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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 17, 2014

Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 141—NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS


Subpart O—Consumer Confidence Reports


Contents
§141.151   Purpose and applicability of this subpart.
§141.152   Effective dates.
§141.153   Content of the reports.
§141.154   Required additional health information.
§141.155   Report delivery and recordkeeping.
Appendix A to Subpart O of Part 141—Regulated Contaminants

Source: 63 FR 44526, Aug. 19, 1998, unless otherwise noted.

§141.151   Purpose and applicability of this subpart.

(a) This subpart establishes the minimum requirements for the content of annual reports that community water systems must deliver to their customers. These reports must contain information on the quality of the water delivered by the systems and characterize the risks (if any) from exposure to contaminants detected in the drinking water in an accurate and understandable manner.

(b) Notwithstanding the provisions of §141.3, this subpart applies only to community water systems.

(c) For the purpose of this subpart, customers are defined as billing units or service connections to which water is delivered by a community water system.

(d) For the purpose of this subpart, detected means: at or above the levels prescribed by §141.23(a)(4) for inorganic contaminants, at or above the levels prescribed by §141.24(f)(7) for the contaminants listed in §141.61(a), at or above the levels prescribed by §141.24(h)(18) for the contaminants listed in §141.61(c), at or above the levels prescribed by §141.131(b)(2)(iv) for the contaminants or contaminant groups listed in §141.64, and at or above the levels prescribed by §141.25(c) for radioactive contaminants.

(e) A State that has primary enforcement responsibility may adopt by rule, after notice and comment, alternative requirements for the form and content of the reports. The alternative requirements must provide the same type and amount of information as required by §§141.153 and 141.154, and must be designed to achieve an equivalent level of public information and education as would be achieved under this subpart.

(f) For purpose of §§141.154 and 141.155 of this subpart, the term “primacy agency” refers to the State or tribal government entity that has jurisdiction over, and primary enforcement responsibility for, public water systems, even if that government does not have interim or final primary enforcement responsibility for this rule. Where the State or tribe does not have primary enforcement responsibility for public water systems, the term “primacy agency” refers to the appropriate EPA regional office.

[63 FR 44526, Aug. 19, 1998, as amended at 71 FR 483, Jan. 4, 2006]

§141.152   Effective dates.

(a) The regulations in this subpart shall take effect on September 18, 1998.

(b) Each existing community water system must deliver its first report by October 19, 1999, its second report by July 1, 2000, and subsequent reports by July 1 annually thereafter. The first report must contain data collected during, or prior to, calendar year 1998 as prescribed in §141.153(d)(3). Each report thereafter must contain data collected during, or prior to, the previous calendar year.

(c) A new community water system must deliver its first report by July 1 of the year after its first full calendar year in operation and annually thereafter.

(d) A community water system that sells water to another community water system must deliver the applicable information required in §141.153 to the buyer system:

(1) No later than April 19, 1999, by April 1, 2000, and by April 1 annually thereafter or

(2) On a date mutually agreed upon by the seller and the purchaser, and specifically included in a contract between the parties.

§141.153   Content of the reports.

(a) Each community water system must provide to its customers an annual report that contains the information specified in this section and §141.154.

(b) Information on the source of the water delivered:

(1) Each report must identify the source(s) of the water delivered by the community water system by providing information on:

(i) The type of the water: e.g., surface water, ground water; and

(ii) The commonly used name (if any) and location of the body (or bodies) of water.

(2) If a source water assessment has been completed, the report must notify consumers of the availability of this information and the means to obtain it. In addition, systems are encouraged to highlight in the report significant sources of contamination in the source water area if they have readily available information. Where a system has received a source water assessment from the primacy agency, the report must include a brief summary of the system's susceptibility to potential sources of contamination, using language provided by the primacy agency or written by the operator.

(c) Definitions. (1) Each report must include the following definitions:

(i) Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

(ii) Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

(2) A report for a community water system operating under a variance or an exemption issued under §1415 or 1416 of SDWA must include the following definition: Variances and Exemptions: State or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions.

(3) A report that contains data on contaminants that EPA regulates using any of the following terms must include the applicable definitions:

(i) Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

(ii) Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

(iii) Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

(iv) Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

(4) A report that contains information regarding a Level 1 or Level 2 Assessment required under Subpart Y of this part must include the applicable definitions:

(i) Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.

(ii) Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.

(d) Information on detected contaminants.

(1) This sub-section specifies the requirements for information to be included in each report for contaminants subject to mandatory monitoring (except Cryptosporidium). It applies to:

(i) Contaminants subject to a MCL, action level, maximum residual disinfectant level, or treatment technique (regulated contaminants).

(ii) Contaminants for which monitoring is required by §141.40 (unregulated contaminants); and

(iii) Disinfection by-products or microbial contaminants for which monitoring is required by §§141.142 and 141.143, except as provided under paragraph (e)(1) of this section, and which are detected in the finished water.

