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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 49: Transportation
PART 176—CARRIAGE BY VESSEL


Subpart C—General Handling and Stowage


Contents
§176.57   Supervision of handling and stowage.
§176.58   Preparation of the vessel.
§176.60   “No Smoking” signs.
§176.63   Stowage locations.
§176.65   Alternative stowage procedures.
§176.69   General stowage requirements for hazardous materials.
§176.70   Stowage requirements for marine pollutants.
§176.72   Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.
§176.74   On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.
§176.76   Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.
§176.77   Stowage of barges containing hazardous materials on board barge-carrying vessels.
§176.78   Use of power-operated industrial trucks on board vessels.

§176.57   Supervision of handling and stowage.

(a) Hazardous materials may be handled or stowed on board a vessel only under the direction and observation of a responsible person assigned this duty.

(b) For a vessel engaged in coastwise voyages, or on rivers, bays, sounds or lakes, including the Great Lakes when the voyage is not foreign-going, the responsible person may be an employee of the carrier and assigned this duty by the carrier, or a licensed officer attached to the vessel and assigned by the master of the vessel.

(c) For a domestic vessel engaged in a foreign-going or intercoastal voyage, the responsible person must be an officer possessing an unexpired license issued by the USCG and assigned this duty by the master of the vessel.

(d) For a foreign vessel, the responsible person must be an officer of the vessel assigned this duty by the master of the vessel.

[Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990]

§176.58   Preparation of the vessel.

(a) Each hold or compartment in which hazardous materials are to be stowed must be free of all debris before the hazardous materials are stowed. Bilges must be examined and all residue of previous cargo removed.

(b) All decks, gangways, hatches, and cargo ports over or through which hazardous materials must be passed or handled in loading or unloading must be free of all loose materials before cargo handling operations begin.

(c) No debris that creates a fire hazard or a hazardous condition for persons engaged in handling hazardous materials may be on the weather deck of a vessel during loading or unloading operations.

(d) Hatch beams and hatch covers may not be stowed in a location that would interfere with cargo handling.

[Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990]

§176.60   “No Smoking” signs.

When smoking is prohibited during the loading, stowing, storing, transportation, or unloading of hazardous materials by this part, the carrier and the master of the vessel are jointly responsible for posting “NO SMOKING” signs in conspicuous locations.

§176.63   Stowage locations.

(a) The table in §172.101 of this subchapter specifies generally the locations authorized for stowage of the various hazardous materials on board vessels. This part prescribes additional requirements with respect to the stowage of specific hazardous materials in addition to those authorized in §172.101 of this subchapter. This section sets forth the basic physical requirements for the authorized locations. Hazardous materials offered for transport as limited quantities are allocated stowage category A and are not subject to any of the specific stowage requirements indicated in column 10B in §172.101 of this subchapter for the material being transported.

(b) To qualify as “on deck” stowage, the location must be on the weather deck. If the location is in a house on the weather deck, the location must have a permanent structural opening to the atmosphere, such as a door, hatch, companionway or manhole, and must be vented to the atmosphere. The location may not have any structural opening to any living quarters, cargo, or other compartment unless the opening has means for being closed off and secured. Any deck house containing living quarters, a steering engine, a refrigerating unit, a refrigerated stowage box, or a heating unit may not be used unless that area is isolated from the cargo stowage area by a permanent, and tight, metallic bulkhead. Stowage in a shelter or 'tween deck is not considered to be “on deck”. A barge that is vented to the atmosphere and is stowed on deck on a barge-carrying ship is considered to be “on deck”. When an entry in §172.101 of this subchapter requires “on-deck” stowage and is qualified by the requirement “protected from sources of heat”, the stowage must be protected from the direct rays of the sun by means of structural erections or awnings except that such protection is not required for shipment in portable tanks.

