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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 63—NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)


Subpart EEEEEEE—National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Gold Mine Ore Processing and Production Area Source Category


Contents

Applicability and Compliance Dates

§63.11640   Am I subject to this subpart?
§63.11641   What are my compliance dates?

Standards and Compliance Requirements

§63.11645   What are my mercury emission standards?
§63.11646   What are my compliance requirements?
§63.11647   What are my monitoring requirements?
§63.11648   What are my notification, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements?

Other Requirements and Information

§63.11650   What General Provisions apply to this subpart?
§63.11651   What definitions apply to this subpart?
§63.11652   Who implements and enforces this subpart?
§63.11653   [Reserved]
Table 1 to Subpart EEEEEEE of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart EEEEEE

Source: 76 FR 9480, Feb. 17, 2011, unless otherwise noted.

Applicability and Compliance Dates

§63.11640   Am I subject to this subpart?

(a) You are subject to this subpart if you own or operate a gold mine ore processing and production facility as defined in §63.11651, that is an area source.

(b) This subpart applies to each new or existing affected source. The affected sources are each collection of “ore pretreatment processes” at a gold mine ore processing and production facility, each collection of “carbon processes with mercury retorts” at a gold mine ore processing and production facility, each collection of “carbon processes without mercury retorts” at a gold mine ore processing and production facility, and each collection of “non-carbon concentrate processes” at a gold mine ore processing and production facility, as defined in §63.11651.

(1) An affected source is existing if you commenced construction or reconstruction of the affected source on or before April 28, 2010.

(2) An affected source is new if you commenced construction or reconstruction of the affected source after April 28, 2010.

(c) This subpart does not apply to research and development facilities, as defined in section 112(c)(7) of the Clean Air Act (CAA).

(d) If you own or operate a source subject to this subpart, you must have or you must obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71.

§63.11641   What are my compliance dates?

(a) If you own or operate an existing affected source, you must comply with the applicable provisions of this subpart no later than February 17, 2014.

(b) If you own or operate a new affected source, and the initial startup of your affected source is on or before February 17, 2011, you must comply with the provisions of this subpart no later than February 17, 2011.

(c) If you own or operate a new affected source, and the initial startup of your affected source is after February 17, 2011, you must comply with the provisions of this subpart upon startup of your affected source.

Standards and Compliance Requirements

§63.11645   What are my mercury emission standards?

(a) For existing ore pretreatment processes, you must emit no more than 127 pounds of mercury per million tons of ore processed.

(b) For existing carbon processes with mercury retorts, you must emit no more than 2.2 pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate processed.

(c) For existing carbon processes without mercury retorts, you must emit no more than 0.17 pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate processed.

(d) For existing non-carbon concentrate processes, you must emit no more than 0.2 pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate processed.

(e) For new ore pretreatment processes, you must emit no more than 84 pounds of mercury per million tons of ore processed.

(f) For new carbon processes with mercury retorts, you must emit no more than 0.8 pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate processed.

(g) For new carbon processes without mercury retorts, you must emit no more than 0.14 pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate processed.

(h) For new non-carbon concentrate processes, you must emit no more than 0.1 pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate processed.

(i) The standards set forth in this section apply at all times.

§63.11646   What are my compliance requirements?

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, you must conduct a mercury compliance emission test within 180 days of the compliance date for all process units at new and existing affected sources according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(13) of this section. This compliance testing must be repeated annually thereafter, with no two consecutive annual compliance tests occurring less than 3 months apart or more than 15 months apart.

(1) You must determine the concentration of mercury and the volumetric flow rate of the stack gas according to the following test methods and procedures:

(i) Method 1 or 1A (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1) to select sampling port locations and the number of traverse points in each stack or duct. Sampling sites must be located at the outlet of the control device (or at the outlet of the emissions source if no control device is present) and prior to any releases to the atmosphere.

(ii) Method 2, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2F (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-1), or Method 2G (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-2) to determine the volumetric flow rate of the stack gas.

(iii) Method 3, 3A, or 3B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-2) to determine the dry molecular weight of the stack gas. You may use ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10, “Flue and Exhaust Gas Analyses” (incorporated by reference-see §63.14) as an alternative to EPA Method 3B.

(iv) Method 4 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-3) to determine the moisture content of the stack gas.

(v) Method 29 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8) to determine the concentration of mercury, except as provided in paragraphs (a)(1)(vi) and (vii) of this section.

(vi) Upon approval by the permitting authority, ASTM D6784; “Standard Test Method for Elemental, Oxidized, Particle-Bound and Total Mercury in Flue Gas Generated from Coal-Fired Stationary Sources (Ontario Hydro Method)” (incorporated by reference—see §63.14) may be used as an alternative to Method 29 to determine the concentration of mercury.

(vii) Upon approval by the permitting authority, Method 30B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8) may be used as an alternative to Method 29 to determine the concentration of mercury for those process units with relatively low particulate-bound mercury as specified in Section 1.2 of Method 30B.

(2) A minimum of three test runs must be conducted for each performance test of each process unit. Each test run conducted with Method 29 must collect a minimum sample volume of 0.85 dry standard cubic meters (30 dry standard cubic feet). If conducted with Method 30B or ASTM D6784, determine sample time and volume according to the testing criteria set forth in the relevant method. If the emission testing results for any of the emission points yields a non-detect value, then the minimum detection limit (MDL) must be used to calculate the mass emissions rate (lb/hr) used to calculate the emissions factor (lb/ton) for that emission point and, in turn, for calculating the sum of the emissions (in units of pounds of mercury per ton of concentrate, or pounds of mercury per million tons of ore) for all emission points subject to the emission standard for determining compliance. If the resulting mercury emissions are greater than the MACT emission standard, the owner or operator may use procedures that produce lower MDL results and repeat the mercury emissions testing one additional time for any emission point for which the measured result was below the MDL. If this additional testing is performed, the results from that testing must be used to determine compliance (i.e., there are no additional opportunities allowed to lower the MDL).

