the permit, including conservation activities and land use restrictions. In determining the duration of a permit, the Director shall consider the duration of the planned activities, as well as the possible positive and negative effects associated with permits of the proposed duration on listed species, including the extent to which the conservation plan will enhance the habitat of listed species and increase the long-term survivability of such species.

(5) Assurances provided to permittee in case of changed or unforeseen circumstances. The assurances in this paragraph (b)(5) apply only to incidental take permits issued in accordance with paragraph (b)(2) of this section where the conservation plan is being properly implemented, and apply only with respect to species adequately covered by the conservation plan. These assurances cannot be provided to Federal agencies. This rule does not apply to incidental take permits issued prior to March 25, 1998. The assurances provided in incidental take permits issued prior to March 25, 1998 remain in effect, and those permits will not be revised as a result of this rulemaking.

(i) Changed circumstances provided for in the plan. If additional conservation and mitigation measures are deemed necessary to respond to changed circumstances and were provided for in the plan's operating conservation program, the permittee will implement the measures specified in the plan.

(ii) Changed circumstances not provided for in the plan. If additional conservation and mitigation measures are deemed necessary to respond to changed circumstances and such measures were not provided for in the plan's operating conservation program, the Director will not require any conservation and mitigation measures in addition to those provided for in the plan without the consent of the permittee, provided the plan is being properly implemented.

(iii) Unforeseen circumstances. (A) In negotiating unforeseen circumstances, the Director will not require the commitment of additional land, water, or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources beyond the level otherwise agreed upon for the species covered by the conservation plan without the consent of the permittee.

(B) If additional conservation and mitigation measures are deemed necessary to respond to unforeseen circumstances, the Director may require additional measures of the permittee where the conservation plan is being properly implemented, but only if such measures are limited to modifications within conserved habitat areas, if any, or to the conservation plan's operating conservation program for the affected species, and maintain the original terms of the conservation plan to the maximum extent possible. Additional conservation and mitigation measures will not involve the commitment of additional land, water or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources otherwise available for development or use under the original terms of the conservation plan without the consent of the permittee.

(C) The Director will have the burden of demonstrating that such unforeseen circumstances exist, using the best scientific and commercial data available. These findings must be clearly documented and based upon reliable technical information regarding the status and habitat requirements of the affected species. The Director will consider, but not be limited to, the following factors:

(1) Size of the current range of the affected species;

(2) Percentage of range adversely affected by the conservation plan;

(3) Percentage of range conserved by the conservation plan;

(4) Ecological significance of that portion of the range affected by the conservation plan;

(5) Level of knowledge about the affected species and the degree of specificity of the species' conservation program under the conservation plan; and

(6) Whether failure to adopt additional conservation measures would appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery of the affected species in the wild.

(6) Nothing in this rule will be construed to limit or constrain the Director, any Federal, State, local, or Tribal government agency, or a private entity, from taking additional actions at its own expense to protect or conserve a species included in a conservation plan.

(7) Discontinuance of permit activity. Notwithstanding the provisions of §13.26 of this subchapter, a permittee under this paragraph (b) remains responsible for any outstanding minimization and mitigation measures required under the terms of the permit for take that occurs prior to surrender of the permit and such minimization and mitigation measures as may be required pursuant to the termination provisions of an implementing agreement, habitat conservation plan, or permit even after surrendering the permit to the Service pursuant to §13.26 of this subchapter. The permit shall be deemed canceled only upon a determination by the Service that such minimization and mitigation measures have been implemented. Upon surrender of the permit, no further take shall be authorized under the terms of the surrendered permit.

(8) Criteria for revocation. A permit issued under paragraph (b) of this section may not be revoked for any reason except those set forth in §13.28(a)(1) through (4) of this subchapter or unless continuation of the permitted activity would be inconsistent with the criterion set forth in 16 U.S.C. 1539(a)(2)(B)(iv) and the inconsistency has not been remedied.

(c)(1) Application requirements for permits for the enhancement of survival through Safe Harbor Agreements. The applicant must submit an application for a permit under this paragraph (c) to the appropriate Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for the Region where the applicant resides or where the proposed action is to occur (for appropriate addresses, see 50 CFR 10.22), if the applicant wishes to engage in any activity prohibited by §17.31. The applicant must submit an official Service application form (3-200.54) that includes the following information:

(i) The common and scientific names of the listed species for which the applicant requests incidental take authorization;

(ii) A description of how incidental take of the covered species pursuant to the Safe Harbor Agreement is likely to occur, both as a result of management activities and as a result of the return to baseline;

(iii) A Safe Harbor Agreement that complies with the requirements of the Safe Harbor policy available from the Service; and

(iv) The Director must publish notice in the Federal Register of each application for a permit that is made under this paragraph (c). Each notice must invite the submission from interested parties within 30 days after the date of the notice of written data, views, or arguments with respect to the application. The procedures included in §17.22(e) for permit objection apply to any notice published by the Director under this paragraph (c).

(2) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not to issue a permit. The Director shall consider the general issuance criteria in §13.21(b) of this subchapter, except for §13.21(b)(4), and may issue the permit if he or she finds:

(i) The take will be incidental to an otherwise lawful activity and will be in accordance with the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement;

(ii) The implementation of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement is reasonably expected to provide a net conservation benefit to the affected listed species by contributing to the recovery of listed species included in the permit, and the Safe Harbor Agreement otherwise complies with the Safe Harbor policy available from the Service;

(iii) The probable direct and indirect effects of any authorized take will not appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any listed species;

(iv) Implementation of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement is consistent with applicable Federal, State, and Tribal laws and regulations;

(v) Implementation of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement will not be in conflict with any ongoing conservation or recovery programs for listed species covered by the permit; and

(vi) The applicant has shown capability for and commitment to implementing all of the terms of the Safe Harbor Agreement.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to any applicable general permit conditions set forth in part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph (c) is subject to the following special conditions:

(i) A requirement for the participating property owner to notify the Service of any transfer of lands subject to a Safe Harbor Agreement;

(ii) When appropriate, a requirement for the permittee to give the Service reasonable advance notice (generally at least 30 days) of when he or she expects to incidentally take any listed species covered under the permit. Such notification will provide the Service with an opportunity to relocate affected individuals of the species, if possible and appropriate; and

(iii) Any additional requirements or conditions the Director deems necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the permit and the Safe Harbor Agreement.

(4) Permit effective date. Permits issued under this paragraph (c) become effective the day of issuance for species covered by the Safe Harbor Agreement.

(5) Assurances provided to permittee. (i) The assurances in subparagraph (ii) of this paragraph (c)(5) apply only to Safe Harbor permits issued in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section where the Safe Harbor Agreement is being properly implemented, and apply only with respect to species covered by the Agreement and permit. These assurances cannot be provided to Federal agencies. The assurances provided in this section apply only to Safe Harbor permits issued after July 19, 1999.

(ii) The Director and the permittee may agree to revise or modify the management measures set forth in a Safe Harbor Agreement if the Director determines that such revisions or modifications do not change the Director's prior determination that the Safe Harbor Agreement is reasonably expected to provide a net conservation benefit to the listed species. However, the Director may not require additional or different management activities to be undertaken by a permittee without the consent of the permittee.

(6) Additional actions. Nothing in this rule will be construed to limit or constrain the Director, any Federal, State, local or Tribal government agency, or a private entity, from taking additional actions at its own expense to protect or conserve a species included in a Safe Harbor Agreement.

(7) Criteria for revocation. The Director may not revoke a permit issued under paragraph (c) of this section except as provided in this paragraph. The Director may revoke a permit for any reason set forth in §13.28(a)(1) through (4) of this subchapter. The Director may revoke a permit if continuation of the permitted activity would either appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any listed species or directly or indirectly alter designated critical habitat such that it appreciably diminishes the value of that critical habitat for both the survival and recovery of a listed species. Before revoking a permit for either of the latter two reasons, the Director, with the consent of the permittee, will pursue all appropriate options to avoid permit revocation. These options may include, but are not limited to: extending or modifying the existing permit, capturing and relocating the species, compensating the landowner to forgo the activity, purchasing an easement or fee simple interest in the property, or arranging for a third-party acquisition of an interest in the property.

(8) Duration of permits. The duration of permits issued under this paragraph (c) must be sufficient to provide a net conservation benefit to species covered in the enhancement of survival permit. In determining the duration of a permit, the Director will consider the duration of the planned activities, as well as the positive and negative effects associated with permits of the proposed duration on covered species, including the extent to which the conservation activities included in the Safe Harbor Agreement will enhance the survival and contribute to the recovery of listed species included in the permit.

(d)(1) Application requirements for permits for the enhancement of survival through Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances. The applicant must submit an application for a permit under this paragraph (d) to the appropriate Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for the Region where the applicant resides or where the proposed activity is to occur (for appropriate addresses, see 50 CFR 10.22). When a species covered by a Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances is listed as threatened and the applicant wishes to engage in activities identified in the Agreement and otherwise prohibited by §17.31, the applicant must apply for an enhancement of survival permit for species covered by the Agreement. The permit will become valid if and when covered proposed, candidate or other unlisted species is listed as a threatened species. The applicant must submit an official Service application form (3-200.54) that includes the following information:

(i) The common and scientific names of the species for which the applicant requests incidental take authorization;

(ii) A description of the land use or water management activity for which the applicant requests incidental take authorization; and

(iii) A Candidate Conservation Agreement that complies with the requirements of the Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances policy available from the Service.

(iv) The Director must publish notice in the Federal Register of each application for a permit that is made under this paragraph (d). Each notice must invite the submission from interested parties within 30 days after the date of the notice of written data, views, or arguments with respect to the application. The procedures included in §17.22(e) for permit objection apply to any notice published by the Director under this paragraph (d).

(2) Issuance criteria. Upon receiving an application completed in accordance with paragraph (d)(1) of this section, the Director will decide whether or not to issue a permit. The Director shall consider the general issuance criteria in §13.21(b) of this subchapter, except for §13.21(b)(4), and may issue the permit if he or she finds:

(i) The take will be incidental to an otherwise lawful activity and will be in accordance with the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement;

(ii) The Candidate Conservation Agreement complies with the requirements of the Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances policy available from the Service;

(iii) The probable direct and indirect effects of any authorized take will not appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any species;

(iv) Implementation of the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement is consistent with applicable Federal, State, and Tribal laws and regulations;

(v) Implementation of the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement will not be in conflict with any ongoing conservation programs for species covered by the permit; and

(vi) The applicant has shown capability for and commitment to implementing all of the terms of the Candidate Conservation Agreement.

(3) Permit conditions. In addition to any applicable general permit conditions set forth in part 13 of this subchapter, every permit issued under this paragraph (d) is subject to the following special conditions:

(i) A requirement for the property owner to notify the Service of any transfer of lands subject to a Candidate Conservation Agreement;

(ii) When appropriate, a requirement for the permittee to give the Service reasonable advance notice (generally at least 30 days) of when he or she expects to incidentally take any listed species covered under the permit. Such notification will provide the Service with an opportunity to relocate affected individuals of the species, if possible and appropriate; and

(iii) Any additional requirements or conditions the Director deems necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes of the permit and the Candidate Conservation Agreement.

(4) Permit effective date. Permits issued under this paragraph (d) become effective for a species covered by a Candidate Conservation Agreement on the effective date of a final rule that lists a covered species as threatened.

(5) Assurances provided to permittee in case of changed or unforeseen circumstances. The assurances in this paragraph (d)(5) apply only to permits issued in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) where the Candidate Conservation with Assurances Agreement is being properly implemented, and apply only with respect to species adequately covered by the Candidate Conservation with Assurances Agreement. These assurances cannot be provided to Federal agencies.

(i) Changed circumstances provided for in the Agreement. If the Director determines that additional conservation measures are necessary to respond to changed circumstances and these measures were set forth in the Agreement, the permittee will implement the measures specified in the Agreement.

(ii) Changed circumstances not provided for in the Agreement. If the Director determines that additional conservation measures not provided for in the Agreement are necessary to respond to changed circumstances, the Director will not require any conservation measures in addition to those provided for in the Agreement without the consent of the permittee, provided the Agreement is being properly implemented.

(iii) Unforeseen circumstances. (A) In negotiating unforeseen circumstances, the Director will not require the commitment of additional land, water, or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources beyond the level otherwise agreed upon for the species covered by the Agreement without the consent of the permittee.

(B) If the Director determines additional conservation measures are necessary to respond to unforeseen circumstances, the Director may require additional measures of the permittee where the Agreement is being properly implemented, but only if such measures maintain the original terms of the Agreement to the maximum extent possible. Additional conservation measures will not involve the commitment of additional land, water, or financial compensation or additional restrictions on the use of land, water, or other natural resources otherwise available for development or use under the original terms of the Agreement without the consent of the permittee.

(C) The Director will have the burden of demonstrating that unforeseen circumstances exist, using the best scientific and commercial data available. These findings must be clearly documented and based upon reliable technical information regarding the status and habitat requirements of the affected species. The Director will consider, but not be limited to, the following factors:

(1) Size of the current range of the affected species;

(2) Percentage of range adversely affected by the Agreement;

(3) Percentage of range conserved by the Agreement;

(4) Ecological significance of that portion of the range affected by the Agreement;

(5) Level of knowledge about the affected species and the degree of specificity of the species' conservation program under the Agreement; and

(6) Whether failure to adopt additional conservation measures would appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery of the affected species in the wild.