(2) The data relating to these contaminants must be displayed in one table or in several adjacent tables. Any additional monitoring results which a community water system chooses to include in its report must be displayed separately.

(3) The data must be derived from data collected to comply with EPA and State monitoring and analytical requirements during calendar year 1998 for the first report and subsequent calendar years thereafter except that:

(i) Where a system is allowed to monitor for regulated contaminants less often than once a year, the table(s) must include the date and results of the most recent sampling and the report must include a brief statement indicating that the data presented in the report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the regulations. No data older than 5 years need be included.

(ii) Results of monitoring in compliance with §§141.142 and 141.143 need only be included for 5 years from the date of last sample or until any of the detected contaminants becomes regulated and subject to routine monitoring requirements, whichever comes first.

(4) For detected regulated contaminants (listed in appendix A to this subpart), the table(s) must contain:

(i) The MCL for that contaminant expressed as a number equal to or greater than 1.0 (as provided in appendix A to this subpart);

(ii) The MCLG for that contaminant expressed in the same units as the MCL;

(iii) If there is no MCL for a detected contaminant, the table must indicate that there is a treatment technique, or specify the action level, applicable to that contaminant, and the report must include the definitions for treatment technique and/or action level, as appropriate, specified in paragraph (c)(3) of this section;

(iv) For contaminants subject to an MCL, except turbidity, total coliform, fecal coliform and E. coli, the highest contaminant level used to determine compliance with an NPDWR and the range of detected levels, as follows:

(A) When compliance with the MCL is determined annually or less frequently: The highest detected level at any sampling point and the range of detected levels expressed in the same units as the MCL.

(B) When compliance with the MCL is determined by calculating a running annual average of all samples taken at a monitoring location: the highest average of any of the monitoring locations and the range of all monitoring locations expressed in the same units as the MCL. For the MCLs for TTHM and HAA5 in §141.64(b)(2), systems must include the highest locational running annual average for TTHM and HAA5 and the range of individual sample results for all monitoring locations expressed in the same units as the MCL. If more than one location exceeds the TTHM or HAA5 MCL, the system must include the locational running annual averages for all locations that exceed the MCL.

(C) When compliance with the MCL is determined on a system-wide basis by calculating a running annual average of all samples at all monitoring locations: the average and range of detection expressed in the same units as the MCL. The system is required to include individual sample results for the IDSE conducted under subpart U of this part when determining the range of TTHM and HAA5 results to be reported in the annual consumer confidence report for the calendar year that the IDSE samples were taken.

Note to paragraph (d)(4)(iv): When rounding of results to determine compliance with the MCL is allowed by the regulations, rounding should be done prior to multiplying the results by the factor listed in appendix A of this subpart.

(v) For turbidity.

(A) When it is reported pursuant to §141.13: The highest average monthly value.

(B) When it is reported pursuant to the requirements of §141.71: the highest monthly value. The report should include an explanation of the reasons for measuring turbidity.

(C) When it is reported pursuant to §141.73 or §141.173 or §141.551: the highest single measurement and the lowest monthly percentage of samples meeting the turbidity limits specified in §141.73 or §141.173, or §141.551 for the filtration technology being used. The report should include an explanation of the reasons for measuring turbidity;

(vi) For lead and copper: the 90th percentile value of the most recent round of sampling and the number of sampling sites exceeding the action level;

(vii) For total coliform analytical results until March 31, 2016:

(A) The highest monthly number of positive samples for systems collecting fewer than 40 samples per month; or

(B) The highest monthly percentage of positive samples for systems collecting at least 40 samples per month;

(viii) For fecal coliform and E. coli until March 31, 2016: The total number of positive samples;

(ix) The likely source(s) of detected contaminants to the best of the operator's knowledge. Specific information regarding contaminants may be available in sanitary surveys and source water assessments, and should be used when available to the operator. If the operator lacks specific information on the likely source, the report must include one or more of the typical sources for that contaminant listed in appendix A to this subpart that is most applicable to the system.

(x) For E. coli analytical results under subpart Y: The total number of positive samples.

(5) If a community water system distributes water to its customers from multiple hydraulically independent distribution systems that are fed by different raw water sources, the table should contain a separate column for each service area and the report should identify each separate distribution system. Alternatively, systems could produce separate reports tailored to include data for each service area.

(6) The table(s) must clearly identify any data indicating violations of MCLs, MRDLs, or treatment techniques, and the report must contain a clear and readily understandable explanation of the violation including: the length of the violation, the potential adverse health effects, and actions taken by the system to address the violation. To describe the potential health effects, the system must use the relevant language of appendix A to this subpart.

(7) For detected unregulated contaminants for which monitoring is required (except Cryptosporidium), the table(s) must contain the average and range at which the contaminant was detected. The report may include a brief explanation of the reasons for monitoring for unregulated contaminants.