(3) Performance tests shall be conducted under such conditions as the Administrator specifies to the owner or operator based on representative performance of the affected source for the period being tested. Upon request, the owner or operator shall make available to the Administrator such records as may be necessary to determine the conditions of performance tests. Performance tests must be conducted under operating conditions (including process or production throughputs) that are based on representative performance. Record and report to the permit authority the process throughput for each test run. For sources with multiple emission units (e.g., two roasters, or a furnace, electrowinning circuit and a mercury retort) ducted to a common control device and stack, compliance testing must be performed either by conducting a single compliance test with all affected emissions units in operation or by conducting a separate compliance test on each emissions unit. Alternatively, the owner or operator may request approval from the permit authority for an alternative testing approach. If the units are tested separately, any emissions unit that is not tested initially must be tested as soon as is practicable. If the performance test is conducted when all affected units are operating, then the number of hours of operation used for calculating emissions pursuant to paragraphs (a)(6) and (7) of this section must be the total number of hours for the unit that has the greatest total operating hours for that period of time, or based on an appropriate alternative method approved by the permit authority to account for the hours of operation for each separate unit in these calculations.

(4) Calculate the mercury emission rate (lb/hr), based on the average of 3 test run values, for each process unit (or combination of units that are ducted to a common stack and are tested when all affected sources are operating pursuant to paragraph (a)(3) of this section) using Equation (1) of this section:

eCFR graphic er17fe11.003.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

E = mercury emissions in lb/hr;

Cs = concentration of mercury in the stack gas, in grains per dry standard cubic foot (gr/dscf);

Qs = volumetric flow rate of the stack gas, in dry standard cubic feet per hour; and

K = conversion factor for grains (gr) to pounds (lb), 1.43 × 10−4.

(5) Monitor and record the number of one-hour periods each process unit operates during each month.

(6) For the initial compliance determination for both new and existing sources, determine the total mercury emissions for all the full calendar months between the compliance date and the date of the initial compliance test by multiplying the emission rate in lb/hr for each process unit (or combination of units ducted to a common stack that are tested together) by the number of one-hour periods each process unit (or the unit that had the greatest total operating hours among the combination of multiple units with one stack that are tested together, or an alternative method approved by the permit authority, pursuant to paragraph (a)(3) of this section) operated during those full calendar months prior to the initial compliance test. This initial period must include at least 1 full month of operations. After the initial compliance test, for subsequent compliance tests, determine the mercury mass emissions for the 12 full calendar months prior to the compliance test in accordance with the procedures in paragraph (a)(7) of this section. Existing sources may use a previous emission test for their initial compliance determination in lieu of conducting a new test if the test was conducted within one year of the compliance date using the methods specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section, and the tests were representative of current operating processes and conditions. If a previous test is used for their initial compliance determination, 3 to 12 full months of data on hours of operation and production (i.e., million tons of ore or tons of concentrate), including the month the test was conducted, must be used to calculate the emissions rate (in units of pounds of mercury per million tons of ore for the ore pretreatment affected sources, or in units of pounds of mercury per tons of concentrate for the other affected sources).

(7) For compliance determinations following the initial compliance test for new and existing sources, determine the total mercury mass emissions for each process unit for the 12 full calendar months preceding the performance test by multiplying the emission rate in lb/hr for each process unit (or combination of units ducted to a common stack that are tested together) by the number of one-hour periods each process unit (or the unit that had the greatest total operating hours among the combination of multiple units with one stack that are tested together, or an alternative method approved by the permit authority, pursuant to paragraph (a)(3) of this section) operated during the 12 full calendar months preceding the completion of the performance tests.

(8) You must install, calibrate, maintain and operate an appropriate weight measurement device, mass flow meter, or densitometer and volumetric flow meter to measure ore throughput for each roasting operation and autoclave and calculate hourly, daily and monthly totals in tons of ore according to paragraphs (a)(8)(i) and (a)(8)(ii) of this section.

(i) Measure the weight or the density and volumetric flow rate of the oxidized ore slurry as it exits the roaster oxidation circuit(s) and before the carbon-in-leach tanks. Alternatively, the weight of the ore can be measured “as fed” if approved by the permit authority as an acceptable equivalent method to measure amount of ore processed.

(ii) Measure the weight or the density and volumetric flow rate of the ore slurry as it is fed to the autoclave(s). Alternatively, the weight or the density and volumetric flow rate of the oxidized ore slurry can be measured as it exits the autoclave and before the carbon-in-leach tanks if approved by the permit authority as an acceptable equivalent method to measure amount of ore processed.

(9) Measure the weight of concentrate (produced by electrowinning, Merrill Crowe process, gravity feed, or other methods) using weigh scales for each batch prior to processing in mercury retorts or melt furnaces. For facilities with mercury retorts, the concentrate must be weighed in the same state and condition as it is when fed to the mercury retort. For facilities without mercury retorts, the concentrate must be weighed prior to being fed to the melt furnace before drying in any ovens. For facilities that ship concentrate offsite, measure the weight of concentrate as shipped offsite. You must keep accurate records of the weights of each batch of concentrate processed and calculate, and record the total weight of concentrate processed each month.

(10) You must maintain the systems for measuring density, volumetric flow rate, and weight within ±5 percent accuracy. You must describe the specific equipment used to make measurements at your facility and how that equipment is periodically calibrated. You must also explain, document, and maintain written procedures for determining the accuracy of the measurements and make these written procedures available to your permitting authority upon request. You must determine, record, and maintain a record of the accuracy of the measuring systems before the beginning of your initial compliance test and during each subsequent quarter of affected source operation.

(11) Record the weight in tons of ore for ore pretreatment processes and concentrate for carbon processes with mercury retorts, carbon processes without mercury retorts, and for non-carbon concentrate processes on a daily and monthly basis.