(6) Additional actions. Nothing in this rule will be construed to limit or constrain the Director, any Federal, State, local or Tribal government agency, or a private entity, from taking additional actions at its own expense to protect or conserve a species included in a Candidate Conservation with Assurances Agreement.

(7) Criteria for revocation. The Director may not revoke a permit issued under paragraph (d) of this section except as provided in this paragraph. The Director may revoke a permit for any reason set forth in §13.28(a)(1) through (4) of this subchapter. The Director may revoke a permit if continuation of the permitted activity would either appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and recovery in the wild of any listed species or directly or indirectly alter designated critical habitat such that it appreciably diminishes the value of that critical habitat for both the survival and recovery of a listed species. Before revoking a permit for either of the latter two reasons, the Director, with the consent of the permittee, will pursue all appropriate options to avoid permit revocation. These options may include, but are not limited to: extending or modifying the existing permit, capturing and relocating the species, compensating the landowner to forgo the activity, purchasing an easement or fee simple interest in the property, or arranging for a third-party acquisition of an interest in the property.

(8) Duration of the Candidate Conservation Agreement. The duration of a Candidate Conservation Agreement covered by a permit issued under this paragraph (d) must be sufficient to enable the Director to determine that the benefits of the conservation measures in the Agreement, when combined with those benefits that would be achieved if it is assumed that the conservation measures would also be implemented on other necessary properties, would preclude or remove any need to list the species covered by the Agreement.

[50 FR 39689, Sept. 30, 1985, as amended at 63 FR 8871, Feb. 23, 1998; 63 FR 52635, Oct. 1, 1998; 64 FR 32714, June 17, 1999; 64 FR 52676, Sept. 30, 1999; 69 FR 24093, May 3, 2004; 69 FR 29670, May 25, 2004; 69 FR 71731, Dec. 10, 2004]

§17.40   Special rules—mammals.

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 19794, April 9, 2014.

(a) [Reserved]

(b) Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)—(1) Prohibitions. The following prohibitions apply to the grizzly bear:

(i) Taking. (A) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1)(i)(B) through (F) of this section, no person shall take any grizzly bear in the 48 conterminous states of the United States.

(B) Grizzly bears may be taken in self-defense or in defense of others, but such taking shall be reported, within 5 days of occurrence, to the Assistant Regional Director, Division of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 25486, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225 (303/236-7540 or FTS 776-7540), if occurring in Montana or Wyoming, or to the Assistant Regional Director, Division of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lloyd 500 Building, Suite 1490, 500 Northeast Multnomah Street, Portland, Oregon 97232 (503/231-6125 or FTS 429-6125), if occurring in Idaho or Washington, and to appropriate State and Indian Reservation Tribal authorities. Grizzly bears or their parts taken in self-defense or in defense of others shall not be possessed, delivered, carried, transported, shipped, exported, received, or sold, except by Federal, State, or Tribal authorities.

(C) Removal of nuisance bears. A grizzly bear consituting a demonstrable but non immediate threat to human safety or committing significant depredations to lawfully present livestock, crops, or beehives may be taken, but only if:

(1) It has not been reasonably possible to eliminate such threat or depredation by live-capturing and releasing unharmed in a remote area the grizzly bear involved; and

(2) The taking is done in a humane manner by authorized Federal, State, or Tribal authorities, and in accordance with current interagency guidelines covering the taking of such nuisance bears; and

(3) The taking is reported within 5 days of occurrence to the appropriate Assistant Regional Director, Division of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as indicated in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(B) of this section, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities.

(D) Federal, State, or Tribal scientific or research activities. Federal, State, or Tribal authorities may take grizzly bears for scientific or research purposes, but only if such taking does not result in death or permanent injury to the bears involved. Such taking must be reported within 5 days of occurrence to the appropriate Assistant Regional Director, Division of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as indicated in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(B) of this section, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities.

(E) [Reserved]

(F) National Parks. The regulations of the National Park Service shall govern all taking of grizzly bears in National Parks.

(ii) Unlawfully taken grizzly bears. (A) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1)(ii)(B) and (iv) of this section, no person shall possess, deliver, carry, transport, ship, export, receive, or sell any unlawfully taken grizzly bear. Any unlawful taking of a grizzly bear shall be reported within 5 days of occurrence to the appropriate Assistant Regional Director, Division of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as indicated in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(B) of this section, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities.

(B) Authorized Federal, State, or Tribal employees, when acting in the course of their official duties, may, for scientific or research purposes, possess, deliver, carry, transport, ship, export, or receive unlawfully taken grizzly bears.

(iii) Import or export. Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1)(iii) (A) and (B) and (iv) of this section, no person shall import any grizzly bear into the United States.

(A) Federal, State, or Tribal scientific or research activities. Federal, State, or Tribal authorities may import grizzly bears into the United States for scientific or research purposes.

(B) Public zoological institution. Public zoological institutions (see 50 CFR 10.12) may import grizzly bears into the United States.

(iv) Commercial transactions. (A) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(1)(iv)(B) of this section, no person shall, in the course of commercial activity, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce any grizzly bear.

(B) A public zoological institution (see 50 CFR 10.12) dealing with other public zoological institutions may sell grizzly bears or offer them for sale in interstate or foreign commerce, and may, in the course of commercial activity, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship grizzly bears in interstate or foreign commerce.

(v) Other violations. No person shall attempt to commit, cause to be committed, or solicit another to commit any act prohibited by paragraph (b)(1) of this section.

(2) Definitions. As used in paragraph (b) of this section:

Grizzly bear means any member of the species Ursus arctos horribilis of the 48 conterminous States of the United States, including any part, offspring, dead body, part of a dead body, or product of such species.

Grizzly bear accompanied by young means any grizzly bear having offspring, including one or more cubs, yearlings, or 2-year-olds, in its immediate vicinity.

Identified means permanently marked or documented so as to be identifiable by law enforcement officials at a subsequent date.

State, Federal or Tribal authority means an employee of State, Federal, or Indian Tribal government who, as part of his/her official duties, normally handles grizzly bears.

Young grizzly bear means a cub, yearling, or 2-year-old grizzly bear.

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(c) Primates. (1) Except as noted in paragraphs (c)(2) and (c)(3) of this section, all provisions of §17.31 shall apply to the lesser slow loris, Nycticebus pygmaeus; Philippine tarsier, Tarsius syrichta; white-footed tamarin, Saguinus leucopus; black howler monkey, Alouatta pigra; stump-tailed macaque, Macaca arctoides; gelada baboon, Theropithecus gelada; Formosan rock macaque, Macaca cyclopis; Japanese macaque, Macaca fuscata; Toque macaque, Macaca sinica; long-tailed langur, Presbytis potenziani; purple-faced langur, Presbytis senex; Tonkin snub-nosed langur, Pygathrix (Rhinopithecus) avunculus; and, in captivity only, chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

(2) The prohibitions referred to above do not apply to any live member of such species held in captivity in the United States on the effective date of the final rulemaking, or to the progeny of such animals, or to the progeny of animals legally imported into the United States after the effective date of the final rulemaking, Provided, That the person wishing to engage in any activity which would otherwise be prohibited must be able to show satisfactory documentary or other evidence as to the captive status of the particular member of the species on the effective date of this rulemaking or that the particular member of the species was born in captivity in the United States after the effective date of this rulemaking. Identification of the particular member to a record in the International Species Inventory System (ISIS), or to a Federal, State or local government permit, shall be deemed to be satisfactory evidence. Records in the form of studbooks or inventories, kept in the normal course of business, shall be acceptable as evidence, provided that a notarized statement is inserted in such record to the effect that:

(i) The records were kept in the normal course of business prior to November 18, 1976, and accurately identify (by use of markers, tags, or other acceptable marking devices) individual animals; or

(ii) That the individual animal identified by the records was born in captivity on ____(Date).

The notarized statement in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section, shall be acceptable only if the notarization is dated on or before January 3, 1977. The notarized statement in paragraph (c)(2)(ii), of this section, shall be acceptable only if the notarization is dated within 15 days of the date of birth of the animal.

(3) The provisions of §§17.21, 17.22, and 17.23 shall apply to any individual chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) within the historic range of the species, regardless of whether in the wild or captivity, and also shall apply to any individual chimpanzee not within this range, but which has originated within this range after the effective date of these regulations, and also shall apply to the progeny of any such chimpanzee, other than to the progeny of animals legally imported into the United States after the effective date of these regulations. For the purposes of this paragraph, the historic range of the chimpanzee shall consist of the following countries: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, and Zaire.

(d) [Reserved]

(e) African elephant (Loxodonta africana)—(1) Definitions. For the purposes of this paragraph (e):

(i) African elephant shall mean any member of the species Loxodonta africana, whether live or dead, and any part or product thereof.

(ii) Raw ivory means any African elephant tusk, and any piece thereof, the surface of which, polished or unpolished, is unaltered or minimally carved.

(iii) Worked ivory means any African elephant tusk, and any piece thereof, which is not raw ivory.

(iv) Lip mark area means that area of a whole African elephant tusk where the tusk emerges from the skull and which is usually denoted by a prominent ring of staining on the tusk in its natural state.

(2) Prohibitions. Except as provided in the exceptions in paragraph (e)(3) of this section, it shall be unlawful for any person to:

(i) Import or export any African elephant,

(ii) Possess, sell or offer for sale, receive, deliver, transport ship, or export any African elephant which was illegally imported into the United States,

(iii) Sell or offer for sale any sport-hunted trophy imported into the United States in violation of permit conditions.

(3) Exceptions. (i) African elephants, other than sport-hunted trophies and raw and worked ivory, may be imported or exported provided all permit requirements of 50 CFR parts 13 and 23 have been complied with.

(ii) Ivory. (A) Raw or worked ivory (other than sport-hunted trophies) may be imported only if:

(1) It is a bona fide antique of greater than 100 years of age on the day of import, or

(2) It was exported from the United States after being registered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

(B) Worked ivory may be exported in accordance with the permit requirements of 50 CFR parts 13 and 23.

(C) Raw ivory may not be exported from the United States for commercial purposes under any circumstances.

(iii) Sport-hunted trophies may be imported into the United States provided:

(A) The trophy originates in a country for which the Service has received notice of that country's African elephant ivory quota for the year of export;

(B) All of the permit requirements of 50 CFR parts 13 and 23 have been complied with;

(C) A determination is made that the killing of the animal whose trophy is intended for import would enhance survival of the species; and

(D) The trophy is legibly marked by means of punch-dies, under a marking and registration system established by the country of origin, that includes the following information: Country of origin represented by the two-letter code established by the International Organization for Standardization (see appendix A to chapter I) followed by the registration number assigned to the last two digits of the year of registration and the weight of raw ivory to the nearest kilogram. Any mark must be placed on the lip mark area and indicated by a flash of color which serves as a background for such mark.

(f) Leopard. (1) Except as noted in paragraph (f)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 of this part and exemptions of §17.32 of this part shall apply to the leopard populations occurring in southern Africa to the south of a line running along the borders of the following countries: Gabon/Rio Muni; Gabon/Cameroon; Congo/Cameroon; Congo/Central African Republic; Zaire/Central African Republic; Zaire/Sudan; Uganda/Sudan; Kenya/Sudan; Kenya/Ethiopia; Kenya/Somalia.

(2) A sport-hunted leopard trophy legally taken after the effective date of this rulemaking, from the area south of the line delineated above, may be imported into the United States without a Threatened Species permit pursuant to §17.32 of this part, provided that the applicable provisions of 50 CFR part 23 have been met.

(g) Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens).

(1) Except as noted in paragraphs (g)(2) through (g)(6) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31(a) and (b) and exemptions of §17.32 apply to the Utah prairie dog.

(2) A Utah prairie dog may be directly or intentionally taken as described in paragraphs (g)(3) and (4) of this section on agricultural lands, properties within 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles (mi)) of conservation lands, and areas where prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites.

(3) Agricultural lands and properties near conservation lands. When permitted by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR), or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, direct or intentional take is allowed on private properties that are located within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation land, and on agricultural land. Records on permitted take will be maintained by the State (or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service), and made available to the Service upon request.

(i) Agricultural land. (A) Take may be permitted only on agricultural land being physically or economically affected by Utah prairie dogs, and only when the spring count on the agricultural lands is seven or more individuals, and only during the period of June 15 to December 31; and

(B) The land must:

(1) Meet the general classification of irrigated, dryland, grazing land, orchard, or meadow;

(2) Be capable of producing crops or forage;

(3) Be at least 2 contiguous hectares (5 contiguous acres) in area (smaller parcels may qualify where devoted to agricultural use in conjunction with other eligible acreage under identical legal ownership);

(4) Be managed in such a way that there is a reasonable expectation of profit;

(5) Have been devoted to agricultural use for at least 2 successive years immediately preceding the year in which application is made; and

(6) Meet State average annual (per-acre) production requirements.

(ii) Private property near conservation land. (A) Take may be permitted on private properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of Utah prairie dog conservation land during the period of June 15 to December 31.

(B) Conservation lands are defined as non-Federal areas set aside for the preservation of Utah prairie dogs and are managed specifically or primarily toward that purpose. Conservation lands may include, but are not limited to, properties set aside as conservation banks, fee-title purchased properties, properties under conservation easements, and properties subject to a safe harbor agreement (see §17.22). Conservation lands do not include Federal lands.