(e) Information on Cryptosporidium, radon, and other contaminants:

(1) If the system has performed any monitoring for Cryptosporidium, including monitoring performed to satisfy the requirements of §141.143, which indicates that Cryptosporidium may be present in the source water or the finished water, the report must include:

(i) A summary of the results of the monitoring; and

(ii) An explanation of the significance of the results.

(2) If the system has performed any monitoring for radon which indicates that radon may be present in the finished water, the report must include:

(i) The results of the monitoring; and

(ii) An explanation of the significance of the results.

(3) If the system has performed additional monitoring which indicates the presence of other contaminants in the finished water, EPA strongly encourages systems to report any results which may indicate a health concern. To determine if results may indicate a health concern, EPA recommends that systems find out if EPA has proposed an NPDWR or issued a health advisory for that contaminant by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). EPA considers detects above a proposed MCL or health advisory level to indicate possible health concerns. For such contaminants, EPA recommends that the report include:

(i) The results of the monitoring; and

(ii) An explanation of the significance of the results noting the existence of a health advisory or a proposed regulation.

(f) Compliance with NPDWR. In addition to the requirements of §141.153(d)(6), the report must note any violation that occurred during the year covered by the report of a requirement listed below, and include a clear and readily understandable explanation of the violation, any potential adverse health effects, and the steps the system has taken to correct the violation.

(1) Monitoring and reporting of compliance data;

(2) Filtration and disinfection prescribed by subpart H of this part. For systems which have failed to install adequate filtration or disinfection equipment or processes, or have had a failure of such equipment or processes which constitutes a violation, the report must include the following language as part of the explanation of potential adverse health effects: Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.

(3) Lead and copper control requirements prescribed by subpart I of this part. For systems that fail to take one or more actions prescribed by §§141.80(d), 141.81, 141.82, 141.83 or 141.84, the report must include the applicable language of appendix A to this subpart for lead, copper, or both.

(4) Treatment techniques for Acrylamide and Epichlorohydrin prescribed by subpart K of this part. For systems that violate the requirements of subpart K of this part, the report must include the relevant language from appendix A to this subpart.

(5) Recordkeeping of compliance data.

(6) Special monitoring requirements prescribed by §§141.40 and 141.41; and

(7) Violation of the terms of a variance, an exemption, or an administrative or judicial order.

(g) Variances and Exemptions. If a system is operating under the terms of a variance or an exemption issued under §1415 or 1416 of SDWA, the report must contain:

(1) An explanation of the reasons for the variance or exemption;

(2) The date on which the variance or exemption was issued;

(3) A brief status report on the steps the system is taking to install treatment, find alternative sources of water, or otherwise comply with the terms and schedules of the variance or exemption; and

(4) A notice of any opportunity for public input in the review, or renewal, of the variance or exemption.

(h) Additional information:

(1) The report must contain a brief explanation regarding contaminants which may reasonably be expected to be found in drinking water including bottled water. This explanation may include the language of paragraphs (h)(1) (i) through (iii) or systems may use their own comparable language. The report also must include the language of paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section.

(i) The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

(ii) Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

(iii) In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

(iv) Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

(2) The report must include the telephone number of the owner, operator, or designee of the community water system as a source of additional information concerning the report.

(3) In communities with a large proportion of non-English speaking residents, as determined by the Primacy Agency, the report must contain information in the appropriate language(s) regarding the importance of the report or contain a telephone number or address where such residents may contact the system to obtain a translated copy of the report or assistance in the appropriate language.

(4) The report must include information (e.g., time and place of regularly scheduled board meetings) about opportunities for public participation in decisions that may affect the quality of the water.

(5) The systems may include such additional information as they deem necessary for public education consistent with, and not detracting from, the purpose of the report.

(6) Systems required to comply with subpart S. (i) Any ground water system that receives notice from the State of a significant deficiency or notice from a laboratory of a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample that is not invalidated by the State under §141.402(d) must inform its customers of any significant deficiency that is uncorrected at the time of the next report or of any fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample in the next report. The system must continue to inform the public annually until the State determines that particular significant deficiency is corrected or the fecal contamination in the ground water source is addressed under §141.403(a). Each report must include the following elements.

(A) The nature of the particular significant deficiency or the source of the fecal contamination (if the source is known) and the date the significant deficiency was identified by the State or the dates of the fecal indicator-positive ground water source samples;

(B) If the fecal contamination in the ground water source has been addressed under §141.403(a) and the date of such action;

(C) For each significant deficiency or fecal contamination in the ground water source that has not been addressed under §141.403(a), the State-approved plan and schedule for correction, including interim measures, progress to date, and any interim measures completed; and

(D) If the system receives notice of a fecal indicator-positive ground water source sample that is not invalidated by the State under §141.402(d), the potential health effects using the health effects language of Appendix A of subpart O.