(12) Calculate the emissions from each new and existing affected source for the sum of all full months between the compliance date and the date of the initial compliance test in pounds of mercury per ton of process input using the procedures in paragraphs (a)(12)(i) through (a)(12)(iv) of this section to determine initial compliance with the emission standards in §63.11645. This must include at least 1 full month of data. Or, if a previous test is used pursuant to paragraph (a)(6) of this section for the initial compliance test, use a period of time pursuant to paragraph (a)(6) of this section to calculate the emissions for the affected source. After this initial compliance test period, determine annual compliance using the procedures in paragraph (a)(13) of this section for existing sources.

(i) For ore pretreatment processes, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from all roasting operations and autoclaves during the number of full months between the compliance date and the initial compliance test by the sum of the total amount of gold mine ore processed (in million tons) in these process units during those same full months following the compliance date. Or, if a previous test is used to determine initial compliance, pursuant to paragraph (a)(6) of this section, then the same 3 to 12 full months of production data (i.e., million tons of ore) and hours of operation referred to in paragraph (a)(6) of this section, must be used to determine the emissions in pounds of mercury per million tons of ore.

(ii) For carbon processes with mercury retorts, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from all carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning, mercury retorts, and melt furnaces during the initial number of full months between the compliance date and the initial compliance tests by the total amount of concentrate (in tons) processed in these process units during those same full months following the compliance date. If a previous test is used to determine initial compliance, pursuant to paragraph (a)(6) of this section, then the same 3 to 12 full months of production data (i.e., tons of concentrate) and hours of operation referred to in paragraph (a)(6) of this section, must be used to determine the emissions in pounds of mercury per tons of concentrate.

(iii) For carbon processes without mercury retorts, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from all carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning, and melt furnaces during the initial number of full months between the compliance date and the initial compliance tests by the total amount of concentrate (in tons) processed in these process units during those same full months following the compliance date. If a previous test is used to determine initial compliance, pursuant to paragraph (a)(6) of this section, then the same 3 to 12 full months of production data (i.e., tons of concentrate) and hours of operation referred to in paragraph (a)(6) of this section, must be used to determine the emissions in pounds of mercury per tons of concentrate.

(iv) For non-carbon concentrate processes, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from mercury retorts and melt furnaces during the initial number of full months between the compliance date and the initial compliance tests by the total amount of concentrate (in tons) processed in these process units during those same full months following the compliance date. If a previous test is used to determine initial compliance, pursuant to paragraph (a)(6) of this section, then the same 3 to 12 full months of production data (i.e., tons of concentrate) and hours of operation referred to in paragraph (a)(6) of this section, must be used to determine the emissions in pounds of mercury per tons of concentrate.

(13) After the initial compliance test, calculate the emissions from each new and existing affected source for each 12-month period preceding each subsequent compliance test in pounds of mercury per ton of process input using the procedures in paragraphs (a)(13)(i) through (iv) of this section to determine compliance with the emission standards in §63.11645.

(i) For ore pretreatment processes, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from all roasting operations and autoclaves in the 12-month period preceding a compliance test by the sum of the total amount of gold mine ore processed (in million tons) in that 12-month period.

(ii) For carbon processes with mercury retorts, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from all carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning, mercury retorts, and melt furnaces in the 12-month period preceding a compliance test by the total amount of concentrate (in tons) processed in these process units in that 12-month period.

(iii) For carbon processes without mercury retorts, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from all carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning, and melt furnaces in the 12-month period preceding a compliance test by the total amount of concentrate (in tons) processed in these process units in that 12-month period.

(iv) For non-carbon concentrate processes, divide the sum of mercury mass emissions (in pounds) from mercury retorts and melt furnaces in the 12-month period preceding a compliance test by the total amount of concentrate (in tons) processed in these process units in that 12-month period.

(b) At all times, you must operate and maintain any affected source, including associated air pollution control equipment and monitoring equipment, in a manner consistent with safety and good air pollution control practices for minimizing emissions. Determination of whether such operation and maintenance procedures are being used will be based on information available to the Administrator which may include, but is not limited to, monitoring results, review of operation and maintenance procedures, review of operation and maintenance records, and inspection of the source.

§63.11647   What are my monitoring requirements?

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(5) of this section, you must monitor each roaster for mercury emissions using one of the procedures in paragraphs (a)(1), (a)(2), or (a)(3) of this section and establish operating limits for mercury concentration as described in paragraph (a)(4) of this section.

(1) Perform sampling and analysis of the roaster's exhaust for mercury concentration using EPA Performance Specification 12B (40 CFR part 60, appendix B and Procedure 5 of appendix F) or EPA Method 30B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8) at least twice per month. A minimum of two measurements must be taken per month that are at least 11 days apart from other consecutive tests. The mercury concentration must be maintained below the operating limit established in paragraph (a)(4) of this section. The results of the sampling must be obtained within 72 hours of the time the sample is taken.

(i) To determine the appropriate sampling duration, you must review the available data from previous stack tests to determine the upper 99th percentile of the range of mercury concentrations in the exit stack gas. Based on this upper end of expected concentrations, select an appropriate sampling duration that is likely to provide a valid sample and not result in breakthrough of the sampling tubes. If breakthrough of the sampling tubes occurs, you must re-sample within 7 days using a shorter sampling duration.

(ii) If any mercury concentration measurement from the twice per month sampling with PS 12B or Method 30B is higher than the operating limit, the exceedance must be reported to the permit authority as a deviation and corrective actions must be implemented within 48 hours upon receipt of the sampling results. Moreover, within 96 hours of the exceedance, the owner or operator must measure the concentration again (with PS 12B (40 CFR part 60, appendix B and Procedure 5 of appendix F), Method 30B or Method 29 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8), or ASTM D6784(incorporated by reference—see §63.14)) and demonstrate to the permit authority that the mercury concentration is no higher than the operating limit, or inform the permit authority that the limit continues to be exceeded. If the measured mercury concentration exceeds the operating limit for mercury concentration after these 96 hours, the exceedance must be reported as a deviation within 24 hours to the permitting authority. The owner or operator must conduct a full compliance test pursuant to §63.11646(a) for the roaster operations within 40 days to determine if the affected source is in compliance with the MACT emission standard. For facilities that have roasters and autoclaves, the owner or operator can use the results of the previous compliance test for the autoclaves to determine the emissions for those process units to be used in the calculations of the emissions for the affected source. If the source is determined to be in compliance, the compliance test may also be used to establish a new operating limit for mercury concentration (in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section).