(iii) Amount of permitted take on agricultural lands and private property near conservation land. (A) The UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will ensure that permitted take on agricultural lands and properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands does not exceed 10 percent of the estimated rangewide population annually.

(B) On agricultural lands, the UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will limit permitted take to 7 percent of the estimated annual rangewide population and will limit within-colony take to one-half of a colony's estimated annual production. The UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will spatially distribute the 7 percent allowed take on agricultural lands across the three Recovery Units, based on the distribution of the total annual population estimate within each Recovery Unit.

(C) In setting take limits on properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands, the UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will consider the amount of take that occurs on agricultural lands. The State, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will restrict the remaining permitted take (the amount that would bring the total take up to 10 percent of the estimated annual rangewide population) on properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands to animals in excess of the baseline population. The baseline population of these lands is determined in accordance with paragraph (g)(3)(iii)(D) of this section.

(D) Take on properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands is restricted to prairie dogs in excess of the baseline population. The baseline population is the highest estimated total (summer) population size on that property during the 5 years prior to the establishment of the conservation property, except that if no UDWR surveys to determine population size on a property were conducted during such 5-year period, the baseline population is the estimated total (summer) population size on that property as determined in the first survey conducted after the establishment of the conservation property. The baseline population will be established by the UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service.

(E) Translocated Utah prairie dogs will count toward the take limits in paragraphs (g)(3)(iii)(A) through (D) of this section.

(iv) Methods of allowed direct take on agricultural lands and private properties near conservation land. Methods for controlling Utah prairie dogs on agricultural lands and properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands are limited to activities associated with translocation efforts by trained and permitted individuals complying with current Service-approved guidance, trapping intended for lethal removal, and shooting. Actions intended to drown or poison Utah prairie dogs and the use of gas cartridges, anticoagulants, and explosive devices are prohibited.

(4) Human safety hazards and significant human cultural or human burial sites. (i) Nonlethal take is allowed where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites, if approved in writing by the Service. To reduce hazards, prairie dog burrows may be filled with dirt if they are directly creating human hazards or disturbing the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites. Utah prairie dogs also may be translocated from these sites to approved translocation sites by properly trained personnel using Service-approved translocation protocols.

(ii) Direct or intentional lethal take is allowed where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites, but only after all practicable measures to resolve the conflict are implemented, and only as approved in writing by the Service. A permit is not required to allow take under these conditions.

(A) All practicable measures means, with respect to these situations:

(1) Construction of prairie-dog-proof fence, above and below grade to specifications approved by the Service, around the area in which there is concern.

(2) Translocation of Utah prairie dogs out of the fenced area in which there is a concern must be conducted prior to allowing lethal take. Lethal take is allowed only to remove prairie dogs that remain in these areas after the measures to fence and translocate are successfully carried out.

(3) Continued maintenance or modification of the fence as needed to preclude Utah prairie dogs from entering the fenced sites.

(B) There are no restrictions on the amount, timing, or methods of lethal take allowed on lands where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites, as long as all qualifications in paragraphs (g)(4)(ii)(A)(1)through (3) of this section are met.

(C) The amount of take in areas where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites does not contribute to the upper permitted take limits described above for agricultural lands and private properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands.

(5) Incidental take associated with agriculture. Utah prairie dogs may be taken when take is incidental to otherwise-legal activities associated with legal and standard agricultural practices on legitimately operating agricultural lands. Acceptable practices include plowing to depths that do not exceed 46 cm (18 in.), discing, harrowing, irrigating crops, mowing, harvesting, and bailing, as long as the activities are not intended to eradicate Utah prairie dogs. There is no numeric limit established for incidental take associated with standard agricultural practices. Incidental take is in addition to, and does not contribute to, the take limits described in paragraphs (g)(2) through (4) of this section. A permit is not required for incidental take associated with agricultural practices.

(6) If the Service receives evidence that take pursuant to paragraphs (g)(2) through (5) of this section is having an effect that is inconsistent with the conservation of the Utah prairie dog, the Service may immediately prohibit or restrict such take as appropriate for the conservation of the species. The Service will notify the permitting entities in writing if take restrictions are necessary.

(h) Mountain lion (Felis concolor). (1) Except as allowed in paragraphs (h)(2), (h)(3), and (h)(4) of this section, no person shall take any free-living mountain lion (Felis concolor) in Florida.

(2) A mountain lion (Felis concolor) may be taken in this area under a valid threatened species permit issued pursuant to 50 CFR 17.52.

(3) A mountain lion (Felis concolor) may be taken in Florida by an employee or designated agent of the Service or the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission for taxonomic identification or other reasons consistent with the conservation of the endangered Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi). When it has been established by the Service, in consultation with the State, that an animal in question is not a Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi) or an eastern cougar (Felis concolor couguar), such animals may be removed from the wild. The disposition of animals so taken shall be at the discretion of the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, with the concurrence of the Fish and Wildlife Service.

(4) Take for reasons of human safety is allowed as specified under 50 CFR 17.21(c)(2) and 17.21(c)(3)(iv).

(5) Any take pursuant to paragraph (h)(4) of this section must be reported in writing to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Law Enforcement, P.O. Box 3247, Arlington, Virginia 22203, within 5 days. The specimen may only be retained, disposed of, or salvaged in accordance with directions from the Service.

(i) Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus). (1) Except as noted in paragraph (i)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 and exemptions of §17.32 shall apply to any black bear within the historic range of the Louisiana black bear (Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi).

(2) Subsection 17.40(i)(1) and §17.31 shall not prohibit effects incidental to normal forest management activities within the historic range of the Louisiana black bear except for activities causing damage to or loss of den trees, den tree sites or candidate den trees. For purposes of this exemption, normal forest management activities are defined as those activities that support a sustained yield of timber products and wildlife habitats, thereby maintaining forestland conditions in occupied habitat. For purposes of this special rule, candidate den trees are considered to be bald cypress and tupelo gum with visible cavities, having a minimum diameter at breast height (DBH) of 36 inches, and occurring in or along rivers, lakes, streams, bayous, sloughs, or other water bodies.

(3) This express exemption for normal forest management activities provided by this special rule is subject to modification or withdrawal if the Service determines that this provision fails to further the conservation of the Louisiana black bear.

(j) Argali (Ovis ammon) in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan. (1) Except as noted in paragraph (j)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 of this part and exemptions of §17.32 of this part shall apply to this species in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan

(Note. In all other parts of its range the argali is classified as endangered and covered by §17.21).

(2) Upon receiving from the governments of Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan properly documented and verifiable certification that (i) argali populations in those countries are sufficiently large to sustain sport hunting, (ii) regulating authorities have the capacity to obtain sound data on these populations, (iii) regulating authorities recognize these populations as a valuable resource and have the legal and practical capacity to manage them as such, (iv) the habitat of these populations is secure, (v) regulating authorities can ensure that the involved trophies have in fact been legally taken from the specified populations, and (vi) funds derived from the involved sport hunting are applied primarily to argali conservation, the Director may, consistent with the purposes of the Act, authorize by publication of a notice in the Federal Register the importation of personal sport-hunted argali trophies, taken legally in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan after the date of such notice, without a Threatened Species permit pursuant to §17.32 of this part, provided that the applicable provisions of 50 CFR part 23 have been met.

(k) Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). (1) What lynx does this special rule apply to? The regulations in this paragraph (k) apply to all wild and captive lynx in the contiguous United States.

(2) What activities are prohibited for wild lynx? All prohibitions and provisions of 50 CFR 17.31 and 17.32 apply to wild lynx found in the contiguous United States.

(3) What is considered a captive lynx? (i) For purposes of this paragraph (k), captive lynx means lynx, whether alive or dead, and any part or product, if the specimen was in captivity at the time of the listing, born in captivity, or lawfully imported or transported into the contiguous United States.

(ii) Lynx that were either born or held in captivity and then released into the wild are considered wild.

(4) What activities are allowed for captive lynx? (i) Take. You may take lawfully obtained captive lynx without a permit.

(ii) Import and export. You may export captive live lynx, parts or products of captive lynx provided the specimens are tagged with Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) export tags and/or accompanied by a valid CITES export permit. You may import lawfully obtained lynx that originated outside the United States when you follow the requirements of CITES.

(iii) Interstate commerce. You may deliver, receive, carry, transport, ship, sell, offer to sell, purchase, or offer to purchase in interstate commerce captive lynx and captive lynx parts and products in accordance with State or tribal laws and regulations. In addition, lynx pelts that are properly tagged with valid CITES export tags also qualify for this exemption on interstate commerce.

(5) Are any activities not allowed or restricted for captive lynx? You must comply with all applicable State and tribal laws and regulations. Violation of State or tribal law will also be a violation of the Act.

(l) Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei). (1) What is the definition of take? To harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, trap, kill, or collect; or attempt to engage in any such conduct. Incidental take is that which occurs when it is incidental to and not the purpose of an otherwise lawful activity. Any take that is not authorized by permit provided through section 7 or section 10 of the Act or that is not covered by the exemptions described below is considered illegal take.

(2) When is take of Preble's meadow jumping mice allowed? Take of Preble's meadow jumping mice resulting from the following legally conducted activities, in certain circumstances as described below, is allowed:

(i) Take under permits. Any person with a valid permit issued by the Service under §17.32 may take Preble's meadow jumping mice pursuant to the terms of the permit.

(ii) Rodent control. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to rodent control undertaken within 10 feet of or inside any structure. “Rodent control” includes control of mice and rats by trapping, capturing, or otherwise physically capturing or killing, or poisoning by any substance registered with the Environmental Protection Agency as required by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 136) and applied consistent with its labeling. “Structure” includes but is not limited to any building, stable, grain silo, corral, barn, shed, water or sewage treatment equipment or facility, enclosed parking structure, shelter, gazebo, bandshell, or restroom complex.

(iii) Established, ongoing agricultural activities. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to agricultural activities, including grazing, plowing, seeding, cultivating, minor drainage, burning, mowing, and harvesting, as long as these activities are established, ongoing activities and do not increase impacts to or further encroach upon the Preble's meadow jumping mouse or its habitat. New agricultural activities or those that expand the footprint or intensity of the activity are not considered to be established, ongoing activities.

(iv) Maintenance and replacement of existing landscaping. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to the maintenance and replacement of any landscaping and related structures and improvements, as long as they are currently in place and no increase in impervious surfaces would result from their maintenance and improvement. Construction of new structures or improvements or expansion of the landscaping in a manner that increases impervious surfaces would not be considered maintenance and replacement of existing landscaping.

(v) Existing uses of water. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidentally as a result of existing uses of water associated with the exercise of perfected water rights pursuant to State law and interstate compacts and decrees. (A “perfected water right” is a right that has been put to beneficial use and has been permitted, decreed, or adjudicated pursuant to State law.) Increasing the use or altering the location of use of an existing water right would not be considered an existing use of water.

(vi) Noxious weed control. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to noxious weed control that is conducted in accordance with:

(A) Federal law, including Environmental Protection Agency label restrictions;

(B) Applicable State laws for noxious weed control;

(C) Applicable county bulletins;

(D) Herbicide application guidelines as prescribed by herbicide manufacturers; and

(E) Any future revisions to the authorities listed in paragraphs (l)(2)(vi)(A) through (D) of this section that apply to the herbicides proposed for use within the species' range.

(vii) Ditch maintenance activities. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to normal and customary ditch maintenance activities only if the activities:

(A) Result in the annual loss of no more than 14 mile of riparian shrub habitat per linear mile of ditch, including burning of ditches that results in the annual loss of no more than 14 mile of riparian shrub habitat per linear mile of ditch.

(B) Are performed within the historic footprint of the surface disturbance associated with ditches and related infrastructure, and

(C) Follow the Best Management Practices described in paragraphs (l)(2)(vii)(C)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Persons engaged in ditch maintenance activities shall avoid, to the maximum extent practicable, impacts to shrub vegetation. For example, if accessing the ditch for maintenance or repair activities from an area containing no shrubs is possible, then damage to adjacent shrub vegetation shall be avoided.

(2) Persons engaged in placement or sidecasting of silt and debris removed during ditch cleaning, vegetation or mulch from mowing or cutting, and other material from ditch maintenance shall, to the maximum extent practicable, avoid shrub habitat and at no time disturb more than 14 mile of riparian shrub habitat per linear mile of ditch within any calendar year.

(3) To the maximum extent practicable, all ditch maintenance activities should be carried out during the Preble's hibernation season, November through April.

(D) All ditch maintenance activities carried out during the Preble's active season, May through October, should be conducted during daylight hours only.

(E) Ditch maintenance activities that would result in permanent or long-term loss of potential habitat that would not be considered normal or customary include replacement of existing infrastructure with components of substantially different materials and design, such as replacement of open ditches with pipeline or concrete-lined ditches, replacement of an existing gravel access road with a permanently paved road, or replacement of an earthen diversion structure with a rip-rap and concrete structure, and construction of new infrastructure or the movement of existing infrastructure to new locations, such as realignment of a ditch, building a new access road, or installation of new diversion works where none previously existed.

(3) When is take of Preble's not allowed? (i) Any manner of take not described under paragraph (l)(2) of this section.

(ii) No person may import or export, ship in interstate commerce in the course of commercial activity, or sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce any Preble's meadow jumping mice.

(iii) No person, except for an authorized person, may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship any Preble's meadow jumping mice that have been taken illegally.

(4) Where does this rule apply? The take exemptions provided by this rule are applicable within the entire range of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse.

