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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of July 29, 2014

Title 49: Transportation
PART 192—TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS


Subpart A—General


Contents
§192.1   What is the scope of this part?
§192.3   Definitions.
§192.5   Class locations.
§192.7   What documents are incorporated by reference partly or wholly in this part?
§192.8   How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?
§192.9   What requirements apply to gathering lines?
§192.10   Outer continental shelf pipelines.
§192.11   Petroleum gas systems.
§192.13   What general requirements apply to pipelines regulated under this part?
§192.14   Conversion to service subject to this part.
§192.15   Rules of regulatory construction.
§192.16   Customer notification.

§192.1   What is the scope of this part?

(a) This part prescribes minimum safety requirements for pipeline facilities and the transportation of gas, including pipeline facilities and the transportation of gas within the limits of the outer continental shelf as that term is defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331).

(b) This part does not apply to—

(1) Offshore gathering of gas in State waters upstream from the outlet flange of each facility where hydrocarbons are produced or where produced hydrocarbons are first separated, dehydrated, or otherwise processed, whichever facility is farther downstream;

(2) Pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) that are producer-operated and cross into State waters without first connecting to a transporting operator's facility on the OCS, upstream (generally seaward) of the last valve on the last production facility on the OCS. Safety equipment protecting PHMSA-regulated pipeline segments is not excluded. Producing operators for those pipeline segments upstream of the last valve of the last production facility on the OCS may petition the Administrator, or designee, for approval to operate under PHMSA regulations governing pipeline design, construction, operation, and maintenance under 49 CFR 190.9;

(3) Pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf upstream of the point at which operating responsibility transfers from a producing operator to a transporting operator;

(4) Onshore gathering of gas—

(i) Through a pipeline that operates at less than 0 psig (0 kPa);

(ii) Through a pipeline that is not a regulated onshore gathering line (as determined in §192.8); and

(iii) Within inlets of the Gulf of Mexico, except for the requirements in §192.612; or

(5) Any pipeline system that transports only petroleum gas or petroleum gas/air mixtures to—

(i) Fewer than 10 customers, if no portion of the system is located in a public place; or

(ii) A single customer, if the system is located entirely on the customer's premises (no matter if a portion of the system is located in a public place).

[35 FR 13257, Aug. 19, 1970, as amended by Amdt. 192-27, 41 FR 34605, Aug. 16, 1976; Amdt. 192-67, 56 FR 63771, Dec. 5, 1991; Amdt. 192-78, 61 FR 28782, June 6, 1996; Amdt. 192-81, 62 FR 61695, Nov. 19, 1997; Amdt. 192-92, 68 FR 46112, Aug. 5, 2003; 70 FR 11139, Mar. 8, 2005; Amdt. 192-102, 71 FR 13301, Mar. 15, 2006; Amdt. 192-103, 72 FR 4656, Feb. 1, 2007]

§192.3   Definitions.

As used in this part:

Abandoned means permanently removed from service.

Active corrosion means continuing corrosion that, unless controlled, could result in a condition that is detrimental to public safety.

Administrator means the Administrator, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration or his or her delegate.

Alarm means an audible or visible means of indicating to the controller that equipment or processes are outside operator-defined, safety-related parameters.

Control room means an operations center staffed by personnel charged with the responsibility for remotely monitoring and controlling a pipeline facility.

Controller means a qualified individual who remotely monitors and controls the safety-related operations of a pipeline facility via a SCADA system from a control room, and who has operational authority and accountability for the remote operational functions of the pipeline facility.

Customer meter means the meter that measures the transfer of gas from an operator to a consumer.

Distribution line means a pipeline other than a gathering or transmission line.

Electrical survey means a series of closely spaced pipe-to-soil readings over pipelines which are subsequently analyzed to identify locations where a corrosive current is leaving the pipeline.

Exposed underwater pipeline means an underwater pipeline where the top of the pipe protrudes above the underwater natural bottom (as determined by recognized and generally accepted practices) in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep, as measured from mean low water.

Gas means natural gas, flammable gas, or gas which is toxic or corrosive.

Gathering line means a pipeline that transports gas from a current production facility to a transmission line or main.