(c) To qualify as “under deck” stowage, the location must be in a hold or compartment below the weather deck capable of being ventilated and allotted entirely to the carriage of cargo. It must be bounded by permanent steel decks and bulkheads or the shell of the vessel. The deck openings must have means for effectively closing the hold or compartment against the weather, and in the case of superimposed holds, for effectively closing off each hold. A hold or compartment containing a crew passage formed by battens or by mesh or wire screen bulkhead may not be used for the stowage of any hazardous material unless a watchman is provided for this area.

(d) To qualify as “under deck away from heat”, the location must be under deck and have built-in means for ventilation. If it is subject to heat from any artificial source, it only qualifies for the stowage of those hazardous materials for which “under deck” stowage is authorized.

(e) Notwithstanding the stowage provisions given in the table in §172.101 of this subchapter, empty packages containing residue, including IBCs and large packages, may be stowed “on deck” or “under deck” in a mechanically ventilated cargo space. However, empty pressure receptacles containing residue that carry a label of class 2.3 must be stowed “on deck” and waste aerosols must be stowed in accordance with the table in §172.101 of this subchapter.

(f) Stowage of containers on board hatchless container ships. (1) Containers holding a hazardous material may be stowed in or vertically above a hatchless container hold if the following conditions are met:

(1) All hazardous materials are permitted for under deck stowage as specified in the Table in §172.101 of this subchapter; and

(2) The hatchless container hold is in full compliance with the provisions of SOLAS, Chapter II-2/Regulation 19 (IBR; see §171.7 of this subchapter), applicable to enclosed container cargo spaces, as appropriate for the cargo transported.

[Amdt. 176-1, 41 FR 16110, Apr. 15, 1976, as amended by Amdt. 176-1A, 41 FR 40687, Sept. 20, 1976; Amdt. 176-1B, 41 FR 57072, Dec. 30, 1976; Amdt. 176-12, 45 FR 81572, Dec. 11, 1980; 66 FR 33438, June 21, 2001; 66 FR 45184, Aug. 28, 2001; 68 FR 45038, July 31, 2003; 69 FR 76180, Dec. 20, 2004; 76 FR 3384, Jan. 19, 2011; 78 FR 1094, Jan. 7, 2013]

§176.65   Alternative stowage procedures.

When a hazardous material is to be loaded on board a vessel and it is shown to the satisfaction of the Coast Guard Captain of the Port for the place where the vessel is being loaded that it is impracticable to comply with a stowage location requirement specified in the §172.101 table of this subchapter or a segregation, handling or stowage requirement specified in this part, the Captain of the Port may authorize in writing the use of an alternative stowage location or method of segregation, handling or stowage subject to such conditions as he finds will insure a level of safety at least equal to that afforded by the regulatory requirement concerned.

[Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990]

§176.69   General stowage requirements for hazardous materials.

(a) Hazardous materials (except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section and Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous) materials) must be stowed in a manner that will facilitate inspection during the voyage, their removal from a potentially dangerous situation, and the removal of packages in case of fire.

(b) Each package marked in accordance with §172.312(a)(2) of this subchapter must be stowed as to remain in the position indicated during transportation.

(c) If a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in freight containers or a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in barges is equipped with a fixed fire extinguishing and fire detection system, the freight containers or barges need not be stowed in the manner required by paragraph (a) of this section. When freight containers or barges containing hazardous materials are stowed on deck, they need not be stowed in the manner required by paragraph (a) of this section if fire fighting equipment capable of reaching and piercing the freight container or barge is on board the vessel.

(d) Packages of hazardous materials must be secured and dunnaged to prevent shifting in any direction. Vertical restraints are not required if the shape of the package and the stuffing pattern preclude shifting of the load.

(e) Packages of hazardous materials must be braced and dunnaged so that they are not likely to be pierced by the dunnage or crushed by a superimposed load.