(m) Vicuña. This paragraph (m) applies to the threatened vicuña (Vicugna vicugna).

(1) What activities involving vicuña are prohibited by this rule? (i) Appendix I populations. All provisions of §17.31 (a) and (b) and §17.32 apply to vicuña and vicuña parts and products originating from populations currently listed in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

(ii) Import, export, and re-export. Except as provided in paragraph (m)(2) of this section, you must not import, export, or re-export, or present for export or re-export without valid CITES permits vicuña or vicuña parts and products originating from populations listed in Appendix II of CITES.

(iii) Commercial activity. Except as provided in paragraph (m)(2) of this section, you must not sell or offer for sale, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce in the course of a commercial activity vicuña or vicuña parts and products from populations listed in Appendix II of CITES.

(iv) It is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to commit, attempt to commit, solicit to commit, or cause to be committed any acts described in paragraphs (m)(1)(ii)-(iii) of this section.

(2) What activities involving vicuña are allowed by this rule? You may import, export, or re-export, or place in interstate or foreign commerce, vicuña products, consisting of either raw fiber or items and cloth made, or partially made, from vicuña fiber, without a threatened species permit issued according to §17.32 only when the provisions in parts 13, 14, and 23 of this chapter and the requirements of the applicable subparagraphs of this paragraph (m)(2) have been met:

(i) Import, export, or re-export. You may import, export, or re-export into or from the United States vicuña products, consisting of either raw fiber or items and cloth made, or partially made, from vicuña fiber originating in a country authorized under paragraph (m)(4) of this section, provided the following conditions are met:

(A) The vicuña product must comply with all CITES product annotations as given in the CITES Secretariat's official list of the CITES Appendices, and all imports, exports, and re-exports of vicuña products (including raw fiber re-exported from, or products manufactured in, intermediary countries) must be identified as follows:

(1) Cloth, cloth products, and other finished products (including luxury handicrafts and knitted articles not produced in the country of origin): The reverse side of cloth, cloth products, and other finished products (including luxury handicrafts and knitted articles not produced in the country of origin), and samples of any of these items, must bear the logo adopted by countries signatory to the “Convenio para la Conservación y Manejo de la Vicuña” and the words “VICUÑA—(Country of Origin),” where country of origin is the name of the country where the vicuña fiber in the products originated, either Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, or Peru. The logo and words may be woven into the item, or may be on a label sewn into the item.

(2) Luxury handicrafts and knitted articles produced in the country of origin: The luxury handicraft or knitted article must bear the logo adopted by countries signatory to the “Convenio para la Conservación y Manejo de la Vicuña” and the words “VICUÑA—(Country of Origin)—ARTESANIA,” where country of origin is the name of the country where the vicuña fiber in the products, and the products themselves, originated, either Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, or Peru. The logo and words may be woven into the item, or may be on a label sewn into the item.

(3) Bulk shipments of raw fiber: The bulk shipment of raw fiber must be sealed with a tamper-proof seal and have the following:

(i) An identification tag with a code identifying the country of origin of the vicuña fiber and the CITES export permit number; and

(ii) The logo adopted by countries signatory to the “Convenio para la Conservación y Manejo de la Vicuña” and the words “VICUÑA—(Country of Origin),” where country of origin is the name of the original exporting country where the vicuña fiber in the products originated, either Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, or Peru.

(B) The shipment must be accompanied by a CITES permit or certificate that contains the following information:

(1) The country of origin, its export permit number, and date of issuance.

(2) If re-export, the country of re-export, its certificate number, and date of issuance.

(3) If applicable, the country of last re-export, its certificate number, and date of issuance.

(C) At the time of import, for each shipment covered by this exception, the country of origin and each country of re-export involved in the trade of a particular shipment must have designated both a CITES Management Authority and Scientific Authority, and have not been identified by the CITES Conference of the Parties, the CITES Standing Committee, or in a Notification from the CITES Secretariat as a country from which Parties should not accept permits. A listing of all countries that have not designated both a Management Authority and Scientific Authority, or that have been identified as a country from which Parties should not accept permits is available by writing: The Division of Management Authority, ARLSQ Room 700, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arlington, VA 22203. The list is also on our website (http://international.fws.gov).

(ii) Noncommercial accompanying baggage. The conditions described in paragraph (m)(2)(i) of this section also apply to noncommercial personal effects in accompanying baggage or household effects from Appendix II populations. Such items are treated the same as Appendix II commercial shipments, and must comply with the same documentary requirements. All other noncommercial personal effects in accompanying baggage or household effects require both a CITES Appendix I permit and a permit as described in §17.32.

(iii) Embryos, gametes, blood, other tissue samples, and live animals. This special rule does not apply to embryos, gametes, blood, or other tissue samples of vicuña, or to live vicuña. Import of such specimens requires an import permit as described in §17.32 in addition to CITES Appendix I import and export permits, and will be issued only for bona fide scientific research contributing to conservation of the species in the wild.

(3) When and how will the Service inform the public of additional restrictions in trade of vicuña? Except in rare cases involving extenuating circumstances that do not adversely affect the conservation of the species, we will issue an information notice that identifies a restriction on trade in specimens of vicuña addressed in this paragraph (m) if any of the following criteria are met:

(i) The country is listed in a Notification to the Parties by the CITES Secretariat as lacking a designated Management or Scientific Authority that issues CITES documents or their equivalent.

(ii) The country is identified in any action adopted by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention, the Convention's Standing Committee, or in a Notification issued by the CITES Secretariat, whereby Parties are asked not to accept shipments of specimens of any CITES-listed species from the country in question.

(iii) The Service's Division of Scientific Authority administratively determines that the conservation or management status of threatened vicuña populations in a range country has changed, such that continued recovery of the vicuña population in that country may be compromised, as a result of one or more of the following factors:

(A) A change in range country laws or regulations that lessens protection for vicuña;

(B) A change in range country management programs that lessens protection for vicuña;

(C) A documented decline in wild vicuña population numbers;

(D) A documented increase in poaching of vicuña;

(E) A documented decline in vicuña habitat quality or quantity; or

(F) Other natural or man-made factors affecting the species' recovery.

(iv) A listing of all countries that have not designated both a Management Authority and Scientific Authority, or that have been identified as a country from which Parties should not accept permits is available by writing: The Division of Management Authority, ARLSQ Room 700, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arlington, VA 22203. The list is also on our website (http://international.fws.gov).

(4) What must vicuña range countries do in order to be authorized under the special rule to export to the United States?—(i) Annual Report. Range country governments (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru) wishing to export specimens of vicuña to the United States will need to provide an annual report containing the most recent information available on the status of the species, following the information guidelines specified below. The first submission of a status report will be required as of July 1, 2003, and every year thereafter on the anniversary of that date. For each range country, the following information should be provided in the annual report:

(A) A description of any revisions to the management program, especially any changes in management approaches or emphasis;

(B) New information obtained in the last year on vicuña distribution, population status, or population trends, for the country as a whole or for specific protected areas, and a detailed description of the methodology used to obtain such information;

(C) Results of any research projects concluded in the last year on the biology of vicuña in the wild, particularly its population biology, habitat use, and genetics, and a description of any new research projects undertaken on the biology of vicuña in the wild, particularly its population biology, habitat use, and genetics;

(D) A description of any changes to national and/or provincial laws and programs relating to vicuña conservation, in particular those laws and regulations related to harvest and use of the vicuña, and export of vicuña parts and products;

(E) A description of any changes in the number or size of natural reserves or national parks that provide protected habitat for the vicuña;

(F) A summary of law enforcement activities undertaken in the last year, and a description of any changes in programs to prevent poaching, smuggling, and illegal commercialization of the vicuña;

(G) A description of the current management and harvest (or “sustainable use”) programs for wild populations of the vicuña, including: any changes in the location and population size of wild populations being managed for sustainable use; any changes in the harvest management practices being used for each population; any changes in current harvest quotas for wild populations, if any; any changes in protocols for translocations undertaken as part of the use program; a summary of the specific financial costs of and revenues generated by the sustainable use program over the last year; and a summary of documented conservation benefits resulting from the sustainable use program over the last year;

(H) A description of current management and harvest (or “sustainable use”) programs for captive and so-called “semi-captive” populations of the vicuña, including: any changes in the number and location of all captive and “semi-captive” populations; any changes in the size (ha) of each captive enclosure and the number of vicuña maintained therein; any changes in protocols for translocations undertaken as part of the use program; a summary of the financial costs of and revenues generated by the sustainable use program over the last year; and documented conservation benefits resulting from the sustainable use program over the last year (information on captive and “semi-captive” populations must be separate from that provided for wild populations); and

(I) Export data for the last year.

(ii) The Service's Division of Scientific Authority will conduct a review every 2 years, using information in the annual reports, to determine whether range country management programs are effectively achieving conservation benefits for the vicuña. Failure to submit an annual report could result in a restriction on trade in specimens of vicuña as addressed in paragraph (m)(3) of this section. Based on information contained in the annual reports and any other pertinent information it has available, the Service may restrict trade from a range country, as addressed in paragraph (m)(3) of this section, if it determines that the conservation or management status of threatened vicuña populations in a range country has changed, such that continued recovery of the vicuña population in that country may be compromised. Trade restrictions may result from one or more of the following factors:

(A) A change in range country laws or regulations that lessens protection for vicuña;

(B) A change in range country management programs that lessens protection for vicuña;

(C) A documented decline in wild vicuña population numbers;

(D) A documented increase in poaching of vicuña;

(E) A documented decline in vicuña habitat quality or quantity; or

(F) Other natural or man-made factors affecting the species' recovery.

(n)-(o) [Reserved]

(p) Northern sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni).

(1) To what population of sea otter does this special rule apply? The regulations in paragraph (p) of this section apply to the southwest Alaska distinct population segment (DPS) of the northern sea otter as set forth at §17.11(h) of this part.

(2) What provisions apply to this DPS? Except as noted in paragraph (p)(3) of this section, all prohibitions and provisions of §§17.31 and 17.32 of this part apply to the southwest Alaska DPS of the northern sea otter.

(3) What additional activities are allowed for this DPS? In addition to the activities authorized under paragraph (p)(2) of this section, you may conduct any activity authorized or exempted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.) with a part or product of a southwest Alaska DPS northern sea otter, provided that:

(i) The product qualifies as an authentic native article of handicrafts or clothing as defined in §17.3 of this part; and

(A) It was created by an Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who is an Alaskan

Native, and

(B) It is not being exported or imported for commercial purposes; or

(ii) The part or product is owned by an Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who is an Alaskan Native and resides in Alaska, or by a Native inhabitant of Russia, Canada, or Greenland, and is part of a cultural exchange; or

(iii) The product is owned by a Native inhabitant of Russia, Canada, or Greenland, and is in conjunction with travel for noncommercial purposes; or

(iv) The part or product has been received or acquired by a person registered as an agent or tannery under §18.23 of this subchapter.

(4) What other wildlife regulations may apply? All applicable provisions of 50 CFR parts 14, 18, and 23 must be met.

(q) Polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

(1) Except as noted in paragraphs (q)(2) and (4) of this section, all prohibitions and provisions of §§17.31 and 17.32 of this part apply to the polar bear.

(2) None of the prohibitions in §17.31 of this part apply to any activity that is authorized or exempted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.), the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) (27 U.S.T. 1087), or both, provided that the person carrying out the activity has complied with all terms and conditions that apply to that activity under the provisions of the MMPA and CITES and their implementing regulations.

(3) All applicable provisions of 50 CFR parts 14, 18, and 23 must be met.

(4) None of the prohibitions in §17.31of this part apply to any taking of polar bears that is incidental to, but not the purpose of, carrying out an otherwise lawful activity within the United States, except for any incidental taking caused by activities in areas subject to the jurisdiction or sovereign rights of the United States within the current range of the polar bear.

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §17.40, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§17.41   Special rules—birds.

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 20084, April 10, 2014.

(a) Streaked horned lark (Eremophila alpestris strigata). (1) Which populations of the streaked horned lark are covered by this special rule? The components of this special rule that apply to airport management and noxious weed control cover the rangewide distribution of this bird; the agricultural component applies only to the Willamette Valley in Oregon.

(2) What activities are prohibited? Except as noted in paragraphs (a)(3), (4), and (5) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 apply to the streaked horned lark.

(3) What activities are allowed on airports on non-Federal lands? (i) Incidental take of the streaked horned lark will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from routine management activities associated with airport operations to minimize hazardous wildlife, consistent with regulations at 14 CFR 139.337.

(ii) Hazardous wildlife is defined by the Federal Aviation Administration as species of wildlife, including feral animals and domesticated animals not under control, that are associated with aircraft strike problems, are capable of causing structural damage to airport facilities, or act as attractants to other wildlife that pose a strike hazard. Routine management activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

(A) Routine management, repair, and maintenance of roads and runways (does not include upgrades or construction of new roads or runways);

(B) Control and management of vegetation (grass, weeds, shrubs, and trees) through mowing, discing, herbicide application, or burning;

(C) Hazing of hazardous wildlife; and

(D) Habitat modification and management of sources of forage, water, and shelter to reduce the attractiveness of the area around the airport for hazardous wildlife.

(iii) Incidental take of larks caused by accidental aircraft strikes at airports on non-Federal lands is also exempted from the prohibitions of section 9 of the Act.