(2) Install, operate, calibrate, and maintain a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) to continuously measure the mercury concentration in the final exhaust stream from each roaster according to the requirements of Performance Specification 12A (40 CFR part 60, appendix B) except that calibration standards traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology are not required. You must perform a data accuracy assessment of the CEMS according to section 5 of Appendix F in part 60 and follow the applicable monitoring requirements in §63.8 as provided in Table 1 to subpart EEEEEEE.

(i) You must continuously monitor the daily average mercury concentration from the roaster and maintain the daily average concentration below the operating limit established in paragraph (a)(4) of this section.

(ii) If the daily average mercury concentration from the CEMs is higher than the operating limit, the exceedance must be reported to the permit authority as a deviation and corrective actions must be implemented within 48 hours upon receipt of the sampling results. Moreover, within 96 hours of the exceedance, the owner or operator must measure the concentration again (with the CEMs (40 CFR part 60, appendix B and Procedure 5 of appendix F) and demonstrate to the permit authority that the mercury concentration is no higher than the operating limit, or inform the permit authority that the limit continues to be exceeded. If the measured mercury concentration exceeds the operating limit for mercury concentration after these 96 hours, the exceedance must be reported as a deviation within 24 hours to the permitting authority, and the owner or operator must conduct a full compliance test pursuant to §63.11646(a) for the roaster operations within 40 days to determine if the affected source is in compliance with the MACT emission standard. For facilities that have roasters and autoclaves, the owner or operator can use the results of the previous compliance test for the autoclaves to determine the emissions for those process units to be used in the calculations of the emissions for the affected source. If the source is determined to be in compliance, the compliance test results may also be used to establish a new operating limit for mercury concentration (in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section).

(iii) You must submit a monitoring plan that includes quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures sufficient to demonstrate the accuracy of the CEMS to your permitting authority for approval 180 days prior to your initial compliance test. At a minimum, the QA/QC procedures must include daily calibrations and an annual accuracy test for the CEMS.

(3) Continuously measure the mercury concentration in the final exhaust stream from each roaster using EPA Performance Specification 12B (40 CFR part 60 appendix B and Procedure 5 of appendix F).

(i) You must continuously measure the mercury concentration in the roaster exhaust and maintain the average daily mercury concentration below the operating limit established in paragraph (a)(4) of this section. To determine the appropriate sampling duration, you must review the available data from previous stack tests to determine the upper 99th percentile of the range of mercury concentrations in the exit stack gas. Based on this upper end of expected concentrations, select an appropriate sampling duration that is likely to provide a valid sample and not result in breakthrough of the sampling tubes. If breakthrough of the sampling tubes occurs, you must re-sample within 7 days using a shorter sampling duration.

(ii) If the daily average mercury concentration is higher than the operating limit, the exceedance must be reported to the permit authority as a deviation and corrective actions must be implemented within 48 hours upon receipt of the sampling results. Moreover, within 96 hours of the exceedance, the owner or operator must measure the concentration again with PS 12B (40 CFR part 60, appendix B and Procedure 5 of appendix F), Method 30B or Method 29 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8), or ASTM D6784(incorporated by reference—see §63.14) and demonstrate to the permit authority that the mercury concentration is no higher than the operating limit, or inform the permit authority that the limit continues to be exceeded. If the measured mercury concentration exceeds the operating limit for mercury concentration after these 96 hours, the exceedance must be reported as a deviation within 24 hours to the permitting authority and the owner or operator must conduct a full compliance test pursuant to §63.11646(a) for the roaster operations within 40 days to determine if the affected source is in compliance with the MACT emission standard. For facilities that have roasters and autoclaves, the owner or operator can use the results of the previous compliance test for the autoclaves to determine the emissions for those process units to be used in the calculations of the emissions for the affected source. If the source is determined to be in compliance, the compliance test results may also be used to establish a new operating limit for mercury concentration (in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section).

(4) Use Equation (2) of this section to establish an upper operating limit for mercury concentration as determined by using the procedures in paragraphs (a)(1), (a)(2), or (a)(3) of this section concurrently while you are conducting your annual compliance performance stack tests according to the procedures in §63.11646(a).

eCFR graphic er17fe11.004.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

OLR = mercury concentration operating limit for the roaster (or roasters that share a common stack) (in micrograms per cubic meter);

Ctest = average mercury concentration measured by the monitoring procedures (PS 12A or PS 12B or 30B) during the compliance performance stack test (in micrograms per cubic meter);

EL = emission standard for ore pretreatment processes (in lb/million tons of ore);

CT = compliance test results for ore pretreatment processes (in lb/million tons of ore).

(5) For roasters that utilize calomel-based mercury control systems for emissions controls, you are not required to perform the monitoring for mercury emissions in paragraphs (a)(1), (a)(2), or (a)(3) of this section if you demonstrate to the satisfaction of your permitting authority that mercury emissions from the roaster are less than 10 pounds of mercury per million tons of ore throughput. If you make this demonstration, you must conduct the parametric monitoring as described below in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.

(i) The initial demonstration must include three or more consecutive independent stack tests for mercury at least one month apart on the roaster exhaust stacks. Subsequent demonstrations may be based upon the single stack test required in paragraph (a) of section §63.11646. The results of each of the tests must be less than 10 pounds of mercury per million tons of ore. The testing must be performed according to the procedures in §63.11646(a)(1) through (a)(4) to determine mercury emissions in pounds per hour.