(ii) If directed by the State, a system with significant deficiencies that have been corrected before the next report is issued must inform its customers of the significant deficiency, how the deficiency was corrected, and the date of correction under paragraph (h)(6)(i) of this section.

(7) Systems required to comply with subpart Y. (i) Any system required to comply with the Level 1 assessment requirement or a Level 2 assessment requirement that is not due to an E. coli MCL violation must include in the report the text found in paragraph (h)(7)(i)(A) and paragraphs (h)(7)(i)(B) and (C) of this section as appropriate, filling in the blanks accordingly and the text found in paragraphs (h)(7)(i)(D)(1) and (2) of this section if appropriate.

(A) Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, waterborne pathogens may be present or that a potential pathway exists through which contamination may enter the drinking water distribution system. We found coliforms indicating the need to look for potential problems in water treatment or distribution. When this occurs, we are required to conduct assessment(s) to identify problems and to correct any problems that were found during these assessments.

(B) During the past year we were required to conduct [INSERT NUMBER OF LEVEL 1ASSESSMENTS] Level 1 assessment(s). [INSERT NUMBER OF LEVEL 1 ASSESSMENTS] Level 1 assessment(s) were completed. In addition, we were required to take [INSERT NUMBER OF CORRECTIVE ACTIONS] corrective actions and we completed [INSERT NUMBER OF CORRECTIVE ACTIONS] of these actions.

(C) During the past year [INSERT NUMBER OF LEVEL 2 ASSESSMENTS] Level 2 assessments were required to be completed for our water system. [INSERT NUMBER OF LEVEL 2 ASSESSMENTS] Level 2 assessments were completed. In addition, we were required to take [INSERT NUMBER OF CORRECTIVE ACTIONS] corrective actions and we completed [INSERT NUMBER OF CORRECTIVE ACTIONS] of these actions.

(D) Any system that has failed to complete all the required assessments or correct all identified sanitary defects, is in violation of the treatment technique requirement and must also include one or both of the following statements, as appropriate:

(1) During the past year we failed to conduct all of the required assessment(s).

(2) During the past year we failed to correct all identified defects that were found during the assessment.

(ii) Any system required to conduct a Level 2 assessment due to an E. coli MCL violation must include in the report the text found in paragraphs (h)(7)(ii)(A) and (B) of this section, filling in the blanks accordingly and the text found in paragraphs (h)(7)(ii)(C)(1) and (2) of this section, if appropriate.

(A) E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Human pathogens in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a greater health risk for infants, young children, the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems. We found E. coli bacteria, indicating the need to look for potential problems in water treatment or distribution. When this occurs, we are required to conduct assessment(s) to identify problems and to correct any problems that were found during these assessments.

(B) We were required to complete a Level 2 assessment because we found E. coli in our water system. In addition, we were required to take [INSERT NUMBER OF CORRECTIVE ACTIONS] corrective actions and we completed [INSERT NUMBER OF CORRECTIVE ACTIONS] of these actions.

(C) Any system that has failed to complete the required assessment or correct all identified sanitary defects, is in violation of the treatment technique requirement and must also include one or both of the following statements, as appropriate:

(1) We failed to conduct the required assessment.

(2) We failed to correct all sanitary defects that were identified during the assessment that we conducted.

(iii) If a system detects E. coli and has violated the E. coli MCL, in addition to completing the table as required in paragraph (d)(4) of this section, the system must include one or more of the following statements to describe any noncompliance, as applicable:

(A) We had an E. coli-positive repeat sample following a total coliform-positive routine sample.

(B) We had a total coliform-positive repeat sample following an E. coli-positive routine sample.

(C) We failed to take all required repeat samples following an E. coli-positive routine sample.

(D) We failed to test for E. coli when any repeat sample tests positive for total coliform.

(iv) If a system detects E. coli and has not violated the E. coli MCL, in addition to completing the table as required in paragraph (d)(4) of this section, the system may include a statement that explains that although they have detected E. coli, they are not in violation of the E. coli MCL.

[63 FR 44526, Aug. 19, 1998, as amended at 63 FR 69516, Dec. 16, 1998; 64 FR 34733, June 29, 1999; 65 FR 26022, May 4, 2000; 67 FR 1836, Jan. 14, 2002; 71 FR 483, Jan. 4, 2006; 71 FR 65651, Nov. 8, 2006; 78 FR 10348, Feb. 13, 2013]

§141.154   Required additional health information.

(a) All reports must prominently display the following language: Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

(b) Ending in the report due by July 1, 2001, a system which detects arsenic at levels above 0.025 mg/L, but below the 0.05 mg/L, and beginning in the report due by July 1, 2002, a system that detects arsenic above 0.005 mg/L and up to and including 0.010 mg/L:

(1) Must include in its report a short informational statement about arsenic, using language such as: While your drinking water meets EPA's standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPA's standard balances the current understanding of arsenic's possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.