(4) What agricultural activities are allowed on non-Federal land in the Willamette Valley in Oregon? Incidental take of streaked horned lark will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from accepted agricultural (farming) practices implemented on farms consistent with State laws on non-Federal lands.

(i) For the purposes of this special rule, farm means any facility, including land, buildings, watercourses and appurtenances, used in the commercial production of crops, nursery stock, livestock, poultry, livestock products, poultry products, vermiculture products, or the propagation and raising of nursery stock.

(ii) For the purposes of this special rule, an agricultural (farming) practice means a mode of operation on a farm that:

(A) Is or may be used on a farm of a similar nature;

(B) Is a generally accepted, reasonable, and prudent method for the operation of the farm to obtain a profit in money;

(C) Is or may become a generally accepted, reasonable, and prudent method in conjunction with farm use;

(D) Complies with applicable State laws; and

(E) Is done in a reasonable and prudent manner.

(iii) Accepted agricultural (farming) practices include, but are not limited to, the following activities:

(A) Planting, harvesting, rotation, mowing, tilling, discing, burning, and herbicide application to crops;

(B) Normal transportation activities, and repair and maintenance of unimproved farm roads (this exemption does not include improvement or construction of new roads) and graveled margins of rural roads;

(C) Livestock grazing according to normally acceptable and established levels;

(D) Hazing of geese or predators; and

(E) Maintenance of irrigation and drainage systems.

(5) What noxious weed control activities are allowed on non-Federal lands? Incidental take of streaked horned lark will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from routine removal or other management of noxious weeds. Routine removal or other management of noxious weeds are limited to the following, and must be conducted in such a way that impacts to non-target plants are avoided to the maximum extent practicable:

(i) Mowing;

(ii) Herbicide and fungicide application;

(iii) Fumigation; and

(iv) Burning.

(b) Coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica). (1) Except as noted in paragraphs (b)(2) and (3) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31(a) and (b) shall apply to the coastal California gnatcatcher.

(2) Incidental take of the coastal California gnatcatcher will not be considered a violation of section 9 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), if it results from activities conducted pursuant to the State of California's Natural Community Conservation Planning Act of 1991 (NCCP), and in accordance with a NCCP plan for the protection of coastal sage scrub habitat, prepared consistent with the State's NCCP Conservation and Process Guidelines, provided that:

(i) The NCCP plan has been prepared, approved, and implemented pursuant to California Fish and Game Code sections 2800-2840; and

(ii) The Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has issued written concurrence that the NCCP plan meets the standards set forth in 50 CFR 17.32(b)(2). The Service shall issue its concurrence pursuant to the provisions of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), dated December 4, 1991, between the California Department of Fish and Game and the Service regarding coastal sage scrub natural community conservation planning in southern California. (Copies of the State's NCCP Conservation and Process Guidelines and the MOU are available from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Carlsbad Field Office, 2730 Loker Avenue West, Carlsbad, CA 92008.) The Service shall monitor the implementation of the NCCP plan and may revoke its concurrence under this paragraph (b)(2)(ii) if the NCCP plan, as implemented, fails to adhere to the standards set forth in 50 CFR 17.32(b)(2).

(3) During the period that a NCCP plan referred to in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is being prepared, incidental take of the coastal California gnatcatcher will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act if such take occurs within an area under the jurisdiction of a local government agency that is enrolled and actively engaged in the preparation of such a plan and such take results from activities conducted in accordance with the NCCP Conservation Guidelines and Process Guidelines.

(4) The Service will monitor the implementation of the NCCP Conservation and Process Guidelines as a whole, and will conduct a review every 6 months to determine whether the guidelines, as implemented, are effective in progressing toward or meeting regional and subregional conservation objectives during the interim planning period. If the Service determines that the guidelines are not effecting adequate progress toward or meeting regional and subregional conservation objectives, the Service will consult with the California Department of Fish and Game pursuant to the MOU to seek appropriate modification of the guidelines or their application as defined therein. If appropriate modification of the guidelines or their application as defined therein does not occur, the Service may revoke the interim take provisions of this special rule on a subregional or subarea basis. The Service will publish the findings for revocation in the Federal Register and provide for a 30-day public comment period prior to the effective date for revoking the provisions of the special rule in a particular area. Revocation would result in the reinstatement of the take prohibitions set forth under 50 CFR 17.31(a) and (b) in the affected NCCP area.

(c) The following species in the parrot family: Salmon-crested cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) and yellow-billed parrot (Amazona collaria).

(1) Except as noted in paragraphs (c)(2) and (3) of this section, all prohibitions and provisions of §§17.31 and 17.32 of this part apply to these species.

(2) Import and export. You may import or export a specimen without a permit issued under §17.32 of this part only when the provisions of parts 13, 14, 15, and 23 of this chapter have been met and you meet the following requirements:

(i) Captive-bred specimens: The source code on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) document accompanying the specimen must be “F” (captive born), “C” (bred in captivity), or “D” (bred in captivity for commercial purposes) (see 50 CFR 23.24); or

(ii) Specimens held in captivity prior to certain dates: You must provide documentation to demonstrate that the specimen was held in captivity prior to the applicable date specified in paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) or (B) of this section. Such documentation may include copies of receipts, accession or veterinary records, CITES documents, or wildlife declaration forms, which must be dated prior to the specified dates.

(A) For salmon-crested cockatoos: January 18, 1990 (the date this species was transferred to CITES Appendix I).

(B) For yellow-billed parrots: April 11, 2013 (the date this species was listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act) (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.)).

(3) Interstate commerce. Except where use after import is restricted under §23.55 of this chapter, you may deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate commerce and in the course of a commercial activity, or sell or offer to sell, in interstate commerce the species listed in this paragraph (c) without a permit under the Act.

[43 FR 6233, Feb. 14, 1978, as amended at 58 FR 65095, Dec. 10, 1993; 60 FR 36010, July 12, 1995; 72 FR 37372, July 9, 2007; 73 FR 23970, May 1, 2008; 76 FR 30780, May 26, 2011; 76 FR 54713, Sept. 2, 2011; 78 FR 15641, Mar. 12, 2013; 78 FR 61502, Oct. 3, 2013]

§17.42   Special rules—reptiles.

(a) American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)—(1) Definitions. For purposes of this paragraph (a) the following definitions apply:

(i) American alligator means any specimen of the species Alligator mississippiensis, whether alive or dead, including any skin, part, product, egg, or offspring thereof held in captivity or from the wild.

(ii) The definitions of crocodilian skins and crocodilian parts in §23.70(b) of this subchapter apply to this paragraph (a).

(2) Taking. No person may take any American alligator, except:

(i) Any employee or agent of the Service, any other Federal land management agency, or a State conservation agency, who is designated by the agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of official duties, take an American alligator.

(ii) Any person may take an American alligator in the wild, or one which was born in captivity or lawfully placed in captivity, and may deliver, receive, carry, transport, ship, sell, offer to sell, purchase, or offer to purchase such alligator in interstate or foreign commerce, by any means whatsoever and in the course of a commercial activity in accordance with the laws and regulations of the State of taking subject to the following conditions:

(A) Any skin of an American alligator may be sold or otherwise transferred only if the State or Tribe of taking requires skins to be tagged by State or tribal officials or under State or tribal supervision with a Service-approved tag in accordance with the requirements in part 23 of this subchapter; and

(B) Any American alligator specimen may be sold or otherwise transferred only in accordance with the laws and regulations of the State or Tribe in which the taking occurs and the State or Tribe in which the sale or transfer occurs.

(3) Import and export. Any person may import or export an American alligator specimen provided that it is in accordance with part 23 of this subchapter.

(4) Recordkeeping. (i) Any person not holding an import/export license issued by the Service under part 14 of this subchapter and who imports, exports, or obtains permits under part 23 of this subchapter for the import or export of American alligator shall keep such records as are otherwise required to be maintained by all import/export licensees under part 14 of this subchapter. Such records shall be maintained as in the normal course of business, reproducible in the English language, and retained for 5 years from the date of each transaction.

(ii) Subject to applicable limitations of law, duly authorized officers at all reasonable times shall, upon notice, be afforded access to examine such records required to be kept under paragraph (a)(4)(i) of this section, and an opportunity to copy such records.

(b) Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) (these do not include the populations listed as endangered in §17.11).

(1) Prohibitions. Subject to the permits allowable under the following paragraph (b)(2) of this section, all of the provisions set forth in §17.31 (which incorporate portions of §17.21) shall apply to this wildlife with the following exceptions:

(i) Section 17.21(c)(2) (self-defense) is not applicable.

(ii) In §17.21(c)(3)(i), the word “orphaned” is replaced by the word “stranded.”

(iii) Delete §17.21(c)(3)(iv) (Wildlife threatening human safety).

(iv) [Reserved]

(v) The prohibition against taking shall not apply to incidental catches, as specified in 50 CFR 227.72(e).

(vi) The prohibition against taking within the United States or the territorial sea of the United States shall not apply to subsistence taking, as specified in 50 CFR 227.72(f).

(2) Permits. (i) For those activities which come under the jurisdiction of the Service, only permits for scientific purposes, enhancement of propagation or survival, zoological exhibition or educational purposes, are available under §17.32. Procedures for issuance of permits are found in §17.32 and, for those activities which come under the jurisdiction of the National Marine Fisheries Service, subpart E of part 220. All the provisions of §17.32 apply to permits issued by the Service.

(c) Threatened crocodilians—(1) What are the definitions of terms used in this paragraph (c)?

(i) Threatened crocodilian means any live or dead specimen of the following species:

(A) Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris) originating in Argentina;

(B) Brown caiman (Caiman crocodilus fuscus, including Caiman crocodilus chiapasius);

(C) Common caiman (Caiman crocodilus crocodilus);

(D) Yacare caiman (Caiman yacare);

(E) Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus); and

(F) Saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) originating in Australia (also referred to as Australian saltwater crocodile).

(ii) The definitions of crocodilian skins and crocodilian parts in §23.70(b) and re-export in §23.5 of this subchapter apply to this paragraph (c).

(2) What activities involving threatened crocodilians are prohibited by this rule? (i) All provisions of §§17.31 and 17.32 apply to live specimens, including viable eggs, of all threatened crocodilians and to any specimen of the Appendix-I Nile crocodile.

(ii) Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section, the following prohibitions apply to threatened crocodilians.

(A) Import, export, and re-export. Except as provided in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, it is unlawful to import, export, or re-export, or attempt to import, export, or re-export without valid permits as required under parts 17 and 23 of this subchapter any threatened crocodilians, including their skins, parts, and products.

(B) Commercial activity. Except as provided in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, it is unlawful, in the course of a commercial activity, to sell or offer for sale, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce any threatened crocodilians, including their skins, parts, and products.

(C) It is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to commit, attempt to commit, solicit to commit, or cause to be committed any acts described in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) and (c)(2)(ii)(A) and (B) of this section.

(3) What activities involving threatened crocodilians are allowed by this rule? Except as provided in (c)(2)(i), you may import, export, or re-export, or sell or offer for sale, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce and in the course of a commercial activity, threatened crocodilian skins, parts, and products without a threatened species permit otherwise required under §17.32 provided the requirements of parts 13, 14, and 23 of this subchapter and the requirements of paragraphs (c)(3) and (4) of this section have been met.

(i) Skins and parts. Except as provided in (c)(3)(ii) of this section, the import, export, or re-export of threatened crocodilian skins and crocodilian parts is allowed provided the following conditions are met:

(A) Each crocodilian skin and crocodilian part imported, exported, or re-exported must be tagged or labeled in accordance with §23.70 of this subchapter.

(B) Any countries re-exporting crocodilian skins or parts must have implemented an administrative system for the effective matching of imports and re-exports.

(C) If a shipment contains more than 25 percent replacement tags, the U.S. Management Authority will consult with the Management Authority of the re-exporting country before clearing the shipment. Such shipments may be seized if we determine that the requirements of the Convention have not been met.

(D) The country of origin and any intermediary country(s) must be effectively implementing the Convention. If we receive persuasive information from the CITES Secretariat or other reliable sources that a specific country is not effectively implementing the Convention, we will prohibit or restrict imports from such country(s) as appropriate for the conservation of the species.

(ii) Meat, skulls, scientific specimens, products, and noncommercial personal or household effects. The tagging requirements in paragraph (c)(3)(i) of this section for skins and parts do not apply to the import, export, or re-export of threatened crocodilian meat, skulls, scientific specimens, or products or to the noncommercial import, export, or re-export of personal effects in accompanying baggage or household effects.

(4) When and how will the Service inform the public of additional restrictions in trade of threatened crocodilians? Except in rare cases involving extenuating circumstances that do not adversely affect the conservation of the species, the Service will issue an information bulletin (posted on our websites, http://www.fws.gov/le and http://www.fws.gov/international) announcing additional restrictions on trade of specimens of threatened crocodilians if any of the following criteria are met:

(i) The country is listed in a Notification to the Parties by the CITES Secretariat as not having designated Management and Scientific Authorities.

(ii) The country is identified in any action adopted by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention, the Standing Committee, or in a Notification issued by the CITES Secretariat, whereby Parties are asked not to accept shipments of specimens of any CITES species from the country in question or of any crocodilian species listed in the CITES Appendices.

(iii) We determine, based on information from the CITES Secretariat or other reliable sources, that the country is not effectively implementing the provisions of the Convention.