Gulf of Mexico and its inlets means the waters from the mean high water mark of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets open to the sea (excluding rivers, tidal marshes, lakes, and canals) seaward to include the territorial sea and Outer Continental Shelf to a depth of 15 feet (4.6 meters), as measured from the mean low water.

Hazard to navigation means, for the purposes of this part, a pipeline where the top of the pipe is less than 12 inches (305 millimeters) below the underwater natural bottom (as determined by recognized and generally accepted practices) in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep, as measured from the mean low water.

High-pressure distribution system means a distribution system in which the gas pressure in the main is higher than the pressure provided to the customer.

Line section means a continuous run of transmission line between adjacent compressor stations, between a compressor station and storage facilities, between a compressor station and a block valve, or between adjacent block valves.

Listed specification means a specification listed in section I of appendix B of this part.

Low-pressure distribution system means a distribution system in which the gas pressure in the main is substantially the same as the pressure provided to the customer.

Main means a distribution line that serves as a common source of supply for more than one service line.

Maximum actual operating pressure means the maximum pressure that occurs during normal operations over a period of 1 year.

Maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) means the maximum pressure at which a pipeline or segment of a pipeline may be operated under this part.

Municipality means a city, county, or any other political subdivision of a State.

Offshore means beyond the line of ordinary low water along that portion of the coast of the United States that is in direct contact with the open seas and beyond the line marking the seaward limit of inland waters.

Operator means a person who engages in the transportation of gas.

Outer Continental Shelf means all submerged lands lying seaward and outside the area of lands beneath navigable waters as defined in Section 2 of the Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1301) and of which the subsoil and seabed appertain to the United States and are subject to its jurisdiction and control.

Person means any individual, firm, joint venture, partnership, corporation, association, State, municipality, cooperative association, or joint stock association, and including any trustee, receiver, assignee, or personal representative thereof.

Petroleum gas means propane, propylene, butane, (normal butane or isobutanes), and butylene (including isomers), or mixtures composed predominantly of these gases, having a vapor pressure not exceeding 208 psi (1434 kPa) gage at 100 °F (38 °C).

Pipe means any pipe or tubing used in the transportation of gas, including pipe-type holders.

Pipeline means all parts of those physical facilities through which gas moves in transportation, including pipe, valves, and other appurtenance attached to pipe, compressor units, metering stations, regulator stations, delivery stations, holders, and fabricated assemblies.

Pipeline environment includes soil resistivity (high or low), soil moisture (wet or dry), soil contaminants that may promote corrosive activity, and other known conditions that could affect the probability of active corrosion.

Pipeline facility means new and existing pipelines, rights-of-way, and any equipment, facility, or building used in the transportation of gas or in the treatment of gas during the course of transportation.

Service line means a distribution line that transports gas from a common source of supply to an individual customer, to two adjacent or adjoining residential or small commercial customers, or to multiple residential or small commercial customers served through a meter header or manifold. A service line ends at the outlet of the customer meter or at the connection to a customer's piping, whichever is further downstream, or at the connection to customer piping if there is no meter.

Service regulator means the device on a service line that controls the pressure of gas delivered from a higher pressure to the pressure provided to the customer. A service regulator may serve one customer or multiple customers through a meter header or manifold.

SMYS means specified minimum yield strength is:

(1) For steel pipe manufactured in accordance with a listed specification, the yield strength specified as a minimum in that specification; or

(2) For steel pipe manufactured in accordance with an unknown or unlisted specification, the yield strength determined in accordance with §192.107(b).

State means each of the several States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system means a computer-based system or systems used by a controller in a control room that collects and displays information about a pipeline facility and may have the ability to send commands back to the pipeline facility.

Transmission line means a pipeline, other than a gathering line, that: (1) Transports gas from a gathering line or storage facility to a distribution center, storage facility, or large volume customer that is not down-stream from a distribution center; (2) operates at a hoop stress of 20 percent or more of SMYS; or (3) transports gas within a storage field.

Note: A large volume customer may receive similar volumes of gas as a distribution center, and includes factories, power plants, and institutional users of gas.

Transportation of gas means the gathering, transmission, or distribution of gas by pipeline or the storage of gas, in or affecting interstate or foreign commerce.