[Amdt. 176-1, 41 FR 16110, Apr. 15, 1976, as amended by Amdt. 176-1A, 41 FR 40687, Sept. 20, 1976; Amdt. 176-12, 45 FR 81573, Dec. 11, 1980; Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990; 56 FR 66282, Dec. 20, 1991; 68 FR 61942, Oct. 30, 2003]

§176.70   Stowage requirements for marine pollutants.

(a) Marine pollutants must be properly stowed and secured to minimize the hazards to the marine environment without impairing the safety of the ship and the persons on board.

(b) Where stowage is permitted “on deck or under deck”, under deck stowage is preferred except when a weather deck provides equivalent protection.

(c) Where stowage “on deck only” is required, preference should be given to stowage on well-protected decks or to stowage inboard in sheltered areas of exposed decks.

[Amdt. 176-31, 57 FR 52940, Nov. 5, 1992]

§176.72   Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

(a) A metal bale hook may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials.

(b) The use of equipment designed to lift or move cargo by means of pressure exerted on the packages may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials if the device can damage the package or the package is not designed to be moved in that manner.

(c) Pallets, slings, cargo nets and other related equipment used in loading packages of hazardous materials must give adequate support to the packages. The packages must be contained so that they are not able to fall during loading.

§176.74   On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.

(a) Packages containing hazardous materials must be secured by enclosing in boxes, cribs or cradles and proper lashing by use of wire rope, strapping or other means, including shoring and bracing, or both. Lashing of deck cargo is permitted if eye pads are used to attach the lashings. Lashings may not be secured to guard rails. Bulky articles must be shored.

(b) A packaging susceptible to weather or water damage must be protected so that it will not be exposed to the weather or to sea water.

(c) Not more than fifty percent of the total open deck area should be used for stowage of hazardous materials (except Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous material).

(d) Fireplugs, hoses, sounding pipes, and access to these must be free and clear of all cargo.

(e) Crew and passenger spaces and areas set aside for the crew's use may not be used to stow any hazardous material.

(f) A hazardous material may not be stowed within a horizontal distance of 25 feet of an operating or embarkation point of a lifeboat.

(g) Hazardous materials must be stowed to permit safe access to the crew's quarters and to all parts of the deck required in navigation and necessary working of the vessel.

(h) When runways for use of the crew are built over stowed hazardous materials, they must be constructed and fitted with rails and lifelines so as to afford complete protection to the crew when in use.

[Amdt. 176-1, 41 FR 16110, Apr. 15, 1976, as amended by Amdt. 176-1B, 41 FR 57072, Dec. 30, 1976; Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990; 56 FR 66282, Dec. 20, 1991; 66 FR 45181, Aug. 28, 2001]

§176.76   Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (f) of this section, hazardous materials authorized to be transported by vessel may be carried on board a vessel in a transport vehicle or freight container, subject to the following conditions (see additional requirements concerning the transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in §§176.168 through 176.172 of this subchapter):

(1) The material must be in proper condition for transportation according to the requirements of this subchapter;

(2) All packages in the transport vehicle or freight container must be secured to prevent shifting in any direction. Vertical restraint is not required if the shape of the packages, loading pattern, and horizontal restraint preclude vertical shifting of the load within the freight container or transport vehicle;

(3) Bulkheads made of dunnage which extend to the level of the cargo must be provided unless the packages are stowed flush with the sides or ends;

(4) Dunnage must be secured to the floor when the cargo consists of dense materials or heavy packages;

(5) Each package marked in accordance with §172.312(a)(2) of this subchapter must be stowed as marked;

(6) Any slack spaces between packages must be filled with dunnage;

(7) The weight in a container must be distributed throughout as evenly as possible and the maximum permissible weight must not be exceeded;

(8) Adjacent levels of baggaged and baled cargo must be stowed in alternate directions so that each tier binds the tier above and below it;

(9) When security devices, beacons or other tracking or monitoring equipment are used, they must be securely installed and must be of a certified safe type for the hazardous materials that will be carried within the freight container or transport vehicle in which such as device or equipment is installed.