(5) Reporting requirements for yacare caiman range countries—(i) Biennial reports. Range countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay) wishing to export specimens of yacare caiman to the United States for commercial purposes must provide a biennial report containing the most recent information available on the status of the species. The first submission of a status report will be required as of December 31, 2001, and every 2 years thereafter on the anniversary of that date. For each range country, all of the following information must be included in the report.

(A) Recent distribution and population data, and a description of the methodology used to obtain such estimates.

(B) Description of research projects currently being conducted related to the biology of the species in the wild, particularly reproductive biology (for example, age or size when animals become sexually mature, number of clutches per season, number of eggs per clutch, survival of eggs, survival of hatchlings).

(C) Description of laws and programs regulating harvest, including approximate acreage of land set aside as natural reserves or national parks that provide protected habitat for yacare caiman.

(D) Description of current sustainable harvest programs, including ranching (captive rearing of specimens collected from the wild as eggs or juveniles) and farming (captive-breeding) programs.

(E) Current harvest quotas for wild populations.

(F) Export data for the last 2 years. Information should be organized according to the source of specimens such as wild-caught, captive-reared, or captive-bred.

(ii) Review and restrictions. The U.S. Scientific Authority will conduct a review every 2 years, using information in the biennial reports and other available information, to determine whether range country management programs are effectively achieving conservation benefits for the yacare caiman. Based on the best available information, we may restrict trade from a range country if we determine that the conservation or management status of threatened yacare caiman populations has changed, such that continued recovery of the population in that country may be compromised. Trade restrictions, as addressed in paragraph (c)(4) of this section, may be implemented based on one or more of the following factors:

(A) Failure to submit the reports described above, or failure to respond to requests for additional information.

(B) A change in range country laws or regulations that lessens protection for yacare caiman.

(C) A change in range country management programs that lessens protection for the species.

(D) A documented decline in wild population numbers.

(E) A documented increase in poaching.

(F) A documented decline in habitat quality or quantity.

(G) Other natural or manmade factors affecting the species' recovery.

(d) Blue-tailed mole skink (Eumeces egregius lividus) and sand skink (Neoseps reynoldsi). (1) No person shall take these species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations for educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to taking of these species is also a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatever, any such species taken in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraph (c) (1) through (3) of this section.

(5) Taking of these species for purposes other than those described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, including taking incidental to carrying out otherwise lawful activities, is prohibited except when permitted under §§17.23 and 17.32.

(e) Desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)—(1) Definition. For the purposes of this paragraph (e) “desert tortoise” shall mean any member of the species Gopherus agassizii, whether alive or dead, and any part, product, egg, or offspring thereof, found outside of Arizona (south and east of the Colorado River) and Mexico, regardless of natal origin or place of removal from the wild.

(2) Applicable provisions. The provisions of §17.31-17.32 shall apply to any desert tortoise subject to this paragraph (e).

(f) Bog turtle (Clemmys muhlenbergii), southern population—(1) Definitions of terms. For the purposes of this paragraph (f): Bog turtle of the southern population means any member of the species Clemmys muhlenbergii, within Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, regardless of whether in the wild or captivity, and also applies to the progeny of any such turtle.

(2) Prohibitions. Except as provided in paragraph (f)(3) of this section, the provisions of Sec. 17.31 (a) and (b) of this part applies to bog turtles of the southern population (see also 50 CFR part 23).

(3) Take. Incidental take, that is, take that results from, but is not the purpose of, carrying out an otherwise lawful activity, does not apply to bog turtles of the southern population.

(g) [Reserved]

[42 FR 2076, Jan. 10, 1977, as amended at 43 FR 32809, July 28, 1978; 44 FR 59084, Oct. 12, 1979; 45 FR 17589, Mar. 19, 1980; 45 FR 78154, Nov. 25, 1980; 48 FR 46336, Oct. 12, 1983; 50 FR 25678, June 20, 1985; 50 FR 45409, Oct. 31, 1985; 52 FR 21063, June 4, 1987; 52 FR 42662, Nov. 6, 1987; 55 FR 12191, Apr. 2, 1990; 61 FR 32366, June 24, 1996; 62 FR 59622, Nov. 4, 1997; 65 FR 25879, May 4, 2000; 72 FR 48446, Aug. 23, 2007; 78 FR 38190, June 25, 2013]

§17.43   Special rules—amphibians.

(a) San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana). (1) All provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that it may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(b) Chiricahua leopard frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis).

(1) What activities are prohibited? Except as noted in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 will apply to the Chiricahua leopard frog.

(2) What activities are allowed on private, State, or Tribal land? Incidental take of the Chiricahua leopard frog will not be considered a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the take results from livestock use at or maintenance activities of livestock tanks located on private, State, or Tribal lands. A livestock tank is defined as an existing or future impoundment in an ephemeral drainage or upland site constructed primarily as a watering site for livestock.

(c) California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense).

(1) Which populations of the California tiger salamander are covered by this special rule? This rule covers the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) rangewide.

(2) What activities are prohibited? Except as noted in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 will apply to the California tiger salamander.

(3) What activities are allowed on private or Tribal land? Incidental take of the California tiger salamander will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from routine ranching activities located on private or Tribal lands. Routine ranching activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

(i) Livestock grazing according to normally acceptable and established levels of intensity in terms of the number of head of livestock per acre of rangeland;

(ii) Control of ground-burrowing rodents using poisonous grain according to the labeled directions and local, State, and Federal regulations and guidelines (The use of toxic or suffocating gases is not exempt from the prohibitions due to their nontarget-specific mode of action.);

(iii) Control and management of burrow complexes using discing and grading to destroy burrows and fill openings;

(iv) Routine management and maintenance of stock ponds and berms to maintain livestock water supplies (This exemption does not include the intentional introduction of species into a stock pond that may prey on California tiger salamander adults, larvae, or eggs.);

(v) Routine maintenance or construction of fences for grazing management;

(vi) Planting, harvest, or rotation of unirrigated forage crops as part of a rangeland livestock operation;

(vii) Maintenance and construction of livestock management facilities such as corrals, sheds, and other ranch outbuildings;

(viii) Repair and maintenance of unimproved ranch roads (This exemption does not include improvement, upgrade, or construction of new roads.);

(ix) Discing of fencelines or perimeter areas for fire prevention control;

(x) Placement of mineral supplements; and

(xi) Control and management of noxious weeds.

(d) California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii)—(1) Which populations of the California red-legged frog are covered by this special rule? This rule covers the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) rangewide.

(2) What activities are prohibited? Except as noted in paragraph (d)(3) of this section, all prohibitions of §17.31 will apply to the California red-legged frog.

(3) What activities are allowed on private or Tribal land? Incidental take of the California red-legged frog will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from routine ranching activities located on private or Tribal lands. Routine ranching activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

(i) Livestock grazing according to normally acceptable and established levels of intensity in terms of the number of head of livestock per acre of rangeland;

(ii) Control of ground-burrowing rodents using poisonous grain according to the labeled directions and local, State, and Federal regulations and guidelines (In areas where California red-legged frogs and California tiger salamanders coexist, the use of toxic or suffocating gases is not exempt from the prohibitions due to their nontarget-specific mode of action.);

(iii) Control and management of burrow complexes using discing and grading to destroy burrows and fill openings (This exemption does not apply to areas within 0.7 mi (1.2 km) of known or potential California red-legged frog breeding ponds.);

(iv) Routine management and maintenance of stock ponds and berms to maintain livestock water supplies (This exemption does not include the intentional introduction of species into a stock pond (including non-native fish and bullfrogs) that may prey on California red-legged frog adults, larvae, or eggs.);

(v) Routine maintenance or construction of fences for grazing management;

(vi) Planting, harvest, or rotation of unirrigated forage crops as part of a rangeland livestock operation;

(vii) Maintenance and construction of livestock management facilities such as corrals, sheds, and other ranch outbuildings;

(viii) Repair and maintenance of unimproved ranch roads (This exemption does not include improvement, upgrade, or construction of new roads.);

(ix) Discing of fencelines or perimeter areas for fire prevention control;

(x) Placement of mineral supplements; and

(xi) Control and management of noxious weeds.

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975, as amended at 45 FR 47363, July 14, 1980; 67 FR 40811, June 13, 2002; 69 FR 47248, Aug. 4, 2004; 71 FR 19293, Apr. 13, 2006; 77 FR 16375, Mar. 20, 2012]

§17.44   Special rules—fishes.

(a) Lahontan cutthroat trout, Paiute cutthroat trout, and Arizona trout (Salmo clarki henshawi, Salmo clarki seleniris, and Salmo apache). (1) All the provisions of §17.31 apply to these species, except that they may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(b) Bayou darter (Etheostoma rubrum). (1) All the provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that they may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(c) Slender chub (Hybopsis cahni), spotfin chub (Erimonax monachus), slackwater darter (Etheostoma boschungi), and yellowfin madtom (Noturus flavipinnis). (1) All the provisions of §17.31 apply to these species, except that they may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(d) Leopard darter (Percina pantherina). (1) All provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that it may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(e) Little Kern golden trout (Salmo aguabonita whitei). (1) All provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that it may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(f) Greenback cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki stomias). (1) All provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that it may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(g) Chihuahua chub (Gila nigrescens). (1) All provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that it may be taken in accordance with applicable State law.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(h) Yaqui catfish (Ictalurus pricei) and beautiful shiner (Notropis formosus). (1) All provisions of §17.31 apply to these species, except that they may be taken for educational, scientific, or conservation purposes in accordance with applicable Arizona State laws and regulations.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(i) Big Spring spinedace (Lepidomeda mollispinis pratensis). (1) All the provisions of §17.31 apply to this species, except that it may be taken in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances: educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(j) Hutton tui chub (Gila bicolor subspecies) and Foskett speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus subspecies). (1) No person shall take these species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances: for educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of these species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (j) (1) through (3) of this section.

(k) Niangua darter, Etheostoma nianguae. (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances: educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (k) (1) through (3) of this section.

(l) Warner sucker (Catostomus warnerensis). (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances:

(i) For educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act;

(ii) Incidental to State-permitted recreational fishing activities, provided that the individual fish taken is immediately returned to its habitat.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (l) (1) through (3) of this section.

(m) Desert dace (Eremichthys acros). (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances: For educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (m) (1) through (3) of this section.

(n) Railroad Valley springfish (Crenichthys nevadae). (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances: for educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (n) (1) through (3) of this section.

(o) Sonora chub (Gila ditaenia). (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances:

(i) For educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act; or,

(ii) Incidental to State-permitted recreational fishing activities, provided that the individual fish taken is immediately returned to its habitat.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (o) (1) through (3) of this section.

(p)-(q) [Reserved]

(r) Pecos bluntnose shiner (Notropis simus pecosensis). (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances:

(i) For educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act; or,

(ii) Incidental to State permitted recreational fishing activities, provided that the individual fish taken is immediately returned to its habitat.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (r) (1) through (3) of this section.

(s) Waccamaw Silverside (Menidia extensa). (1) No person shall take the species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species will also be a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (s) (1) through (3) of this section.

(t) Little Colorado spinedace (Lepidomeda vittata). (1) No person shall take this species, except in accordance with applicable State Fish and Wildlife conservation laws and regulations in the following instances: for educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species is also a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of these regulations or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (t) (1) through (3) of this section.

(u) Pygmy sculpin (Cottus pygmaeus). The City of Anniston Water Works and Sewer Board will continue to use Coldwater Spring as a municipal water supply. Pumpage may remove all spring flow in excess of 3 cubic feet per second (1,938,000 gallons per day).

(v) Gulf sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus desotoi). (1) No person shall take this species, except in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations for educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, or other conservation purposes consistent with the Act.

(2) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to taking of this species is also a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(3) No person shall possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatever, any of this species taken in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(4) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (v)(1) through (3) of this section.

(5) Taking of this species for purposes other than those described in paragraph (v)(1) of this section, including taking incidental to otherwise lawful activities, is prohibited except when permitted under 50 CFR 17.32.

(w) What species are covered by this special rule? Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), wherever found in the coterminous lower 48 States, except in the Jarbidge River Basin in Nevada and Idaho (see 50 CFR 17.44(x)).

(1) What activities do we prohibit? Except as noted in paragraph (w)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of 50 CFR 17.31 and exemptions of 50 CFR 17.32 shall apply to the bull trout in the coterminous United States as defined in paragraph (w) of this section.

(i) No person may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of this section or in violation of applicable State, National Park Service, and Native American Tribal fish and conservation laws and regulations.

(ii) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense listed in this special rule.

(2) What activities do we allow? In the following instances you may take this species in accordance with applicable State, National Park Service, and Native American Tribal fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations, as constituted in all respects relevant to protection of bull trout in effect on November 1, 1999:

(i) Educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act; or

(ii) Fishing activities authorized under State, National Park Service, or Native American Tribal laws and regulations;

(3) How does this rule relate to State protective regulations? Any violation of applicable State, National Park Service, or Native American Tribal fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species is also a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(x) Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), Jarbidge River population segment. (1) Prohibitions. Except as noted in paragraph (x)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of 50 CFR 17.31 and exemptions of 50 CFR 17.32 apply to the bull trout in the Jarbidge River population segment within the United States.

(2) Exceptions. No person may take this species, except in the following instances in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations relevant to protection of bull trout in effect on April 8, 1999.

(i) For educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Act;

(ii) Incidental to State-permitted recreational fishing activities, provided that any bull trout caught are immediately returned to the stream.