(2) May write its own educational statement, but only in consultation with the Primacy Agency.

(c) A system which detects nitrate at levels above 5 mg/l, but below the MCL:

(1) Must include a short informational statement about the impacts of nitrate on children using language such as: Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.

(2) May write its own educational statement, but only in consultation with the Primacy Agency.

(d) Every report must include the following lead-specific information:

(1) A short informational statement about lead in drinking water and its effects on children. The statement must include the following information:

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. [NAME OF UTILITY] is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

(2) A system may write its own educational statement, but only in consultation with the State.

(e) Community water systems that detect TTHM above 0.080 mg/l, but below the MCL in §141.12, as an annual average, monitored and calculated under the provisions of §141.30, must include health effects language for TTHMs prescribed by appendix A.

(f) Beginning in the report due by July 1, 2002, and ending January 22, 2006, a community water system that detects arsenic above 0.010 mg/L and up to and including 0.05 mg/L must include the arsenic health effects language prescribed by appendix A to subpart O of this part.

[63 FR 44526, Aug. 19, 1998, as amended at 63 FR 69475, Dec. 16, 1998; 64 FR 34733, June 29, 1999; 65 FR 26023, May 4, 2000; 66 FR 7064, Jan. 22, 2001; 68 FR 14506, Mar. 25, 2003; 72 FR 57820, Oct. 10, 2007]

§141.155   Report delivery and recordkeeping.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, each community water system must mail or otherwise directly deliver one copy of the report to each customer.

(b) The system must make a good faith effort to reach consumers who do not get water bills, using means recommended by the primacy agency. EPA expects that an adequate good faith effort will be tailored to the consumers who are served by the system but are not bill-paying customers, such as renters or workers. A good faith effort to reach consumers would include a mix of methods appropriate to the particular system such as: Posting the reports on the Internet; mailing to postal patrons in metropolitan areas; advertising the availability of the report in the news media; publication in a local newspaper; posting in public places such as cafeterias or lunch rooms of public buildings; delivery of multiple copies for distribution by single-biller customers such as apartment buildings or large private employers; delivery to community organizations.

(c) No later than the date the system is required to distribute the report to its customers, each community water system must mail a copy of the report to the primacy agency, followed within 3 months by a certification that the report has been distributed to customers, and that the information is correct and consistent with the compliance monitoring data previously submitted to the primacy agency.

(d) No later than the date the system is required to distribute the report to its customers, each community water system must deliver the report to any other agency or clearinghouse identified by the primacy agency.

(e) Each community water system must make its reports available to the public upon request.

(f) Each community water system serving 100,000 or more persons must post its current year's report to a publicly-accessible site on the Internet.

(g) The Governor of a State or his designee, or the Tribal Leader where the tribe has met the eligibility requirements contained in §142.72 for the purposes of waiving the mailing requirement, can waive the requirement of paragraph (a) of this section for community water systems serving fewer than 10,000 persons. In consultation with the tribal government, the Regional Administrator may waive the requirement of §141.155(a) in areas in Indian country where no tribe has been deemed eligible.

(1) Such systems must:

(i) Publish the reports in one or more local newspapers serving the area in which the system is located;

(ii) Inform the customers that the reports will not be mailed, either in the newspapers in which the reports are published or by other means approved by the State; and

(iii) Make the reports available to the public upon request.

(2) Systems serving 500 or fewer persons may forego the requirements of paragraphs (g)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section if they provide notice at least once per year to their customers by mail, door-to-door delivery or by posting in an appropriate location that the report is available upon request.

(h) Any system subject to this subpart must retain copies of its Consumer Confidence Report for no less than 3 years.

[63 FR 44526, Aug. 19, 1998, as amended at 65 FR 26023, May 4, 2000]