(10) The lading must be contained entirely within the freight container or vehicle body without overhang or projection except that oversized machinery such as tractors or vehicles with batteries attached may overhang or project outside the intermodal container provided all of that portion of the lading that consists of hazardous materials is contained entirely within the freight container. No open-bed container or vehicle is permitted to carry hazardous materials unless it is equipped with a means of properly securing the lading.

(11) When packages are secured with banding or straps, these restraints must not be over-tightened to cause damage or deformation of the packages or the securing points (such as D-rings) within the freight container or transport vehicle.

(b) A transport vehicle containing hazardous materials may be carried only on board a trailership, trainship, ferry vessel or car float.

(c) [Reserved]

(d) A transport vehicle or freight container equipped with heating or refrigeration equipment may be operated on board a vessel. However, the equipment may not be operated in any hold or compartment in which any flammable liquid or gas is stowed. Any heating or air conditioning equipment having a fuel tank containing a flammable liquid or gas may be stowed only “on deck”. Equipment electrically powered and designed to operate within an environment containing flammable vapors may be operated below deck in a hold or compartment containing a flammable liquid or gas.

(e) A transport vehicle, loaded with any hazardous material which is required to be stowed “on deck” by §172.101 of this subchapter, may be stowed one deck below the weather deck when transported on a trainship or trailership which is unable to provide “on deck” stowage because of the vessel's design. Otherwise, the transport vehicle or container must be transported “on deck.”

(f) A hazardous material may be carried on board a vessel in a portable tank subject to the following conditions:

(1) Small passenger vessels of 100 gross tons, or less, may carry a hazardous material in a portable tank only when 16 or less passengers are on board and only when specifically authorized by the Officer-in-Charge, Marine Inspection, by endorsement of the vessel's Certificate of Inspection.

(2) Portable tanks containing flammable liquids or gases, combustible liquids with flashpoints below 60 °C (140 °F). that are insoluble in water, or organic peroxides, spontaneously combustible materials, or water reactive materials must be stowed on deck irrespective of the stowage authorized in §172.101 of this subchapter. Portable tanks containing hazardous materials not restricted to on deck stowage by the previous sentence must be stowed in accordance with the requirements specified in §172.101 of this subchapter.

(3) Aluminum, magnesium, and their alloys are specifically prohibited as materials of construction of portable tanks.

(g) Cryogenic liquids. For shipment of cryogenic liquids on board a vessel the packaging must be designed and filled so that:

(1) Any cryogenic liquid being transported in a cargo tank, regardless of the pressure in the package, must be contained in a steel jacketed Specification MC-338 (§178.338 of this subchapter) insulated cargo tank.

(2) Any valve or fitting with moving or abrading parts that may come in contact with any cryogenic liquid may not be made of aluminum.

(3) For a flammable cryogenic liquid being transported in a cargo tank, the elapsed time between the loading of the cargo tank and the subsequent unloading of the cargo tank at its final destination may not exceed the marked rated holding time (MRHT) of the cargo tank for the cryogenic liquid being transported, which must be displayed on or adjacent to the specification plate.

(4) Portable tanks, cargo tanks, and tank cars containing cryogenic liquids must be stowed “on deck” regardless of the stowage authorized in §172.101 of this subchapter. Cargo tanks or tank cars containing cryogenic liquids may be stowed one deck below the weather deck when transported on a trailership or trainship that is unable to provide “on deck” stowage because of the vessel's design. Tank cars must be Class DOT-113 or AAR-204W tank cars.