[Amdt. 192-13, 38 FR 9084, Apr. 10, 1973, as amended by Amdt. 192-27, 41 FR 34605, Aug. 16, 1976; Amdt. 192-58, 53 FR 1635, Jan. 21, 1988; Amdt. 192-67, 56 FR 63771, Dec. 5, 1991; Amdt. 192-72, 59 FR 17281, Apr. 12, 1994; Amdt. 192-78, 61 FR 28783, June 6, 1996; Amdt. 192-81, 62 FR 61695, Nov. 19, 1997; Amdt. 192-85, 63 FR 37501, July 13, 1998; Amdt. 192-89, 65 FR 54443, Sept. 8, 2000; 68 FR 11749, Mar. 12, 2003; Amdt. 192-93, 68 FR 53900, Sept. 15, 2003; Amdt. 192-98, 69 FR 48406, Aug. 10, 2004; Amdt. 192-94, 69 FR 54592, Sept. 9, 2004; 70 FR 3148, Jan. 21, 2005; 70 FR 11139, Mar. 8, 2005; Amdt. 192-112, 74 FR 63326, Dec. 3, 2009; Amdt. 192-114, 75 FR 48601, Aug. 11, 2010]

§192.5   Class locations.

(a) This section classifies pipeline locations for purposes of this part. The following criteria apply to classifications under this section.

(1) A “class location unit” is an onshore area that extends 220 yards (200 meters) on either side of the centerline of any continuous 1- mile (1.6 kilometers) length of pipeline.

(2) Each separate dwelling unit in a multiple dwelling unit building is counted as a separate building intended for human occupancy.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, pipeline locations are classified as follows:

(1) A Class 1 location is:

(i) An offshore area; or

(ii) Any class location unit that has 10 or fewer buildings intended for human occupancy.

(2) A Class 2 location is any class location unit that has more than 10 but fewer than 46 buildings intended for human occupancy.

(3) A Class 3 location is:

(i) Any class location unit that has 46 or more buildings intended for human occupancy; or

(ii) An area where the pipeline lies within 100 yards (91 meters) of either a building or a small, well-defined outside area (such as a playground, recreation area, outdoor theater, or other place of public assembly) that is occupied by 20 or more persons on at least 5 days a week for 10 weeks in any 12-month period. (The days and weeks need not be consecutive.)

(4) A Class 4 location is any class location unit where buildings with four or more stories above ground are prevalent.

(c) The length of Class locations 2, 3, and 4 may be adjusted as follows:

(1) A Class 4 location ends 220 yards (200 meters) from the nearest building with four or more stories above ground.

(2) When a cluster of buildings intended for human occupancy requires a Class 2 or 3 location, the class location ends 220 yards (200 meters) from the nearest building in the cluster.

[Amdt. 192-78, 61 FR 28783, June 6, 1996; 61 FR 35139, July 5, 1996, as amended by Amdt. 192-85, 63 FR 37502, July 13, 1998]

§192.7   What documents are incorporated by reference partly or wholly in this part?

(a) Any documents or portions thereof incorporated by reference in this part are included in this part as though set out in full. When only a portion of a document is referenced, the remainder is not incorporated in this part.

(b) All incorporated materials are available for inspection in the Office of Pipeline Safety, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC, 20590-0001, 202-366-4595, or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030 or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. These materials have been approved for incorporation by reference by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. In addition, the incorporated materials are available from the respective organizations listed in paragraph (c) (1) of this section.

(c) The full titles of documents incorporated by reference, in whole or in part, are provided herein. The numbers in parentheses indicate applicable editions. For each incorporated document, citations of all affected sections are provided. Earlier editions of currently listed documents or editions of documents listed in previous editions of 49 CFR part 192 may be used for materials and components designed, manufactured, or installed in accordance with these earlier documents at the time they were listed. The user must refer to the appropriate previous edition of 49 CFR part 192 for a listing of the earlier listed editions or documents.

(1) Incorporated by reference (IBR).

List of Organizations and Addresses:

A. Pipeline Research Council International, Inc. (PRCI), c/o Technical Toolboxes, 3801 Kirby Drive, Suite 520, Houston, TX 77098.

B. American Petroleum Institute (API), 1220 L Street, NW., Washington, DC 20005.

C. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428.

D. ASME International (ASME), Three Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990.

E. Manufacturers Standardization Society of the Valve and Fittings Industry, Inc. (MSS), 127 Park Street, NE., Vienna, VA 22180.

F. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), 1 Batterymarch Park, P.O. Box 9101, Quincy, MA 02269-9101.

G. Plastics Pipe Institute, Inc. (PPI), 1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Suite 680, Washington, DC 20009.

H. NACE International (NACE), 1440 South Creek Drive, Houston, TX 77084.

I. Gas Technology Institute (GTI), 1700 South Mount Prospect Road, Des Plaines, IL 60018.

(2) Documents incorporated by reference.

Source and name of referenced material49 CFR reference
A. Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI):
(1) AGA Pipeline Research Committee, Project PR-3-805, “A Modified Criterion for Evaluating the Remaining Strength of Corroded Pipe,” (December 22, 1989). The RSTRENG program may be used for calculating remaining strength§§192.485(c);.192.933(a)(1); 192.933(d)(1)(i).
B. American Petroleum Institute (API):
(1) ANSI/API Specification 5L/ISO 3183 “Specification for Line Pipe” (44th edition, 2007), includes errata (January 2009) and addendum (February 2009)§§192.55(e); 192.112; 192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(2) API Recommended Practice 5L1 “Recommended Practice for Railroad Transportation of Line Pipe,” (6th Edition, July 2002)§192.65(a)(1).
(3) API Recommended Practice 5LW, “Transportation of Line Pipe on Barges and Marine Vessels” (2nd edition, December 1996, effective March 1, 1997)§192.65(b).
(4) ANSI/API Specification 6D, “Specification for Pipeline Valves” (23rd edition (April 2008, effective October 1, 2008) and errata 3 (includes 1 and 2, February 2009))§192.145(a).
(5) API Recommended Practice 80, “Guidelines for the Definition of Onshore Gas Gathering Lines,” (1st edition, April 2000)§§192.8(a); 192.8(a)(1); 192.8(a)(2); 192.8(a)(3); 192.8(a)(4).
(6) API Standard 1104, “Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities” (20th edition, October 2005, errata/addendum, (July 2007) and errata 2 (2008))§§192.225; 192.227(a); 192.229(c)(1); 192.241(c); Item II, Appendix B.
(7) API Recommended Practice 1162, “Public Awareness Programs for Pipeline Operators,” (1st edition, December 2003)§§192.616(a); 192.616(b); 192.616(c).
(8) API Recommended Practice 1165 “Recommended Practice 1165 “Recommended Practice for Pipeline SCADA Displays,” (API RP 1165) (First edition (January 2007))§192.631(c)(1).
C. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM):
(1) ASTM A53/A53M-07, “Standard Specification for Pipe, Steel, Black and Hot-Dipped, Zinc-Coated, Welded and Seamless” (September 1, 2007)§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(2) ASTM A106/A106M-08, “Standard Specification for Seamless Carbon Steel Pipe for High-Temperature Service” (July 15, 2008)§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(3) ASTM A333/A333M-05 (2005) “Standard Specification for Seamless and Welded Steel Pipe for Low-Temperature Service”§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(4) ASTM A372/A372M-03 (reapproved 2008), “Standard Specification for Carbon and Alloy Steel Forgings for Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels” (March 1, 2008)§192.177(b)(1).
(5) ASTM A381-96 (reapproved 2005), “Standard Specification for Metal-Arc Welded Steel Pipe for Use With High-Pressure Transmission Systems” (October 1, 2005)§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(6) ASTM A578/A578M-96 (re-approved 2001) “Standard Specification for Straight-Beam Ultrasonic Examination of Plain and Clad Steel Plates for Special Applications.”§§192.112(c)(2)(iii).
(7) ASTM A671-06, “Standard Specification for Electric-Fusion-Welded Steel Pipe for Atmospheric and Lower Temperatures” (May 1, 2006)§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(8) ASTM A672-08, “Standard Specification for Electric-Fusion-Welded Steel Pipe for High-Pressure Service at Moderate Temperatures” (May 1, 2008)§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(9) ASTM A691-98 (reapproved 2007), “Standard Specification for Carbon and Alloy Steel Pipe, Electric-Fusion-Welded for High-Pressure Service at High Temperatures” (November 1, 2007)§§192.113; Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(10) ASTM D638-03 “Standard Test Method for Tensile Properties of Plastics.”§§192.283(a)(3); 192.283(b)(1).
(11) ASTM D2513-87 “Standard Specification for Thermoplastic Gas Pressure Pipe, Tubing, and Fittings.”§192.63(a)(1).