(ii) Divide the mercury emission rate in pounds per hour by the ore throughput rate during the test expressed in millions of tons per hour to determine the emissions in pounds per million tons of ore.

(b) For facilities with roasters and a calomel-based mercury control system that choose to monitor for mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a)(1) of this section or that qualify for and choose to follow the requirements in paragraph (a)(5) of this section, you must establish operating parameter limits for scrubber liquor flow (or line pressure) and scrubber inlet gas temperature and monitor these parameters. You may establish your operating parameter limits from the initial compliance test, according to the manufacturer's specifications, or based on limits established by the permitting authority. If you choose to establish your operating parameter limits from the initial compliance test, monitor the scrubber liquor flow (or line pressure) and scrubber inlet gas temperature during each run of your initial compliance test. The minimum operating limit for scrubber liquor flow rate (or line pressure) is either the lowest value during any run of the initial compliance test or 10 percent less than the average value measured during the compliance test, and your maximum scrubber inlet temperature limit is the highest temperature measured during any run of the initial compliance test or 10 percent higher than the average value measured during the compliance test. You must monitor the scrubber liquor flow rate (or line pressure) and scrubber inlet gas temperature hourly and maintain the scrubber liquor flow (or line pressure) at or above the established operating parameter and maintain the inlet gas temperature below the established operating parameter limit.

(c) For facilities with roasters and a calomel-based mercury control system that choose to monitor for mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a)(1) of this section or that qualify for and follow the requirements in paragraph (a)(5) of this section, you must establish operating parameter ranges for mercuric ion and chloride ion concentrations or for oxidation reduction potential and pH using the procedures in paragraph (c)(1) or (c)(2) of this section respectively.

(1) Establish the mercuric ion concentration and chloride ion concentration ranges for each calomel-based mercury control system. The mercuric ion concentration and chloride ion concentration ranges for each calomel-based mercury control system must be based on the manufacturer's specifications, or based on approval by your permitting authority. Measure the mercuric ion concentration and chloride ion concentrations at least once during each run of your initial compliance test. The measurements must be within the established concentration range for mercuric ion concentration and chloride ion concentration. Subsequently, you must sample at least once daily and maintain the mercuric ion concentration and chloride ion concentrations within their established range.

(2) Establish the oxidation reduction potential and pH range for each calomel-based mercury control system. The oxidation reduction potential and pH range for each calomel-based mercury control system must be based on the manufacturer's specifications, or based on approval by your permitting authority. Install monitoring equipment to continuously monitor the oxidation reduction potential and pH of the calomel-based mercury control system scrubber liquor. Measure the oxidation reduction potential and pH of the scrubber liquor during each run of your initial compliance test. The measurements must be within the established range for oxidation reduction potential and pH. Subsequently, you must monitor the oxidation reduction potential and pH of the scrubber liquor continuously and maintain it within the established operating range.

(d) If you have an exceedance of a control device operating parameter range provided in paragraphs (b) or (c) of this section, you must take corrective action and bring the parameters back into the established parametric ranges. If the corrective actions taken following an exceedance do not result in the operating parameter value being returned within the established range within 48 hours, a mercury concentration measurement (with PS 12B or PS 12A CEMS (40 CFR part 60, appendix B and Procedure 5 of appendix F), Method 30B or Method 29 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8), or ASTM D6784 (incorporated by reference—see §63.14)) must be made to determine if the operating limit for mercury concentration is being exceeded. The measurement must be performed and the mercury concentration determined within 48 hours (after the initial 48 hours, or a total of 96 hours from the time the parameter range was exceeded). If the measured mercury concentration meets the operating limit for mercury concentration established under §63.11647(a)(4), the corrective actions are deemed successful, and the owner or operator can request the permit authority to establish a new limit or range for the parameter. If the measured mercury concentration exceeds the operating limit for mercury concentration after these 96 hours, the exceedance must be reported as a deviation within 24 hours to the permitting authority and the owner or operator must conduct a full compliance test pursuant to §63.11646(a) for the roaster operations within 40 days to determine if the affected source is in compliance with the MACT emission standard. For facilities that have roasters and autoclaves, the owner or operator can use the results of the previous compliance test for the autoclaves to determine the emissions for those process units to be used in the calculations of the emissions for the affected source. If the source is determined to be in compliance with the MACT emission standard, the compliance test may also be used to establish a new operating limit for mercury concentration (see paragraph (e) of this section).

(e) You may submit a request to your permitting authority for approval to change the operating limits established under paragraph (a)(4) of this section for the monitoring required in paragraph (a)(1),(a)(2), or (a)(3) of this section. In the request, you must demonstrate that the proposed change to the operating limit detects changes in levels of mercury emission control. An approved change to the operating limit under this paragraph only applies until a new operating limit is established during the next annual compliance test.

(f) You must monitor each process unit at each new and existing affected source that uses a carbon adsorber to control mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraphs (f)(1) or (f)(2) of this section. A carbon adsorber may include a fixed carbon bed, carbon filter packs or modules, carbon columns, and other variations.

(1) Continuously sample and analyze the exhaust stream from the carbon adsorber for mercury using Method 30B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8) for a duration of at least the minimum sampling time specified in Method 30B and up to one week that includes the period of the annual performance test.

(i) Establish an upper operating limit for the process as determined using the mercury concentration measurements from the sorbent trap (Method 30B) as calculated from Equation (3) of this section.

eCFR graphic er17fe11.005.gif

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Where:

OLC = mercury concentration operating limit for the carbon adsorber control device on the process as measured using the sorbent trap, (micrograms per cubic meter);

Ctrap = average mercury concentration measured using the sorbent trap during the week that includes the compliance performance test, (micrograms per cubic meter);

EL = emission standard for the affected sources (lb/ton of concentrate);

CT = compliance test results for the affected sources (lb/ton of concentrate).