(h) A fumigated cargo transport unit may only be transported on board a vessel subject to the following conditions and limitations:

(1) The fumigated cargo transport unit may be placed on board a vessel only if at least 24 hours have elapsed since the unit was last fumigated;

(2) The fumigated cargo transport unit is accompanied by a document showing the date of fumigation and the type and amount of fumigant used;

(3) Prior to loading, the master is informed of the intended placement of the fumigated cargo transport unit on board the vessel and the information provided on the accompanying document;

(4) Equipment that is capable of detecting the fumigant and instructions for the equipment's use is provided on the vessel;

(5) The fumigated cargo transport unit must be stowed at least 5 m from any opening to accommodation spaces;

(6) Fumigated cargo transport units may only be transported on deck on vessels carrying more than 25 passengers; and

(7) Fumigants may not be added to cargo transport units while on board a vessel.

(i) A cargo transport unit packed or loaded with flammable gas or flammable liquid having a flashpoint below +23 °C transported on deck must be stowed “away from” possible sources of ignition. In the case of container ships, a distance equivalent to one container space athwartships away from possible sources of ignition applied in any direction will satisfy this requirement.

[Amdt. 176-1, 41 FR 16110, Apr. 15, 1976]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §176.76, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§176.77   Stowage of barges containing hazardous materials on board barge-carrying vessels.

(a) A barge which contains hazardous materials may be transported on board a barge-carrying vessel if it is stowed in accordance with the requirements of this section.

(b) A barge which contains hazardous materials for which only “on deck” stowage is authorized must be stowed above the weather deck and be vented to the atmosphere.

(c) A barge which contains hazardous materials for which both “on deck” and “below deck” stowage is authorized may be stowed above or below the weather deck.

[ Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990 as amended at 76 FR 56317, Sept. 13, 2011]

§176.78   Use of power-operated industrial trucks on board vessels.

(a) Power Operated trucks. A power-operated truck (including a power-operated tractor, forklift, or other specialized truck used for cargo handling) may not be used on board a vessel in a space containing a hazardous material unless the truck conforms to the requirements of this section. The COTP may suspend or prohibit the use of cargo handling vehicles or equipment when that use constitutes a safety hazard.

(b) Each truck must have a specific designation of Underwriter's Laboratories or Factory Mutual Laboratories. Any repair or alteration to a truck must be equivalent to that required on the original designation.

(c) Description of designations. The recognized testing laboratory type designations are as follows:

(1) An “E” designated unit is an electrically-powered unit that has minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards.

(2) An “EE” designated unit is an electrically-powered unit that has, in addition to all the requirements for the “E” unit, the electric motor and all other electrical equipment completely enclosed.

(3) An “EX” designated unit is an electrically-powered unit that differs from the “E” and “EE” unit in that the electrical fittings and equipment are so designed, constructed, and assembled that the unit may be used in certain atmospheres containing flammable vapors or dusts.

(4) A “G” designated unit is a gasoline-powered unit having minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards.

(5) A “GS” designated unit is a gasoline-powered unit that is provided with additional safeguards to the exhaust, fuel, and electrical systems.

(6) An “LP” designated unit is similar to a “G” unit except that it is powered by liquefied petroleum gas instead of gasoline.

(7) An “LPS” designated unit is a unit similar to a “GS” unit except that liquefied petroleum gas is used for fuel instead of gasoline.

(8) A “D” designated unit is a unit similar to a “G” unit except that it is powered by a diesel engine instead of a gasoline engine.

(9) A “DS” designated unit is a unit powered by a diesel engine provided with additional safeguards to the exhaust, fuel, and electrical systems.

(d) Class 1 (explosive) materials. No power-operated truck may be used to handle Class 1 (explosive) materials or other cargo in an area near Class 1 (explosive) materials on board a vessel except:

(1) A power-operated truck designated EE or EX.

(2) A power-operated truck designated LPS, GS, D, or DS may be used under conditions acceptable to the COTP.

(e) Other hazardous materials. (1) Only an “EX”, “EE”, “GS”, “LPA”, or “DS” truck may be used in a hold or compartment containing Division 2.1 (flammable gas) materials, Class 3 (flammable liquids), Class 4 (flammable solids) materials, or Class 5 (oxidizers or organic peroxides) materials, cottons or other vegetable fibers, or bulk sulfur.