(12) ASTM D2513-99 “Standard Specification for Thermoplastic Gas Pressure Pipe, Tubing, and Fittings.”§§192.123(e)(2); 192.191(b); 192.281(b)(2); 192.283(a)(1)(i); Item 1, Appendix B to Part 192.
(13) ASTM D2517-00 “Standard Specification for Reinforced Epoxy Resin Gas Pressure Pipe and Fittings.”§§192.191(a); 192.281(d)(1); 192.283(a)(1)(ii); Item I, Appendix B to Part 192.
(14) ASTM F1055-1998, “Standard Specification for Electrofusion Type Polyethylene Fittings for Outside Diameter Controller Polyethylene Pipe and Tubing.”§192.283(a)(1)(iii).
D. ASME International (ASME):
(1) ASME/ANSI B16.1-2005, “Gray Iron Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings: (Classes 25, 125, and 250)” (August 31, 2006)§192.147(c).
(2) ASME/ANSI B16.5-2003, “Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings.” (October 2004)§§192.147(a); 192.279.
(3) ASME/ANSI B31G-1991 (Reaffirmed, 2004), “Manual for Determining the Remaining Strength of Corroded Pipelines.”§§192.485(c); 192.933(a).
(4) ASME/ANSI B31.8-2007, “Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping Systems” (November 30, 2007)§192.619(a)(1)(i).
(5) ASME/ANSI B31.8S-2004, “Supplement to B31.8 on Managing System Integrity of Gas Pipelines.”§§192.903(c); 192.907(b); 192.911 Introductory text; 192.911(i); 192.911(k); 192.911(l); 192.911(m); 192.913(a) Introductory text; 192.913(b)(1); 192.917(a) Introductory text; 192.917(b); 192.917(c); 192.917(e)(1); 192.917(e)(4); 192.921(a)(1); 192.923(b)(1); 192.923(b)(2); 192.923(b)(3); 192.925(b) Introductory text; 192.925(b)(1); 192.925(b)(2); 192.925(b)(3); 192.925(b)(4); 192.927(b); 192.927(c)(1)(i); 192.929(b)(1); 192.929(b)(2); 192.933(a); 192.933(d)(1); 192.933(d)(1)(i); 192.935(a); 192.935(b)(1)(iv); 192.937(c)(1); 192.939(a)(1)(i); 192.939(a)(1)(ii); 192.939(a)(3); 192.945(a).
(6) 2007 ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section I, “Rules for Construction of Power Boilers 2007” (2007 edition, July 1, 2007)§192.153(b).
(7) 2007 ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1, “Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels 2” (2007 edition, July 1, 2007)§§192.153(a); 192.153(b); 192.153(d); 192.165(b)(3).
(8) 2007 ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 2, “Alternative Rules, Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels” (2007 edition, July 1, 2007)§§192.153(b); 192.165(b)(3).
(9) 2007 ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section IX, “Welding and Brazing Procedures, Welders, Brazers, and Welding and Brazing Operators” (2007 edition, July 1, 2007)§§192.227(a); Item II, Appendix B to Part 192.
E. Manufacturers Standardization Society of the Valve and Fittings Industry, Inc. (MSS):
(1) MSS SP-44-2006, Standard Practice, “Steel Pipeline Flanges” (2006 edition)§192.147(a).
(2) [Reserved]
F. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA):
(1) NFPA 30 (2008 edition, August 15, 2007), “Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code” (2008 edition; approved August 15, 2007)§192.735(b).
(2) NFPA 58 (2004), “Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code (LP-Gas Code).”§§192.11(a); 192.11(b); 192.11(c).
(3) NFPA 59 (2004), “Utility LP-Gas Plant Code.”§§192.11(a); 192.11(b); 192.11(c).
(4) NFPA 70 (2008), “National Electrical Code” (NEC 2008) (Approved August 15, 2007)§§192.163(e); 192.189(c).
G. Plastics Pipe Institute, Inc. (PPI):
(1) PPI TR-3/2008 HDB/HDS/PDB/SDB/MRS Policies (2008), “Policies and Procedures for Developing Hydrostatic Design Basis (HDB), Pressure Design Basis (PDB), Strength Design Basis (SDB), and Minimum Required Strength (MRS) Ratings for Thermoplastic Piping Materials or Pipe” (May 2008)§192.121.
H. NACE International (NACE):
(1) NACE Standard SP0502-2008, Standard Practice, “Pipeline External Corrosion Direct Assessment Methodology” (reaffirmed March 20, 2008)§§192.923(b)(1); 192.925(b) Introductory text; 192.925(b)(1); 192.925(b)(1)(ii); 192.925(b)(2) Introductory text; 192.925(b)(3) Introductory text; 192.925(b)(3)(ii); 192.925(b)(3)(iv); 192.925(b)(4) Introductory text; 192.925(b)(4)(ii); 192.931(d); 192.935(b)(1)(iv); 192.939(a)(2).
I. Gas Technology Institute (GTI):
(1) GRI 02/0057 (2002) “Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment of Gas Transmission Pipelines Methodology.”§192.927(c)(2).