Appendix A to Subpart O of Part 141—Regulated Contaminants

Contaminant (units)Traditional MCL in mg/LTo convert for CCR, multiply byMCL in CCR unitsMCLGMajor sources in drinking waterHealth effects language
Microbiological contaminants:
Total Coliform Bacteria †MCL (systems that collect ≥40 samples/month) 5% of monthly samples are positive; (systems that collect <40 samples/month) 1 positive monthly sampleMCL (systems that collect ≥40 samples/month) 5% of monthly samples are positive; (systems that collect <40 samples/month) 1 positive monthly sample.0Naturally present in the environmentColiforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.
Total Coliform Bacteria ‡TTTTN/ANaturally present in the environmentUse language found in §141.153(h)(7)(i)(A)
Fecal coliform and E. coli000Human and animal fecal wasteFecal coliforms and E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, some of the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems.
E. coliRoutine and repeat samples are total coliform-positive and either is E. coli-positive or system fails to take repeat samples following E. coli-positive routine sample or system fails to analyze total coliform-positive repeat sample for E. coliRoutine and repeat samples are total coliform-positive and either is E. coli-positive or system fails to take repeat samples following E. coli-positive routine sample or system fails to analyze total coliform-positive repeat sample for E. coli0Human and animal fecal wasteE. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Human pathogens in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a greater health risk for infants, young children, the elderly, and people with severely-compromised immune systems.
Fecal Indicators (enterococci or coliphage)TTTTN/AHuman and animal fecal wasteFecal indicators are microbes whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term health effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, some of the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems.
Total organic carbon (ppm)TTTTN/ANaturally present in the environmentTotal organic carbon (TOC) has no health effects. However, total organic carbon provides a medium for the formation of disinfection by products. These byproducts include trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Drinking water containing these byproducts in excess of the MCL may lead to adverse health effects, liver or kidney problems, or nervous system effects, and may lead to an increased risk of getting cancer.
Turbidity (NTU)TTTTN/ASoil runoffTurbidity has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea and associated headaches.
Radioactive contaminants:
Beta/photon emitters (mrem/yr)4 mrem/yr40Decay of natural and man-made depositsCertain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink water containing beta particle and photon radioactivity in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Alpha emitters (pCi/L)15 pCi/L150Erosion of natural depositsCertain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing alpha emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Combined radium (pCi/L)5 pCi/L50Erosion of natural depositsSome people who drink water containing radium-226 or -228 in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Uranium (pCi/L)30 µg/L300Erosion of natural depositsSome people who drink water containing uranium in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer and kidney toxicity.
Inorganic contaminants:
Antimony (ppb).006100066Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solderSome people who drink water containing antimony well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience increases in blood cholesterol and decreases in blood sugar.
Arsenic (ppb)10.0101000110.10Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastesSome people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Asbestos (MFL)7 MFL77Decay of asbestos cement water mains; Erosion of natural depositsSome people who drink water containing asbestos in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of developing benign intestinal polyps.
Barium (ppm)222Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural depositsSome people who drink water containing barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their blood pressure.
Beryllium (ppb).004100044Discharge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; Discharge from electrical, aerospace, and defense industriesSome people who drink water containing beryllium well in excess of the MCL over many years could develop intestinal lesions
Bromate (ppb).0101000100By-product of drinkig water disinfectionSome people who drink water of containing bromate in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Cadmium (ppb).005100055Corrosion of galvanized pipes; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from metal refineries; Runoff from waste batteries and paintsSome people who drink water containing cadmium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience kidney damage.
Chloramines (ppm)MRDL=4MRDL=4MRDLG=4Water additive used to control microbesSome people who use water containing chloramines well in excess of the MRDL could experience irritating effects to their eyes and nose. Some people who drink water containing chloramines well in excess of the MRDL could experience stomach discomfort or anemia.
Chlorine (ppm)MRDL=4MRDL=4MRDLG=4Water additive used to control microbesSome people who use water containing chlorine well in excess of the MRDL could experience irritating effects to their eyes and nose. Some people who drink water containing chlorine well in excess of the MRDL could experience stomach discomfort.
Chlorine dioxide (ppb)MRDL=.81000MRDL=800MRDLG=800Water additive used to control micorbesSome infants and young children who drink water chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL could experience nervous system effects. Similar effects may occur in fetuses of pregnant women who drink water containing chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL. Some people may experience anemia.
Chlorite (ppm)110.8By-product of drinking water disinfectionSome infants and young children who drink water containing chlorite in excess of the MCL could experience nervous system effects. Similar effects may occur in fetuses of pregnant women who drink water containing chlorite in excess of the MCL. Some people may experience anemia.
Chromium (ppb).11000100100Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural depositsSome people who use water containing chromium well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience allergic dermatitis.
Copper (ppm)AL=1.3AL=1.31.3Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural depositsCopper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson's disease should consult their personal doctor.
Cyanide (ppb).21000200200Discharge from steel/metal factories; Discharge from plastic and fertilizer factoriesSome people who drink water containing cyanide well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience nerve damage or problems with their thyroid.
Fluoride (ppm)444Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factoriesSome people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Fluoride in drinking water at half the MCL or more may cause mottling of children's teeth, usually in children less than nine years old. Mottling, also known as dental fluorosis, may include brown staining and/or pitting of the teeth, and occurs only in developing teeth before they erupt from the gums.