(iii) The exceptions in paragraphs (x)(2) (i) and (ii) of this section will be in effect until April 9, 2001. At that time, all take prohibitions of the Act will be reinstated for the Jarbidge River population segment unless exceptions to take prohibitions are otherwise provided through a subsequent special rule.

(3) Any violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species is also a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

(4) No person may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of this section or in violation of applicable State fish and conservation laws and regulations.

(5) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense defined in paragraphs (x)(2) through (4) of this section.

(y) Beluga sturgeon. This paragraph applies to the threatened beluga sturgeon (Huso huso).

(1) How are various terms defined in this special rule? In addition to the definitions specified in §10.12 of subchapter B of this chapter, we define certain terms that specifically apply to beluga sturgeon trade and this special rule as follows:

Aquacultured beluga sturgeon products. Eggs, larvae, fingerlings, or other products derived from Huso huso captive-bred or grown in captivity for commercial purposes starting at least at the F1 generation in captivity (i.e., captive-bred for at least one generation).

Beluga caviar. Processed unfertilized eggs from female Huso huso intended for human consumption, including products containing such eggs (e.g., cosmetics).

Beluga meat. Excised muscle tissue of Huso huso destined for human consumption.

Black Sea. The contiguous waters of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov.

CITES. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

Export. The transport of a beluga sturgeon specimen out of its country of origin.

Hatchery-origin beluga sturgeon. Specimens of Huso huso captive-bred solely in the littoral states, primarily for reintroduction and stock enhancement purposes. Such specimens can occur in the natural marine environment of the littoral states.

Live or living beluga sturgeon. Any living specimen of Huso huso, including viable unfertilized or fertilized eggs, larvae, fingerlings, juveniles, and adults.

Littoral states. Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Romania, Russian Federation, Serbia and Montenegro, Turkey, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine.

Re-export. Export of beluga sturgeon specimens that were previously imported.

Wild beluga sturgeon. Specimens of Huso huso born and reared in the natural marine environment within the current or former geographic range of the species.

(2) What activities involving beluga sturgeon are affected by this rule? (i) International trade in beluga sturgeon. Except as provided in paragraphs (y)(3) and (y)(5) of this section, all prohibitions and provisions of §§17.31(a) and 17.32 apply to the international trade in beluga sturgeon, including its parts and derivatives. Live beluga sturgeon remain subject to all the prohibitions and provisions of §§17.31(a) and 17.32.

(ii) Trade without CITES documents. Except as provided in paragraph (y)(3) of this section, you may not import, export, or re-export, or present for export or re-export, beluga sturgeon or beluga sturgeon products without valid CITES permits and other permits and licenses issued under parts 13, 17, and 23 of this chapter.

(iii) Commercial activity. Except as provided in paragraphs (y)(3) and (5) of this section and §17.32, you may not sell or offer for sale, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce in the course of a commercial activity any beluga sturgeon or beluga sturgeon products.

(iv) It is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to commit, attempt to commit, solicit to commit, or cause to be committed any acts described in paragraphs (y)(2)(ii) and (iii) of this section.

(3) What activities are exempted from threatened species permits by this rule? (i) Import, export or re-export, and interstate and foreign commerce involving certain caviar and meat obtained from beluga sturgeon. You may import, export or re-export, or conduct interstate or foreign commerce in beluga sturgeon caviar and meat without a threatened species permit issued according to §17.32 only if the caviar and meat are derived from wild or hatchery-origin beluga sturgeon that were caught and processed in the littoral states, or the caviar and meat are exempt from permits because they originate from qualifying aquaculture facilities outside of littoral states (see paragraph (y)(5) of this section). Also, the provisions in parts 13, 14, and 23 of this chapter and the following requirements must be met:

(A) Except for caviar contained in cosmetics, any beluga caviar must comply with all CITES labeling requirements, as defined in relevant Resolutions or Decisions of the Conference of the Parties, including beluga caviar in interstate commerce in the United States. All individuals or businesses in the United States wishing to engage in domestic interstate commerce of beluga sturgeon caviar must follow the CITES caviar-labeling requirements.

(B) The shipment must be accompanied by a valid CITES permit or certificate upon import, export, or re-export.

(C) For each shipment covered by this exemption, the country of origin and each country of re-export, and the country of import involved in the trade of a particular shipment, must have designated both a CITES Management Authority and Scientific Authority, and have not been identified by the CITES Conference of the Parties, the CITES Standing Committee, or in a Notification from the CITES Secretariat as a country from which Parties should not accept permits for beluga sturgeon or all CITES-listed species in general.

(D) The littoral state from which the beluga sturgeon caviar or meat originated has complied with all of the requirements shown in paragraph (y)(4) of this section, and none of the exporting, importing, or re-exporting countries involved in the commercial activity has been subject to an administrative trade restriction or suspension as outlined in paragraphs (y)(6) and (7) of this section.

(E) Any relevant aquaculture facility located outside of a littoral state has complied with all of the requirements shown in paragraph (y)(5) of this section.

(ii) Import and re-export of non-commercial personal or household effects. You may import, export or re-export, or conduct interstate or foreign commerce in beluga sturgeon personal or household effects without a threatened species permit issued according to §17.32. Also, for CITES permits, Article VII.3. of CITES recognizes a limited exemption for the international movement of personal and household effects, including specimens of beluga sturgeon.

(A) Stricter national measures. The exemption for personal and household effects does not apply if a country prohibits or restricts the import, export, or re-export of the item.

(1) You or your shipment must be accompanied by any document required by a country under its stricter national measures.

(2) In the United States, you must obtain any permission needed under other regulations in this subchapter.

(B) Required CITES documents. You must obtain a CITES document for personal or household effects and meet the requirements of this part if one of the following applies:

(1) The Management Authority of the importing, exporting, or re-exporting country requires a CITES document.

(2) You or your shipment does not meet all of the conditions for an exemption as provided in paragraphs (y)(3)(ii)(C) and (D) of this section.

(3) The personal or household effect exceeds 250 grams of beluga caviar. To import, export, or re-export more than 250 grams, you must have a valid CITES document for the entire quantity.

(C) Personal effects. You do not need a CITES document to import, export, or re-export any part, product, derivative, or manufactured article of a legally acquired beluga sturgeon specimen to or from the United States if all of the following conditions are met:

(1) No living beluga sturgeon is included.

(2) You personally own and possess the item for non-commercial purposes, including any item intended as a personal gift.

(3) The item and quantity of items are reasonably necessary or appropriate for the nature of your trip or stay.

(4) You are either wearing the item as clothing or an accessory or taking it as part of your personal baggage, which is being carried by you or checked as baggage on the same plane, boat, car, or train as you.

(5) The item was not mailed or shipped separately.

(D) Household effects. You do not need a CITES document to import, export, or re-export any part, product, derivative, or manufactured article of a legally acquired beluga sturgeon specimen that is part of a shipment of your household effects when moving your residence to or from the United States, if all of the following conditions are met:

(1) No living beluga sturgeon is included.

(2) You personally own the item and are moving it for non-commercial purposes.

(3) The item and quantity of items are reasonably necessary or appropriate for household use.

(4) You import, export, or re-export your household effects within 1 year of changing your residence from one country to another.

(5) The shipment, or shipments if you cannot move all of your household effects at one time, contains only items purchased, inherited, or otherwise acquired before you moved your residence.

(E) Trade restrictions. Regardless of the provisions above for personal and household effects, any trade suspension or trade restriction administratively imposed by the Service under paragraphs (y)(6) or (7) of this section could also apply to personal and household effects of beluga caviar.

(4) What must beluga sturgeon littoral states do to be authorized under the special rule to export to the United States? The following requirements apply to the littoral states wishing to export beluga caviar or beluga meat to the United States without the need for a threatened species permit issued under §17.32. These requirements apply to all shipments of beluga caviar and beluga meat that originate in the littoral states, even if the shipments are re-exported to the United States via an intermediary country. (See paragraph (y)(7) of this section for more information on the Service's biennial reviews under the special rule.)

(i) Basin-wide beluga sturgeon management plans. By September 6, 2005, each littoral state wishing to export beluga caviar or beluga meat to the United States without the need for a threatened species permit issued under §17.32 must submit to the Service's Division of Scientific Authority a copy of a cooperative management plan for its respective basin (i.e., Black Sea or Caspian Sea) that addresses Huso huso conservation. Each of these two basin-wide management plans must be agreed to by all of the littoral states (not just exporting nations) in the Black Sea or the Caspian Sea, as appropriate. Upon receipt, the Division of Scientific Authority will review these basin-wide management plans within 90 days for completeness and clarity. If any elements of the management plans are missing or unclear, we will ask the appropriate littoral states to provide additional information within 60 days of the date we contact them. If the littoral states fail to respond or fail to submit basin-wide management plans by the specified deadline, or if we are unable to confirm that all littoral states are signatories to those plans, we will immediately suspend trade with all littoral states in the given basin (Caspian Sea or Black Sea) until we are satisfied that such management plans exist. Submission of documents in English may help expedite the Service's review. These cooperative management plans must contain the following elements:

(A) A clear statement of the recovery and management objectives of the plan, including a specification of the stock(s) concerned, a definition of what constitutes over-fishing for that stock, and a rebuilding objective and schedule for that stock;

(B) A statement of standard regulations and habitat improvement strategies (e.g., size limits, target harvest rates, quotas, seasons, fishing gear, effort caps, fish passage improvement, water quality controls) to be utilized by the nations involved;

(C) A complete statement of the specific regulatory, monitoring, and research requirements that each cooperating nation must implement to be in compliance with the management plan;

(D) A complete description of how stock survey data and fisheries data are used to establish annual catch and export quotas, including a full explanation of any models used and the assumptions underlying those models;

(E) Procedures under which the nations may implement and enforce alternative management measures that achieve the same conservation benefits for beluga sturgeon as the standards mentioned in paragraph (y)(4)(i)(B) of this section; and

(F) A complete schedule by which nations must take particular actions to be in compliance with the plan.

(ii) National regulations. By September 6, 2005, each littoral state wishing to export beluga caviar or beluga meat to the United States under this special rule must provide the Service's Division of Scientific Authority with copies of national legislation and regulations that implement the basin-wide cooperative management plan described in paragraph (y)(4)(i) of this section, including regulations pertaining to the harvest, trade, aquaculture, restocking, and processing of beluga sturgeon. Upon receipt, the Division of Scientific Authority will review these national laws and regulations within 90 days for completeness and clarity. If any elements of the national legislation or national fishery regulations are missing or unclear, we will ask the appropriate littoral states to provide additional information within 60 days of the date we contact them. If the littoral states fail to respond or fail to submit copies of national laws and regulations by the specified deadline, we will immediately suspend trade with the given littoral states until we are satisfied that such laws and regulations are in effect. Submission of documents in English may help expedite the Service's review.

(iii) Caviar labeling. All caviar shipments imported into the United States must follow the CITES caviar-labeling requirements as agreed to in the relevant Resolutions and Decisions of the CITES Parties. Current labeling requirements can be obtained by contacting the Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits—International, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 700, Arlington, VA 22203.

(iv) CITES compliance. Except as provided in paragraph (y)(3)(ii) of this section, all shipments of beluga sturgeon specimens, including those exempted from threatened species permits under this special rule, will require accompanying valid CITES permits and certificates upon import, export, or re-export.

(v) Initial reporting period. Until September 6, 2005, no threatened species permits will be required for the import, export, re-export, or interstate or foreign commerce of beluga sturgeon caviar and meat that originated in the littoral states, in order to provide the littoral states time to submit the required documentation. After this 6-month period, the exemption from threatened species permits will continue only while the Service reviews littoral state compliance with paragraphs (y)(4)(i) through (iv) of this section. If this review demonstrates that the provisions of this special rule are not met, the Service will announce and institute trade restrictions or suspensions in beluga sturgeon caviar or meat with one or more littoral states as per paragraph (y)(7) of this section.

(vi) Biennial reports. Littoral state governments wishing to export specimens of beluga sturgeon caviar or meat to the United States under this special rule must provide to the Service's Division of Scientific Authority reports containing the most recent information available on the status of the species, following the information guidelines specified below. The Service must receive the first report no later than December 1, 2005, and every 2 years thereafter on the anniversary of that date. Starting in December 2005, and thereafter on a biennial basis, the Service will review the national reports within 90 days of receiving them and any other pertinent information on wild beluga sturgeon conservation. If any elements of the biennial reports are missing or unclear, the Service will ask the appropriate littoral states to provide additional information within 60 days of the date we contact them. If the littoral states fail to respond or fail to submit biennial reports by the specified deadline, we will immediately suspend trade with the given littoral states (see paragraph (y)(7) of this section for details on how such a suspension would be instituted and announced). Submission of documents in English may help expedite the Service's review. We propose to use these reviews to determine whether littoral state management programs are leading to recovery of wild beluga sturgeon stocks. For each littoral state, the following information must be provided in the biennial reports:

(A) A description of the specific fishery regulations that affect the harvest of Huso huso in the respective littoral state, with any changes from the previous report highlighted;

(B) A description of any revisions to the cooperative management program mentioned in paragraph (y)(4)(i) of this section, including any new models, assumptions, or equations used to set harvest and export quotas;

(C) New information obtained in the last 2 years on beluga sturgeon distribution, stock size, models used for quota-setting, spawning activity, habitat use, hatchery programs and results, or other relevant subjects;

(D) A summary of law enforcement activities undertaken in the last 2 years, and a description of any changes in programs to prevent poaching and smuggling, including indicators of their effectiveness;

(E) A summary of the revenues generated by the commercial exploitation of beluga sturgeon in the respective littoral state, and a summary of any documented conservation benefits resulting from the commercial harvest program in that country (e.g., revenues allocated to hatchery and restocking programs or research programs); and

(F) Export data for the previous two calendar years.