(ii) Sample and analyze the exhaust stream from the carbon adsorber for mercury at least monthly using Method 30B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8). When the mercury concentration reaches 75 percent of the operating limit, begin weekly sampling and analysis. When the mercury concentration reaches 90 percent of the operating limit, replace the carbon in the carbon adsorber within 30 days. If mercury concentration exceeds the operating limit, change the carbon in the carbon adsorber within 30 days and report the deviation to your permitting authority.

(2) Conduct an initial sampling of the carbon in the carbon bed for mercury 90 days after the replacement of the carbon. A representative sample must be collected from the inlet of the bed and the exit of the bed and analyzed using SW-846 Method 7471B (incorporated by reference—see §63.14). The depth to which the sampler is inserted must be recorded. The design capacity is established by calculating the average carbon loading from the inlet and outlet measurements. Sampling and analysis of the carbon bed for mercury must be performed quarterly thereafter. When the carbon loading reaches 50 percent of the design capacity of the carbon, monthly sampling must be performed until 90 percent of the carbon loading capacity is reached. The carbon must be removed and replaced with fresh carbon no later than 30 days after reaching 90 percent of capacity. For carbon designs where there may be multiple carbon columns or beds, a representative sample may be collected from the first and last column or bed instead of the inlet or outlet. If the carbon loading exceeds the design capacity of the carbon, change the carbon within 30 days and report the deviation to your permitting authority.

(g) You must monitor gas stream temperature at the inlet to the carbon adsorber for each process unit (i.e., carbon kiln, melt furnace, etc.) equipped with a carbon adsorber. Establish a maximum value for the inlet temperature either during the annual performance test (required in §63.11646(a)), according to the manufacturer's specifications, or as approved by your permitting authority. If you choose to establish the temperature operating limit during the performance test, establish the temperature operating limit based on either the highest reading during the test or at 10 °F higher than the average temperature measured during the performance test. Monitor the inlet temperature once per shift. If an inlet temperature exceeds the temperature operating limit, you must take corrective actions to get the temperature back within the parameter operating limit within 48 hours. If the exceedance persists, within 144 hours of the exceedance, you must sample and analyze the exhaust stream from the carbon adsorber using Method 30B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8) and compare to an operating limit (calculated pursuant to (f)(1)(i)) or you must conduct carbon sampling pursuant to (f)(2) of this section. If the concentration measured with Method 30B is below 90 percent of the operating limit or the carbon sampling results are below 90 percent of the carbon loading capacity, you may set a new temperature operating limit 10 °F above the previous operating limit or at an alternative level approved by your permit authority. If the concentration is above 90 percent of the operating limit or above 90 percent of the carbon loading capacity you must change the carbon in the bed within 30 days and report the event to your permitting authority, and reestablish an appropriate maximum temperature limit based on approval of your permit authority.

(h) For each wet scrubber at each new and existing affected source not followed by a mercury control system, you must monitor the water flow rate (or line pressure) and pressure drop. Establish a minimum value as the operating limit for water flow rate (or line pressure) and pressure drop either during the performance test required in §63.11646(a), according to the manufacturer's specifications, or as approved by your permitting authority. If you choose to establish the operating limit based on the results of the performance test, the new operating limit must be established based on either the lowest value during any test run or 10 percent less than the average value measured during the test. For wet scrubbers on an autoclave, establish the pressure drop range according to manufacturer's specifications. You must monitor the water flow rate and pressure drop once per shift and take corrective action within 24 hours if any daily average is less than the operating limit. If the parameters are not in range within 72 hours, the owner or operator must report the deviation to the permitting authority and perform a compliance test for the process unit(s) controlled with the wet scrubber that has the parameter exceedance within 40 days to determine if the affected source is in compliance with the MACT limit. For the other process units included in the affected source, the owner or operator can use the results of the previous compliance test to determine the emissions for those process units to be used in the calculations of the emissions for the affected source.

(i) You may conduct additional compliance tests according to the procedures in §63.11646 and re-establish the operating limits required in paragraphs (a) through (c) and (f) through (h) of this section at any time. You must submit a request to your permitting authority for approval to re-establish the operating limits. In the request, you must demonstrate that the proposed change to the operating limit detects changes in levels of mercury emission control. An approved change to the operating limit under this paragraph only applies until a new operating limit is established during the next annual compliance test.

§63.11648   What are my notification, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements?

(a) You must submit the Initial Notification required by §63.9(b)(2) no later than 120 calendar days after the date of publication of the final rule in the Federal Register or within 120 days after the source becomes subject to the standard. The Initial Notification must include the information specified in §63.9(b)(2)(i) through (b)(2)(iv).

(b) You must submit an initial Notification of Compliance Status as required by §63.9(h).

(c) If a deviation occurs during a semiannual reporting period, you must submit a deviation report to your permitting authority according to the requirements in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) The first reporting period covers the period beginning on the compliance date specified in §63.11641 and ending on June 30 or December 31, whichever date comes first after your compliance date. Each subsequent reporting period covers the semiannual period from January 1 through June 30 or from July 1 through December 31. Your deviation report must be postmarked or delivered no later than July 31 or January 31, whichever date comes first after the end of the semiannual reporting period.

(2) A deviation report must include the information in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) through (c)(2)(iv) of this section.

(i) Company name and address.

(ii) Statement by a responsible official, with the official's name, title, and signature, certifying the truth, accuracy and completeness of the content of the report.

(iii) Date of the report and beginning and ending dates of the reporting period.

(iv) Identification of the affected source, the pollutant being monitored, applicable requirement, description of deviation, and corrective action taken.

(d) If you had a malfunction during the reporting period, the compliance report required in §63.11648(b) must include the number, duration, and a brief description for each type of malfunction which occurred during the reporting period and which caused or may have caused any applicable emission limitation to be exceeded. The report must also include a description of actions taken by an owner or operator during a malfunction of an affected source to minimize emissions in accordance with §63.11646(b), including actions taken to correct a malfunction.

(e) You must keep the records specified in paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(3) of this section. The form and maintenance of records must be consistent with the requirements in section 63.10(b)(1) of the General Provisions.