(2) Only a designated truck may be used to handle any other hazardous material not covered in paragraph (d) or (e)(1) of this section.

(f) Minimum safety features. In addition to the construction and design safety features required, each truck must have at least the following minimum safety features:

(1) The truck must be equipped with a warning horn, whistle, gong, or other device that may be heard clearly above normal shipboard noises.

(2) When the truck operation may expose the operator to danger from a falling object, the truck must be equipped with a driver's overhead guard. When the overall height of the truck with forks in the lowered position is limited by head room the overhead guard may be omitted. This overhead guard is only intended to offer protection from impact of small packages, boxes, bagged material, or similar hazards.

(3) A forklift truck used to handle small objects or unstable loads must be equipped with a load backrest extension having height, width, and strength sufficient to prevent any load, or part of it, from falling toward the mast when the mast is in a position of maximum backward tilt. The load backrest extension must be constructed in a manner that does not interfere with good visibility.

(4) The forks on a fork lift truck must be secured to the carriage so as to prevent any unintentional lifting of the toe which could create a hazard. The forks may not display permanent deformation when subjected to a test load of three times the rated capacity.

(5) Each fork extension or other attachment must be secured to prevent unintentional lifting or displacement on primary forks.

(6) Tires extending beyond the confines of the truck shall be provided with a guard to prevent the tires from throwing particles at the operator.

(7) Unless the steering mechanism is a type that prevents road reactions from causing the steering handwheel to spin, a mushroom type steering knob must be used to engage the palm of the operator's hand, or the steering mechanism must be arranged in some other manner to prevent injury. The knob must be mounted within the perimeter of the wheel.

(8) All steering controls must be confined within the clearnace of the truck or guarded so that moving of the controls will not result in injury to the operator when passing stanchions, obstructions or other.

(g) Special operating conditions. (1) A truck may not be used on board a vessel unless prior notification of its use is given to the master or senior deck officer on board.

(2) Before a truck is operated on board a vessel, it must be in a safe operating condition as determined by the master or senior deck officer on board.

(3) Any truck that emits sparks or flames from the exhaust system must immediately be removed from service and may not be returned to service until the cause of these sparks or flames has been eliminated.

(4)-(5) [Reserved]

(6) All truck motors must be shut off immediately when a breakage or leakage of packages containing flammable liquids or gases, flammable solids, oxidizers, or organic peroxides occurs or is discovered.

(7) The rated capacity of the truck must be posted on the truck at all times in a conspicuous place. This capacity may not be exceeded.

(8) At least one Coast Guard approved marine type size 1 Type B, or UL approved 5BC portable fire extinguisher, or its approved equivalent, must be affixed to the truck in a readily accessible position or must be kept in close proximity, available for immediate use.

(9) The vessel's fire fighting equipment, both fixed (where installed) and portable, must be kept ready for immediate use in the vicinity of the space being worked.

(h) Refueling. (1) A truck using gasoline as fuel may not be refueled in the hold or on the weather deck of a vessel unless a portable non-spilling fuel handling system of not over five gallons capacity is used. Gasoline may not be transferred to a portable non-spilling fuel handling device on board the vessel.

(2) A truck using liquefied petroleum gas as fuel may not be refueled in the hold or on the weather deck of a vessel unless it is fitted with a removable tank and the hand-operated shutoff valve of the depleted tank is closed. In addition, the motor must be run until it stalls from lack of fuel and then the hand-operated shut off valve closed before the quick disconnect fitting to the fuel tank is disconnected.

(3) A truck using diesel oil as fuel may not be refueled on the weather deck or in the hold of a vessel unless a portable container of not over a five gallon capacity is used. A truck may be refueled or a portable container may be refilled from a larger container of diesel fuel on the weather deck of a vessel if a suitable pump is used for the transfer operation and a drip pan of adequate size is used to prevent any dripping of fuel on the deck.