Lead (ppb)AL=.0151000AL=150Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural depositsInfants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure.
Mercury [inorganic] (ppb).002100022Erosion of natural deposits; Dis charge from refineries and factories; Runoff from landfills; Runoff from croplandSome people who drink water containing inorganic mercury well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience kidney damage.
Nitrate (ppm)101010Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sew age; Erosion of natural depositsInfants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.
Nitrite (ppm)111Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sew age; Erosion of natural depositsInfants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrite in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.
Selenium (ppb).0510005050Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from minesSelenium is an essential nutrient. However, some people who drink water containing selenium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience hair or fingernail losses, numbness in fingers or toes, or problems with their circulation.
Thallium (ppb).002100020.5Leaching from ore-processing sites; Discharge from electronics, glass, and drug factoriesSome people who drink water containing thallium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience hair loss, changes in their blood, or problems with their kidneys, intestines, or liver.
Synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides and herbicides:
2,4-D (ppb).0710007070Runoff from herbicide used on row cropsSome people who drink water containing the weed killer 2,4-D well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their kidneys, liver, or adrenal glands.
2,4,5-TP [Silvex](ppb).0510005050Residue of banned herbicideSome people who drink water containing silvex in excess of the MCL over many years could experience liver problems.
AcrylamideTTTT0Added to water during sewage/wastewater treatmentSome people who drink water containing high levels of acrylamide over a long period of time could have problems with their nervous system or blood, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Alachlor (ppb).002100020Runoff from herbicide used on row cropsSome people who drink water containing alachlor in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their eyes, liver, kidneys, or spleen, or experience anemia, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Atrazine (ppb).003100033Runoff from herbicide used on row cropsSome people who drink water containing atrazine well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their cardiovascular system or reproductive difficulties.
Benzo(a)pyrene [PAH] (nanograms/l).00021,000,0002000Leaching from linings of water storage tanks and distribution linesSome people who drink water containing benzo(a)pyrene in excess of the MCL over many years may experience reproductive difficulties and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Carbofuran (ppb).0410004040Leaching of soil fumigant used on rice and alfalfaSome people who drink water containing carbofuran in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their blood, or nervous or reproductive systems.
Chlordane (ppb).002100020Residue of banned termiticideSome people who drink water containing chlordane in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or nervous system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Dalapon (ppb).21000200200Runoff from herbicide used on rights of waySome people who drink water containing dalapon well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience minor kidney changes.
Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (ppb).41000400400Discharge from chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience toxic effects such as weight loss, liver enlargement or possible reproductive difficulties.
Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (ppb).006100060Discharge from rubber and chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate well in excess of the MCL over many years may have problems with their liver, or experience reproductive difficulties, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Dibromochloropropane (ppt).00021,000,0002000Runoff/leaching from soil fumigant used on soybeans, cotton, pineapples, and orchardsSome people who drink water containing DBCP in excess of the MCL over many years could experience reproductive problems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Dinoseb (ppb).007100077Runoff from herbicide used on soybeans and vegetablesSome people who drink water containing dinoseb well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience reproductive difficulties.
Diquat (ppb).0210002020Runoff from herbicide useSome people who drink water containing diquat in excess of the MCL over many years could get cataracts.
Dioxin [2,3,7,8-TCDD] (ppq).000000031,000,000, 000300Emissions from waste incineration and other combustion; Discharge from chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing dioxin in excess of the MCL over many years could experience reproductive difficulties and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Endothall (ppb).11000100100Runoff from herbicide useSome people who drink water containing endothall in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their stomach or intestines.
Endrin (ppb).002100022Residue of banned insecticideSome people who drink water containing endrin in excess of the MCL over many years could experience liver problems.
EpichlorohydrinTTTT0Discharge from industrial chemical factories; An impurity of some water treatment chemicalsSome people who drink water containing high levels of epichlorohydrin over a long period of time could experience stomach problems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Ethylene dibromide (ppt).000051,000,000500Discharge from petroleum refineriesSome people who drink water containing ethylene dibromide in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver, stomach, reproductive system, or kidneys, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Glyphosate (ppb).71000700700Runoff from herbicide useSome people who drink water containing glyphosate in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their kidneys or reproductive difficulties.
Heptachlor (ppt).00041,000,0004000Residue of banned pesticideSome people who drink water containing heptachlor in excess of the MCL over many years could experience liver damage and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Heptachlor epoxide (ppt).00021,000,0002000Breakdown of heptachlorSome people who drink water containing heptachlor epoxide in excess of the MCL over many years could experience liver damage, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Hexachlorobenzene (ppb).001100010Discharge from metal refineries and agricultural chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing hexachlorobenzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or kidneys, or adverse reproductive effects, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene (ppb).0510005050Discharge from chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing hexachlorocyclopentadiene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their kidneys or stomach.
Lindane (ppt).00021,000,000200200Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on cattle, lumber, gardensSome people who drink water containing lindane in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their kidneys or liver.
Methoxychlor (ppb).0410004040Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on fruits, vegetables, alfalfa, livestockSome people who drink water containing methoxychlor in excess of the MCL over many years could experience reproductive difficulties.