(1) As required in §63.10(b)(2)(xiv), you must keep a copy of each notification that you submitted to comply with this subpart and all documentation supporting any Initial Notification, Notification of Compliance Status, and semiannual compliance certifications that you submitted.

(2) You must keep the records of all performance tests, measurements, monitoring data, and corrective actions required by §§63.11646 and 63.11647, and the information identified in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) through (c)(2)(vi) of this section for each corrective action required by §63.11647.

(i) The date, place, and time of the monitoring event requiring corrective action;

(ii) Technique or method used for monitoring;

(iv) Operating conditions during the activity;

(v) Results, including the date, time, and duration of the period from the time the monitoring indicated a problem to the time that monitoring indicated proper operation; and

(vi) Maintenance or corrective action taken (if applicable).

(3) You must keep records of operating hours for each process as required by §63.11646(a)(5) and records of the monthly quantity of ore and concentrate processed or produced as required by §63.11646(a)(10).

(f) Your records must be in a form suitable and readily available for expeditious review, according to §63.10(b)(1). As specified in §63.10(b)(1), you must keep each record for 5 years following the date of each recorded action. You must keep each record onsite for at least 2 years after the date of each recorded action according to §63.10(b)(1). You may keep the records offsite for the remaining 3 years.

(g) After December 31, 2011, within 60 days after the date of completing each performance evaluation conducted to demonstrate compliance with this subpart, the owner or operator of the affected facility must submit the test data to EPA by entering the data electronically into EPA's WebFIRE data base through EPA's Central Data Exchange. The owner or operator of an affected facility shall enter the test data into EPA's data base using the Electronic Reporting Tool or other compatible electronic spreadsheet. Only performance evaluation data collected using methods compatible with ERT are subject to this requirement to be submitted electronically into EPA's WebFIRE database.

Other Requirements and Information

§63.11650   What General Provisions apply to this subpart?

Table 1 to this subpart shows which parts of the General Provisions in §§63.1 through 63.16 apply to you.

§63.11651   What definitions apply to this subpart?

Terms used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act, in §63.2, and in this section as follows:

Autoclave means a pressure oxidation vessel that is used to treat gold ores (primarily sulfide refractory ore) and involves pumping a slurry of milled ore into the vessel which is highly pressurized with oxygen and heated to temperatures of approximately 350° to 430 °F.

Calomel-based mercury control system means a mercury emissions control system that uses scrubbers to remove mercury from the gas stream of a roaster or combination of roasters by complexing the mercury from the gas stream with mercuric chloride to form mercurous chloride (calomel). These scrubbers are also referred to as “mercury scrubbers.”

Carbon adsorber means a control device consisting of a single fixed carbon bed, multiple carbon beds or columns, carbon filter packs or modules, and other variations that uses activated carbon to remove pollutants from a gas stream.

Carbon kiln means a kiln or furnace where carbon is regenerated by heating, usually in the presence of steam, after the gold has been stripped from the carbon.

Carbon processes with mercury retorts means the affected source that includes carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning cells, mercury retorts, and melt furnaces at gold mine ore processing and production facilities that use activated carbon, or resins that can be used as a substitute for activated carbon, to recover (adsorb) gold from the pregnant cyanide solution.

Carbon processes without mercury retorts means the affected source that includes carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning cells, and melt furnaces, but has no retorts, at gold mine ore processing and production facilities that use activated carbon, or resins that can be used as a substitute for activated carbon, to recover (adsorb) gold from the pregnant cyanide solution.

Concentrate means the sludge-like material that is loaded with gold along with various other metals (such as silver, copper, and mercury) and various other substances, that is produced by electrowinning, the Merrill-Crowe process, flotation and gravity separation processes. Concentrate is measured as the input to mercury retorts, or for facilities without mercury retorts, as the input to melt furnaces before any drying takes place. For facilities without mercury retorts or melt furnaces, concentrate is measured as the quantity shipped.

Deviation means any instance where an affected source subject to this subpart, or an owner or operator of such a source:

(1) Fails to meet any requirement or obligation established by this subpart, including but not limited to any emissions limitation or work practice standard;

(2) Fails to meet any term or condition that is adopted to implement an applicable requirement in this subpart and that is included in the operating permit for any affected source required to obtain such a permit; or

(3) Exceeds any operating limit established under this subpart.

Electrowinning means a process that uses induced voltage on anode and cathode plates to remove metals from the continuous flow of solution, where the gold in solution is plated onto the cathode. Steel wool is typically used as the plating surface.

Electrowinning Cells means a tank in which the electrowinning takes place.

Gold mine ore processing and production facility means any industrial facility engaged in the processing of gold mine ore that uses any of the following processes: Roasting operations, autoclaves, carbon kilns, preg tanks, electrowinning, mercury retorts, or melt furnaces. Laboratories (see CAA section 112(c)(7)), individual prospectors, and very small pilot scale mining operations that processes or produces less than 100 pounds of concentrate per year are not a gold mine ore processing and production facility. A facility that produces primarily metals other than gold, such as copper, lead, zinc, or nickel (where these metals other than gold comprise 95 percent or more of the total metal production) that may also recover some gold as a byproduct is not a gold mine ore processing and production facility. Those facilities whereby 95 percent or more of total mass of metals produced are metals other than gold, whether final metal production is onsite or offsite, are not part of the gold mine ore processing and production source category.

Melt furnace means a furnace (typically a crucible furnace) that is used for smelting the gold-bearing material recovered from mercury retorting, or the gold-bearing material from electrowinning, the Merrill-Crowe process, or other processes for facilities without mercury retorts.

Mercury retort means a vessel that is operated under a partial vacuum at approximately 1,100° to 1,300 °F to remove mercury and moisture from the gold bearing sludge material that is recovered from electrowinning, the Merrill-Crowe process, or other processes. Mercury retorts are usually equipped with condensers that recover liquid mercury during the processing.