[35 FR 13257, Aug. 19, 1970]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §192.7, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§192.8   How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

(a) An operator must use API RP 80 (incorporated by reference, see §192.7), to determine if an onshore pipeline (or part of a connected series of pipelines) is an onshore gathering line. The determination is subject to the limitations listed below. After making this determination, an operator must determine if the onshore gathering line is a regulated onshore gathering line under paragraph (b) of this section.

(1) The beginning of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1) of API RP 80, may not extend beyond the furthermost downstream point in a production operation as defined in section 2.3 of API RP 80. This furthermost downstream point does not include equipment that can be used in either production or transportation, such as separators or dehydrators, unless that equipment is involved in the processes of “production and preparation for transportation or delivery of hydrocarbon gas” within the meaning of “production operation.”

(2) The endpoint of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1)(A) of API RP 80, may not extend beyond the first downstream natural gas processing plant, unless the operator can demonstrate, using sound engineering principles, that gathering extends to a further downstream plant.

(3) If the endpoint of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1)(C) of API RP 80, is determined by the commingling of gas from separate production fields, the fields may not be more than 50 miles from each other, unless the Administrator finds a longer separation distance is justified in a particular case (see 49 CFR §190.9).

(4) The endpoint of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1)(D) of API RP 80, may not extend beyond the furthermost downstream compressor used to increase gathering line pressure for delivery to another pipeline.

(b) For purposes of §192.9, “regulated onshore gathering line” means:

(1) Each onshore gathering line (or segment of onshore gathering line) with a feature described in the second column that lies in an area described in the third column; and

(2) As applicable, additional lengths of line described in the fourth column to provide a safety buffer:

TypeFeatureAreaSafety buffer
A—Metallic and the MAOP produces a hoop stress of 20 percent or more of SMYS. If the stress level is unknown, an operator must determine the stress level according to the applicable provisions in subpart C of this partClass 2, 3, or 4 location (see §192.5)None.
   —Non-metallic and the MAOP is more than 125 psig (862 kPa)
B—Metallic and the MAOP produces a hoop stress of less than 20 percent of SMYS. If the stress level is unknown, an operator must determine the stress level according to the applicable provisions in subpart C of this part
—Non-metallic and the MAOP is 125 psig (862 kPa) or less
Area 1. Class 3 or 4 location
Area 2. An area within a Class 2 location the operator determines by using any of the following three methods:
(a) A Class 2 location.
(b) An area extending 150 feet (45.7 m) on each side of the centerline of any continuous 1 mile (1.6 km) of pipeline and including more than 10 but fewer than 46 dwellings
(c) An area extending 150 feet (45.7 m) on each side of the centerline of any continous 1000 feet (305 m) of pipeline and including 5 or more dwellings
If the gathering line is in Area 2(b) or 2(c), the additional lengths of line extend upstream and downstream from the area to a point where the line is at least 150 feet (45.7 m) from the nearest dwelling in the area. However, if a cluster of dwellings in Area 2 (b) or 2(c) qualifies a line as Type B, the Type B classification ends 150 feet (45.7 m) from the nearest dwelling in the cluster.

[Amdt. 192-102, 71 FR 13302, Mar. 15, 2006]

§192.9   What requirements apply to gathering lines?

(a) Requirements. An operator of a gathering line must follow the safety requirements of this part as prescribed by this section.