(4) Refueling must be performed under the direct supervision of an experienced and responsible person specifically designated for this duty by the person in charge of the loading or unloading of the vessel.

(5) Refueling may not be undertaken with less than two persons specifically assigned and present for the complete operation, at least one of whom must be experienced in using the portable fire extinguishers required in the fuel area.

(6) At least one Coast Guard approved marine type size 1 Type B or UL approved 5BC portable fire extinguisher or its approved equivalent, must be provided in the fueling area. This is in addition to the extinguisher required by paragraph (g)(8) of this section.

(7) The location for refueling trucks must be designated by the master or senior deck officer on board the vessel. “NO SMOKING” signs must be conspicuously posted in the area.

(8) The location designated for refueling must be adequately ventilated to insure against accumulation of any hazardous concentration of vapors.

(9) Before any truck in a hold is refueled or before any fuel handling device or unmounted liquefied petroleum gas cylinder is placed in a hold, the motors of all trucks in the same hold must be stopped.

(10) All fuel handling devices and unmounted liquefied petroleum gas containers must be removed from a hold before any truck motor is started and the trucks are placed in operation in that hold.

(i) Replacing batteries. Batteries for electrically powered trucks and for the ignition systems of internal combustion powered trucks may be changed in the hold of a vessel subject to the following conditions:

(1) Only suitable handling equipment may be employed.

(2) Adequate precautions must be taken to avoid damage to the battery, short circuiting of the battery, and spillage of the electrolyte.

(j) Charging of batteries. Batteries of industrial trucks may be recharged in a hold of a vessel subject to the following conditions:

(1) The batteries must be housed in a suitable, ventilated, portable metal container with a suitable outlet at the top for connection of a portable air hose, or must be placed directly beneath a suitable outlet at the top for connection of a portable air hose. The air hose must be permanently connected to an exhaust duct leading to the open deck and terminate in a gooseneck or other suitable weather head. If natural ventilation is not practicable or adequate, mechanical means of exhaust must be employed in conjunction with the duct. The air outlet on the battery container must be equipped with an interlock switch so arranged that the charging of the battery cannot take place unless the air hose is properly connected to the box.

(2) If mechanical ventilation is used, an additional interlock must be provided between the fan and the charging circuit so that the fan must be in operation in order to complete the charging circuit for operation. It is preferable that this interlock switch be of a centrifugal type driven by the fan shaft.

(3) The hold may not contain any hazardous materials.

(4) The charging facilities may be part of the truck equipment or may be separate from the truck and located inside or outside the cargo hold. The power supply or charging circuit (whichever method is used) must be connected to the truck by a portable plug connection of the break-away type. This portable plug must be so engaged with the truck battery charging outlet that any movement of the truck away from the charging station will break the connection between the plug and receptacle without exposing any live parts to contact with a conducting surface or object and without the plug falling to the deck where it may become subject to damage.

(5) All unmounted batteries must be suitably protected or removed from an area in the hold of the vessel before any truck is operated in that area.

(k) Stowage of power-operated industrial trucks on board a vessel. Trucks stowed on board a vessel must meet vessel stowage requirements in §176.905.

(l) Packaging and stowage of fuel on board a vessel. Division 2.1 (flammable gas) materials and flammable liquids used as fuel for industrial trucks must be packaged and stowed as authorized in 46 CFR 147.60 or 46 CFR 147.45, respectively.

[Amdt. 176-1, 41 FR 16110, Apr. 15, 1976, as amended by Amdt. 176-1A, 41 FR 40687, Sept. 20, 1976; Amdt. 176-30, 55 FR 52689, Dec. 21, 1990; Amdt. 176-39, 61 FR 18933, Apr. 29, 1996; Amdt. 176-43, 62 FR 24741, May 6, 1997; 65 FR 58630, Sept. 29, 2000; 68 FR 61942, Oct. 30, 2003]



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