Merrill-Crowe process means a precipitation technique using zinc oxide for removing gold from a cyanide solution. Zinc dust is added to the solution, and gold is precipitated to produce a concentrate.

Non-carbon concentrate processes means the affected source that includes mercury retorts and melt furnaces at gold mine ore processing and production facilities that use the Merrill-Crowe process or other processes and do not use carbon (or resins that substitute for carbon) to recover (adsorb) gold from the pregnant cyanide solution.

Ore dry grinding means a process in which the gold ore is ground and heated (dried) prior to additional preheating or prior to entering the roaster.

Ore preheating means a process in which ground gold ore is preheated prior to entering the roaster.

Ore pretreatment processes means the affected source that includes roasting operations and autoclaves that are used to pre-treat gold mine ore at gold mine ore processing and production facilities prior to the cyanide leaching process.

Pregnant solution tank (or preg tank) means a storage tank for pregnant solution, which is the cyanide solution that contains gold-cyanide complexes that is generated from leaching gold ore with cyanide solution.

Pregnant cyanide solution means the cyanide solution that contains gold-cyanide complexes that are generated from leaching gold ore with a dilute cyanide solution.

Quenching means a process in which the hot calcined ore is cooled and quenched with water after it leaves the roaster.

Roasting operation means a process that uses an industrial furnace in which milled ore is combusted across a fluidized bed to oxidize and remove organic carbon and sulfide mineral grains in refractory gold ore. The emissions points of the roasting operation subject to this subpart include ore dry grinding, ore preheating, the roaster stack, and quenching.

§63.11652   Who implements and enforces this subpart?

(a) This subpart can be implemented and enforced by the U.S. EPA or a delegated authority, such as your state, local, or tribal agency. If the U.S. EPA Administrator has delegated authority to your state, local, or tribal agency, then that agency has the authority to implement and enforce this subpart. You should contact your U.S. EPA Regional Office to find out if this subpart is delegated to your state, local, or tribal agency.

(b) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority of this subpart to a state, local, or tribal agency under 40 CFR part 63, subpart E, the authorities contained in paragraph (c) of this section are retained by the Administrator of the U.S. EPA and are not transferred to the state, local, or tribal agency.

(c) The authorities that will not be delegated to state, local, or tribal agencies are listed in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) Approval of alternatives to the applicability requirements in §63.11640, the compliance date requirements in §63.11641, and the applicable standards in §63.11645.

(2) Approval of an alternative nonopacity emissions standard under §63.6(g).

(3) Approval of a major change to a test method under §63.7(e)(2)(ii) and (f). A “major change to test method” is defined in §63.90(a).

(4) Approval of a major change to monitoring under §63.8(f). A “major change to monitoring” is defined in §63.90(a).

(5) Approval of a waiver of recordkeeping or reporting requirements under §63.10(f), or another major change to recordkeeping/reporting. A “major change to recordkeeping/reporting” is defined in §63.90(a).

§63.11653   [Reserved]

Table 1 to Subpart EEEEEEE of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart EEEEEE

As stated in §63.11650, you must comply with the applicable General Provisions requirements according to the following table

CitationSubjectApplies to
subpart EEEEEEE
Explanation
§63.1(a)(1), (a)(2), (a)(3), (a)(4), (a)(6), (a)(10)-(a)(12), (b)(1), (b)(3), (c)(1), (c)(2), (c)(5), (e)ApplicabilityYes
§63.1(a)(5), (a)(7)-(a)(9), (b)(2), (c)(3), (c)(4), (d)ReservedNo
§63.2DefinitionsYes
§63.3Units and AbbreviationsYes
§63.4Prohibited Activities and CircumventionYes
§63.5Preconstruction Review and Notification RequirementsYes
§63.6(a), (b)(1)-(b)(5), (b)(7), (c)(1), (c)(2), (c)(5), (e)(1)(iii), (f)(2), (f)(3), (g), (i), (j)Compliance with Standards and Maintenance RequirementsYes
§63.6(e)(1)(i) and (ii), (e)(3), and (f)(1)Startup, Shutdown and Malfunction Requirements (SSM)NoSubpart EEEEEEE standards apply at all times.
§63.6(h)(1), (h)(2), (h)(4),(h)(5)(i), (ii), (iii) and (v), (h)(6)-(h)(9)Compliance with Opacity and Visible Emission LimitsNoSubpart EEEEEEE does not contain opacity or visible emission limits.
§63.6(b)(6), (c)(3), (c)(4), (d), (e)(2), (e)(3)(ii), (h)(3), (h)(5)(iv)ReservedNo
§63.7, except (e)(1)Applicability and Performance Test DatesYes
§63.7(e)(1)Performance Testing Requirements Related to SSMNo
§63.8(a)(1), (b)(1), (f)(1)-(5), (g)Monitoring RequirementsYes
§63.8(a)(2), (a)(4), (b)(2)-(3), (c), (d), (e), (f)(6), (g)Continuous Monitoring SystemsYesExcept cross references to SSM requirements in §63.6(e)(1) and (3) do not apply.
§63.8(a)(3)[Reserved]No
§63.9(a), (b)(1), (b)(2)(i)-(v), (b)(4), (b)(5), (c), (d), (e), (g), (h)(1)-(h)(3), (h)(5), (h)(6), (i), (j)Notification RequirementsYes
§63.9(f)No
§63.9(b)(3), (h)(4)ReservedNo
§63.10(a), (b)(1), (b)(2)(vi)-(xiv), (b)(3), (c), (d)(1)-(4), (e), (f)Recordkeeping and Reporting RequirementsYes
§63.10(b)(2)(i)-(v), (d)(5)Recordkeeping/Reporting Associated with SSMNo
§63.10(c)(2)-(c)(4), (c)(9)ReservedNo
§63.11Control Device RequirementsNo
§63.12State Authority and DelegationsYes
§§63.13-63.16Addresses, Incorporation by Reference, Availability of Information, Performance Track ProvisionsYes


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