(b) Offshore lines. An operator of an offshore gathering line must comply with requirements of this part applicable to transmission lines, except the requirements in §192.150 and in subpart O of this part.

(c) Type A lines. An operator of a Type A regulated onshore gathering line must comply with the requirements of this part applicable to transmission lines, except the requirements in §192.150 and in subpart O of this part. However, an operator of a Type A regulated onshore gathering line in a Class 2 location may demonstrate compliance with subpart N by describing the processes it uses to determine the qualification of persons performing operations and maintenance tasks.

(d) Type B lines. An operator of a Type B regulated onshore gathering line must comply with the following requirements:

(1) If a line is new, replaced, relocated, or otherwise changed, the design, installation, construction, initial inspection, and initial testing must be in accordance with requirements of this part applicable to transmission lines;

(2) If the pipeline is metallic, control corrosion according to requirements of subpart I of this part applicable to transmission lines;

(3) Carry out a damage prevention program under §192.614;

(4) Establish a public education program under §192.616;

(5) Establish the MAOP of the line under §192.619; and

(6) Install and maintain line markers according to the requirements for transmission lines in §192.707.

(e) Compliance deadlines. An operator of a regulated onshore gathering line must comply with the following deadlines, as applicable.

(1) An operator of a new, replaced, relocated, or otherwise changed line must be in compliance with the applicable requirements of this section by the date the line goes into service, unless an exception in §192.13 applies.

(2) If a regulated onshore gathering line existing on April 14, 2006 was not previously subject to this part, an operator has until the date stated in the second column to comply with the applicable requirement for the line listed in the first column, unless the Administrator finds a later deadline is justified in a particular case:

RequirementCompliance deadline
Control corrosion according to Subpart I requirements for transmission linesApril 15, 2009.
Carry out a damage prevention program under §192.614October 15, 2007.
Establish MAOP under §192.619October 15, 2007.
Install and maintain line markers under §192.707April 15, 2008.
Establish a public education program under §192.616April 15, 2008.
Other provisions of this part as required by paragraph (c) of this section for Type A linesApril 15, 2009.

(3) If, after April 14, 2006, a change in class location or increase in dwelling density causes an onshore gathering line to be a regulated onshore gathering line, the operator has 1 year for Type B lines and 2 years for Type A lines after the line becomes a regulated onshore gathering line to comply with this section.

[Amdt. 192-102, 71 FR 13301, Mar. 15, 2006]

§192.10   Outer continental shelf pipelines.

Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific points at which operating responsibility transfers to a producing operator. For those instances in which the transfer points are not identifiable by a durable marking, each operator will have until September 15, 1998 to identify the transfer points. If it is not practicable to durably mark a transfer point and the transfer point is located above water, the operator must depict the transfer point on a schematic located near the transfer point. If a transfer point is located subsea, then the operator must identify the transfer point on a schematic which must be maintained at the nearest upstream facility and provided to PHMSA upon request. For those cases in which adjoining operators have not agreed on a transfer point by September 15, 1998 the Regional Director and the MMS Regional Supervisor will make a joint determination of the transfer point.

[Amdt. 192-81, 62 FR 61695, Nov. 19, 1997, as amended at 70 FR 11139, Mar. 8, 2005]

§192.11   Petroleum gas systems.

(a) Each plant that supplies petroleum gas by pipeline to a natural gas distribution system must meet the requirements of this part and ANSI/NFPA 58 and 59.

(b) Each pipeline system subject to this part that transports only petroleum gas or petroleum gas/air mixtures must meet the requirements of this part and of ANSI/NFPA 58 and 59.

(c) In the event of a conflict between this part and ANSI/NFPA 58 and 59, ANSI/NFPA 58 and 59 prevail.

[Amdt. 192-78, 61 FR 28783, June 6, 1996]

§192.13   What general requirements apply to pipelines regulated under this part?

(a) No person may operate a segment of pipeline listed in the first column that is readied for service after the date in the second column, unless:

(1) The pipeline has been designed, installed, constructed, initially inspected, and initially tested in accordance with this part; or

(2) The pipeline qualifies for use under this part according to the requirements in §192.14.

Pipeline Date
Offshore gathering lineJuly 31, 1977.
Regulated onshore gathering line to which this part did not apply until April 14, 2006March 15 2007.
All other pipelinesMarch 12, 1971.