(5) Can aquacultured beluga sturgeon products be exempt from threatened species permits if the products originate outside the littoral states? We will consider exemptions from threatened species permits for beluga caviar and meat obtained from aquaculture facilities outside the littoral states. These exemptions will be for individual facilities, and would allow aquacultured beluga caviar and meat originating from these facilities to be imported, exported, re-exported, or traded in interstate and foreign commerce without threatened species permits issued under Section 10 of the Act. Aquaculture facilities within the United States could also be exempt from prohibitions against take for purposes of harvesting caviar or meat (i.e., killing of beluga sturgeon), or for conducting activities involving research to enhance the survival or propagation of the species. Facilities outside the littoral states wishing to obtain such exemptions must submit a written request to the Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits—International, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 700, Arlington, VA 22203, and provide to the Service's Division of Scientific Authority, in Room 750 at the same address, information that shows, at a minimum, all of the following:

(i) The facility in question is using best management practices to prevent the escape of beluga sturgeon and disease pathogens into local ecosystems, as certified by the relevant regulatory agency. In the case of the United States, the relevant regulatory authority will be the state agency with jurisdiction over aquaculture. In the case of foreign aquaculture facilities outside the littoral states, the relevant regulatory agency will be the designated CITES Management Authority with jurisdiction over sturgeon. Best management practices that affect the applicant's facility must be part of the application and available for Service review.

(ii) The facility in question has entered into a formal agreement with one or more littoral states to study, protect, or otherwise enhance the survival of wild beluga sturgeon. Copies of such agreements must be provided.

(iii) The facility in question does not rely on wild beluga sturgeon for broodstock. Proof of broodstock origin, including relevant CITES permits that accompanied broodstock specimens upon import into the United States, must be part of the application.

(iv) Exemptions granted under paragraph (y)(5) of this section shall not apply to trade (import, export, re-export, or interstate and foreign commerce) in live beluga sturgeon, and may be revoked at any time if the Service determines that any of the criteria shown in paragraphs (y)(5)(i) through (iii) of this section are not met by the facility. Applicants will be required to submit biennial reports on their compliance with paragraphs (y)(5)(i) through (iii) of this section, starting on the second anniversary of any programmatic exemption granted to the applicants. These biennial reports must show that exempted facilities have actively cooperated with one or more littoral states in a meaningful way to support beluga sturgeon conservation. Any beluga caviar originating from aquaculture facilities outside the littoral states must comply with CITES caviar-labeling requirements, even in interstate commerce within the United States. We will publish an information notice if the Service grants a programmatic exemption to any aquaculture facility outside the littoral states, and announce such actions through our website and posting notices at our wildlife ports of entry. We will follow the provisions of paragraph (y)(7) of this section to announce restrictions or revocations of such programmatic exemptions, based on our review of facilities' biennial reports.

(6) How will the Service inform the public of CITES restrictions on trade in beluga sturgeon? We will issue an information bulletin that identifies a restriction or suspension of trade in specimens of beluga sturgeon and post it on our websites (http://le.fws.gov and http://international.fws.gov) and at our staffed wildlife ports of entry if any criterion in paragraphs (y)(6)(i) or (ii) of this section is met:

(i) The country is lacking a designated Management Authority or Scientific Authority for the issuance of valid CITES documents or their equivalent for beluga sturgeon.

(ii) The country is identified in any action adopted by the CITES Conference of the Parties, the CITES Standing Committee, or in a Notification to the Parties issued by the CITES Secretariat as a country from which Parties are asked not to accept shipments of specimens of beluga sturgeon or all CITES-listed species.

Note to paragraph (y)(6): A listing of all countries that have not designated either a Management Authority or Scientific Authority, or that have been identified as countries from which Parties should not accept permits, is available by writing to: Division of Management Authority, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 700, Arlington, Virginia 22203.

(7) How will the Service set trade restrictions or prohibitions under the special rule? The Service's Division of Scientific Authority will conduct a biennial review of beluga sturgeon conservation based on information in the cooperative basin-wide management plans, national regulations and laws, and biennial reports (submitted as per paragraph (y)(4) of this section, and, for aquaculture facilities, as per paragraph (y)(5)(iv) of this section). We will combine that review with a review of other relevant information (e.g., scientific literature, law enforcement data, government-to-government consultations) to determine whether littoral state management programs and aquaculture operations are effectively achieving conservation benefits for beluga sturgeon. Based on this information, or the failure to obtain it, the Service may restrict or prohibit trade from a littoral state, a re-exporting intermediary country, or an entire basin (i.e., the Caspian Sea or Black Sea) or a specific aquaculture facility outside the littoral states if we determine that the conservation or management status of beluga sturgeon has been adversely affected and the continued recovery of beluga sturgeon may be compromised. The decision to restrict or prohibit trade in beluga sturgeon products on a national, basin, or region-wide scale will depend on the scope of the problem observed, the magnitude of the threat to wild beluga sturgeon, and whether remedial action is necessary at a national, basin, or region-wide scale.

(i) Trade restrictions or suspensions will result basin-wide, for specific littoral states, or for non-littoral state aquaculture facilities under one or more of the following scenarios:

(A) Failure to submit any of the reports, legislation, and management plans described in paragraph (y)(4) of this section, or failure to respond to requests for additional information;

(B) A change in regional cooperative management that threatens the recovery of wild beluga sturgeon;

(C) A change in littoral state laws or regulations that compromises beluga sturgeon recovery or survival in the wild;

(D) Adoption of scientifically unsound hatchery practices or restocking programs for beluga sturgeon;

(E) A decline in wild Huso huso populations, as documented in national reports outlined above or the scientific literature, that goes unaddressed by regional or national management programs;

(F) Failure to address poaching or smuggling in beluga sturgeon, their parts, or products in the littoral states or re-exporting countries, as documented in national reports described above or other law enforcement sources;

(G) Failure of the littoral states to address the loss of beluga sturgeon habitat quality or quantity;

(H) Failure of the littoral states or re-exporting countries to follow the caviar-labeling recommendations of the CITES Parties (currently embodied in Resolution Conf. 12.7);

(I) Recommendations from the CITES Standing Committee to suspend trade in beluga sturgeon from one or more countries; or

(J) An aquaculture facility outside the littoral states has been issued a programmatic exemption from threatened species permits under paragraph (y)(5) of this section, but is not abiding by the provisions of paragraphs (y)(5)(i) through (iii) of this section, or, based on the biennial reports required under paragraph (y)(5) of this section, has not actively cooperated with one or more littoral states in a meaningful way to support beluga sturgeon conservation.

(K) Any other natural or human-induced phenomenon that threatens the survival or recovery of beluga sturgeon.

(ii) We will publish an information notice in the Federal Register, as well as on our Web site and at our wildlife ports of entry, if the Service's Division of Scientific Authority administratively suspends or restricts trade in beluga sturgeon products after determining that wild beluga sturgeon stock status worsens or threats to the species increase. This information notice will provide:

(A) The problem(s) identified in the biennial reports or other salient documents.

(B) The scope of the problem and the number of nations involved.

(C) The scope of the trade restriction or suspension we are imposing, including products covered, duration of the restriction or suspension, and criteria for lifting it and reinstating any exemption to threatened species permits.

(D) How the public can provide input, make comments, and recommend remedial action to withdraw the trade measures imposed.

(z) Gila trout (Oncorhynchus gilae). (1) Except as noted in paragraph (z)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of 50 CFR 17.31 and exemptions of 50 CFR 17.32 apply to the Gila trout.

(i) No person may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any such species taken in violation of this section or in violation of applicable fish and conservation laws and regulations promulgated by the States of New Mexico or Arizona.

(ii) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed any offense listed in paragraph (z)(1)(i) of this section.

(2) In the following instances you may take Gila trout in accordance with applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws and regulations to protect this species in the States of New Mexico or Arizona:

(i) Fishing activities authorized under New Mexico or Arizona laws and regulations; and

(ii) Educational purposes, scientific purposes, the enhancement of propagation or survival of the species, zoological exhibition, and other conservation purposes consistent with the Endangered Species Act.

(3) The four relict populations of Gila trout (Main Diamond Creek, South Diamond Creek, Spruce Creek, and Whiskey Creek) will not be opened to fishing.

(4) Any changes to State recreational fishing regulations will be made by the States in collaboration with the Service.

(5) Any violation of State applicable fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations with respect to the taking of this species is also a violation of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended.

(aa) Shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus). (1) Within the geographic areas set forth in paragraph (aa)(2) of this section, except as expressly noted in this paragraph, take of any shovelnose sturgeon, shovelnose-pallid sturgeon hybrids, or their roe associated with or related to a commercial fishing activity is prohibited. Capture of shovelnose sturgeon or shovelnose-pallid sturgeon hybrids in commercial fishing gear is not prohibited if it is accidental or incidental to otherwise legal commercial fishing activities, such as commercial fishing targeting nonsturgeon species, provided the animal is released immediately upon discovery, with all roe intact, at the point of capture.

(2) The shovelnose and shovelnose-pallid sturgeon hybrid populations covered by this special rule occur in portions of Arkansas, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Tennessee. The specific areas are:

(i) The portion of the Missouri River in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, and South Dakota;

(ii) The portion of the Mississippi River downstream from the Melvin Price Locks and Dam (Lock and Dam 26) in Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, and Tennessee;

(iii) The Platte River downstream of the Elkhorn River confluence in Nebraska;

(iv) The portion of the Kansas River downstream from the Bowersock Dam in Kansas;

(v) The Yellowstone River downstream of the Bighorn River confluence in North Dakota and Montana; and

(vi) The Atchafalaya River in Louisiana.

(3) A map showing the area covered by this special rule (the area of shared habitat between shovelnose and pallid sturgeon) follows:

eCFR graphic er01se10.000.gif

View or download PDF

(bb) Okaloosa darter (Etheostoma okaloosae).

(1) Except as noted in paragraphs (bb)(2) and (bb)(3) of this section, all prohibitions of 50 CFR 17.31 and exemptions of 50 CFR 17.32 apply to the Okaloosa darter.

(i) No person may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, ship, import, or export, by any means whatsoever, any Okaloosa darters taken in violation of this section or in violation of applicable State fish and wildlife conservation laws or regulations.

(ii) It is unlawful for any person to attempt to commit, solicit another to commit, or cause to be committed, any offense listed in this special rule.

(2) The following activities, which may result in incidental take of the Okaloosa darter, are allowed on Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), provided that the activities occur in accordance with applicable Federal, State, and local laws, and are consistent with a Service-approved Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan by Eglin AFB and with Eglin AFB's Threatened and Endangered Species Component Plan:

(i) Prescribed fire for land management to promote a healthy ecosystem;

(ii) Instream habitat restoration;

(iii) Unpaved range road stabilization; and

(iv) Removal or replacement of culverts for the purpose of road decommissioning, improving fish passage, or enhancing stream habitat.

(3) Scientific research and monitoring activities that may result in incidental take of the Okaloosa darter are allowed, provided these activities are consistent with a Service-approved Okaloosa darter recovery plan, or otherwise approved by the Service, whether those activities occur on or off of Eglin AFB.

(4) Take caused by any activities not listed in paragraph (bb)(2) and (bb)(3) of this section is prohibited.

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §17.44, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§17.45   Special rules—snails and clams. [Reserved]

§17.46   Special rules—crustaceans.

(a) Madison Cave isopod (Antrolana lira). (1) All provisions of §17.31 (a) and (b) apply to this species except that it may be taken for scientific purposes without Federal permits issued pursuant to these regulations: Provided, that all other Federal, State, or local laws, regulations, ordinances or other restrictions or limitations have been complied with.

(b) [Reserved]

[47 FR 43701, Oct. 4, 1982]

§17.47   Special rules—insects.

(a) Cassius blue butterfly (Leptotes cassius theonus), Ceraunus blue butterfly (Hemiargus ceraunus antibubastus), and Nickerbean blue butterfly (Cyclargus ammon).

(1) The provisions of §17.31(c) apply to these species (cassius blue butterfly, ceraunus blue butterfly, nickerbean blue butterfly), regardless of whether in the wild or in captivity, and also apply to the progeny of any such butterfly.

(2) Any violation of State law will also be a violation of the Act.

(3) Incidental take, that is, take that results from, but is not the purpose of, carrying out an otherwise lawful activity, will not apply to the cassius blue butterfly, ceraunus blue butterfly, and nickerbean blue butterfly.

(4) Collection of the cassius blue butterfly, ceraunus blue butterfly, and nickerbean blue butterfly is prohibited in coastal counties south of Interstate 4 and extending to the boundaries of the State of Florida at the endpoints of Interstate 4 at Tampa and Daytona Beach. Specifically, such activities are prohibited in the following counties: Brevard, Broward, Charlotte, Collier, De Soto, Hillsborough, Indian River, Lee, Manatee, Pinellas, Sarasota, St. Lucie, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Palm Beach, and Volusia.

(b) [Reserved]

[77 FR 20986, Apr. 6, 2012]

§17.48   Special rules—common sponges and other forms. [Reserved]



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