Oxamyl [Vydate] (ppb).21000200200Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on apples, potatoes and tomatoesSome people who drink water containing oxamyl in excess of the MCL over many years could experience slight nervous system effects.
PCBs [Polychlorinated biphenyls] (ppt).00051,000,0005000Runoff from landfills; Discharge of waste chemicalsSome people who drink water containing PCBs in excess of the MCL over many years could experience changes in their skin, problems with their thymus gland, immune deficiencies, or reproductive or nervous system difficulties, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Pentachlorophenol (ppb).001100010Discharge from wood preserving factoriesSome people who drink water containing pentachlorophenol in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or kidneys, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Picloram (ppb).51000500500Herbicide runoffSome people who drink water containing picloram in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.
Simazine (ppb).004100044Herbicide runoffSome people who drink water containing simazine in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their blood.
Toxaphene (ppb).003100030Runoff/leaching from insecticide used on cotton and cattleSome people who drink water containing toxaphene in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their kidneys, liver, or thyroid, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Volatile organic contaminants:
Benzene (ppb).005100050Discharge from factories; Leaching from gas storage tanks and landfillsSome people who drink water containing benzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience anemia or a decrease in blood platelets, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Carbon tetrachloride (ppb).005100050Discharge from chemical plants and other industrial activitiesSome people who drink water containing carbon tetrachloride in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Chlorobenzene (ppb).11000100100Discharge from chemical and agricultural chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing chlorobenzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or kidneys.
o-Dichlorobenzene (ppb).61000600600Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing o-dichlorobenzene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or circulatory systems.
p-Dichlorobenzene (ppb).07510007575Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing p-dichlorobenzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience anemia, damage to their liver, kidneys, or spleen, or changes in their blood.
1,2-Dichloroethane (ppb).005100050Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing 1,2-dichloroethane in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
1,1-Dichloroethylene (ppb).007100077Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing 1,1-dichloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.
cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene (ppb).0710007070Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing cis-1,2-dichloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.
trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (ppb).11000100100Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing trans-1,2-dichloroethylene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.
Dichloromethane (ppb).005100050Discharge from pharmaceutical and chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing dichloromethane in excess of the MCL over many years could have liver problems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
1,2-Dichloropropane (ppb).005100050Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing 1,2-dichloropropane in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Ethylbenzene (ppb).71000700700Discharge from petroleum refineriesSome people who drink water containing ethylbenzene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or kidneys.
Haloacetic Acids (HAA) (ppb).060100060N/ABy-product of drinking water disinfectionSome people who drink water containing haloacetic acids in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Styrene (ppb).11000100100Discharge from rubber and plastic factories; Leaching from landfillsSome people who drink water containing styrene well in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their liver, kidneys, or circulatory system.
Tetrachloroethylene (ppb).005100050Discharge from factories and dry cleanersSome people who drink water containing tetrachloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their liver, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene (ppb).0710007070Discharge from textile-finishing factoriesSome people who drink water containing 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience changes in their adrenal glands.
1,1,1-Trichloroethane (ppb).21000200200Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factoriesSome people who drink water containing 1,1,1-trichloroethane in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver, nervous system, or circulatory system.
1,1,2-Trichloroethane (ppb).005100053Discharge from industrial chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing 1,1,2-trichloroethane well in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their liver, kidneys, or immune systems.
Trichloroethylene (ppb).005100050Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factoriesSome people who drink water containing trichloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
TTHMs [Total trihalomethanes] (ppb)0.10/.0801000100/80N/ABy-product of drinking water disinfectionSome people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Toluene (ppm)111Discharge from petroleum factoriesSome people who drink water containing toluene well in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their nervous system, kidneys, or liver.
Vinyl Chloride (ppb).002100020Leaching from PVC piping; Discharge from plastics factoriesSome people who drink water containing vinyl chloride in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Xylenes (ppm)101010Discharge from petroleum factories; Discharge from chemical factoriesSome people who drink water containing xylenes in excess of the MCL over many years could experience damage to their nervous system.

†Until March 31, 2016.

‡ Beginning April 1, 2016.

1These arsenic values are effective January 23, 2006. Until then, the MCL is 0.05 mg/L and there is no MCLG.

Key:

AL = Action Level

MCL = Maximum Contaminant Level

MCLG = Maximum Contaminant Level Goal

MFL = million fibers per liter

MRDL = Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level

MRDLG = Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal

mrem/year = millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)

N/A = Not Applicable

NTU = Nephelometric Turbidity Units (a measure of water clarity)

pCi/l = picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)

ppm = parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l)

ppb = parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (µg/l)

ppt = parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter

ppq = parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter

TT = Treatment Technique

[65 FR 26024, May 4, 2000, as amended at 65 FR 76749, Dec. 7, 2000; 66 FR 7064, Jan. 22, 2001; 67 FR 70855, Nov. 27, 2002; 67 FR 73011, Dec. 9, 2002; 68 FR 14506, Mar. 25, 2003; 71 FR 65652, Nov. 8, 2006; 78 FR 10349, Feb. 13, 2013]



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