(b) No person may operate a segment of pipeline listed in the first column that is replaced, relocated, or otherwise changed after the date in the second column, unless the replacement, relocation or change has been made according to the requirements in this part.

Pipeline Date
Offshore gathering lineJuly 31, 1977.
Regulated onshore gathering line to which this part did not apply until April 14, 2006March 15, 2007.
All other pipelinesNovember 12, 1970.

(c) Each operator shall maintain, modify as appropriate, and follow the plans, procedures, and programs that it is required to establish under this part.

[35 FR 13257, Aug. 19, 1970, as amended by Amdt. 192-27, 41 FR 34605, Aug. 16, 1976; Amdt. 192-30, 42 FR 60148, Nov. 25, 1977; Amdt. 192-102, 71 FR 13303, Mar. 15, 2006]

§192.14   Conversion to service subject to this part.

(a) A steel pipeline previously used in service not subject to this part qualifies for use under this part if the operator prepares and follows a written procedure to carry out the following requirements:

(1) The design, construction, operation, and maintenance history of the pipeline must be reviewed and, where sufficient historical records are not available, appropriate tests must be performed to determine if the pipeline is in a satisfactory condition for safe operation.

(2) The pipeline right-of-way, all aboveground segments of the pipeline, and appropriately selected underground segments must be visually inspected for physical defects and operating conditions which reasonably could be expected to impair the strength or tightness of the pipeline.

(3) All known unsafe defects and conditions must be corrected in accordance with this part.

(4) The pipeline must be tested in accordance with subpart J of this part to substantiate the maximum allowable operating pressure permitted by subpart L of this part.

(b) Each operator must keep for the life of the pipeline a record of the investigations, tests, repairs, replacements, and alterations made under the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section.

[Amdt. 192-30, 42 FR 60148, Nov. 25, 1977]

§192.15   Rules of regulatory construction.

(a) As used in this part:

Includes means including but not limited to.

May means “is permitted to” or “is authorized to”.

May not means “is not permitted to” or “is not authorized to”.

Shall is used in the mandatory and imperative sense.

(b) In this part:

(1) Words importing the singular include the plural;

(2) Words importing the plural include the singular; and

(3) Words importing the masculine gender include the feminine.

§192.16   Customer notification.

(a) This section applies to each operator of a service line who does not maintain the customer's buried piping up to entry of the first building downstream, or, if the customer's buried piping does not enter a building, up to the principal gas utilization equipment or the first fence (or wall) that surrounds that equipment. For the purpose of this section, “customer's buried piping” does not include branch lines that serve yard lanterns, pool heaters, or other types of secondary equipment. Also, “maintain” means monitor for corrosion according to §192.465 if the customer's buried piping is metallic, survey for leaks according to §192.723, and if an unsafe condition is found, shut off the flow of gas, advise the customer of the need to repair the unsafe condition, or repair the unsafe condition.

(b) Each operator shall notify each customer once in writing of the following information:

(1) The operator does not maintain the customer's buried piping.

(2) If the customer's buried piping is not maintained, it may be subject to the potential hazards of corrosion and leakage.

(3) Buried gas piping should be—

(i) Periodically inspected for leaks;

(ii) Periodically inspected for corrosion if the piping is metallic; and

(iii) Repaired if any unsafe condition is discovered.

(4) When excavating near buried gas piping, the piping should be located in advance, and the excavation done by hand.

(5) The operator (if applicable), plumbing contractors, and heating contractors can assist in locating, inspecting, and repairing the customer's buried piping.

(c) Each operator shall notify each customer not later than August 14, 1996, or 90 days after the customer first receives gas at a particular location, whichever is later. However, operators of master meter systems may continuously post a general notice in a prominent location frequented by customers.

(d) Each operator must make the following records available for inspection by the Administrator or a State agency participating under 49 U.S.C. 60105 or 60106:

(1) A copy of the notice currently in use; and

(2) Evidence that notices have been sent to customers within the previous 3 years.

[Amdt. 192-74, 60 FR 41828, Aug. 14, 1995, as amended by Amdt. 192-74A, 60 FR 63451, Dec. 11, 1995; Amdt. 192-83, 63 FR 7723, Feb. 17, 1998]



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