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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of July 24, 2014

Title 20: Employees' Benefits
PART 404—FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950-      )


Subpart H—Evidence


Contents

General

§404.701   Introduction.
§404.702   Definitions.
§404.703   When evidence is needed.
§404.704   Your responsibility for giving evidence.
§404.705   Failure to give requested evidence.
§404.706   Where to give evidence.
§404.707   Original records or copies as evidence.
§404.708   How we decide what is enough evidence.
§404.709   Preferred evidence and other evidence.

Evidence of Age, Marriage, and Death

§404.715   When evidence of age is needed.
§404.716   Type of evidence of age to be given.
§404.720   Evidence of a person's death.
§404.721   Evidence to presume a person is dead.
§404.722   Rebuttal of a presumption of death.
§404.723   When evidence of marriage is required.
§404.725   Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage.
§404.726   Evidence of common-law marriage.
§404.727   Evidence of a deemed valid marriage.
§404.728   Evidence a marriage has ended.

Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits

§404.730   When evidence of a parent or child relationship is needed.
§404.731   Evidence you are a natural parent or child.
§404.732   Evidence you are a stepparent or stepchild.
§404.733   Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.
§404.734   Evidence you are an equitably adopted child.
§404.735   Evidence you are the grandchild or stepgrandchild.
§404.736   Evidence of a child's dependency.
§404.745   Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.
§404.750   Evidence of a parent's support.

Other Evidence Requirements

§404.760   Evidence of living in the same household with insured person.
§404.762   What is acceptable evidence of having a child in my care?
§404.770   Evidence of where the insured person had a permanent home.
§404.780   Evidence of “good cause” for exceeding time limits on accepting proof of support or application for a lump-sum death payment.

Authority: Secs. 205(a) and 702(a)(5) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 405(a) and 902(a)(5)).

Source: 43 FR 24795, June 7, 1978, unless otherwise noted.

General

§404.701   Introduction.

This subpart contains the Social Security Administration's basic rules about what evidence is needed when a person claims old-age, disability, dependents' and survivors' insurance benefits as described in subpart D. In addition, there are special evidence requirements for disability benefits. These are contained in subpart P. Evidence of a person's earnings under social security is described in subpart I. Evidence needed to obtain a social security number card is described in part 422. Evidence requirements for the supplemental security income program are contained in part 416.

§404.702   Definitions.

As used in this subpart:

Apply means to sign a form or statement that the Social Security Administration accepts as an application for benefits under the rules set out in subpart G.

Benefits means any old-age, disability, dependents' and survivors' insurance benefits described in subpart D, including a period of disability.

Convincing evidence means one or more pieces of evidence that prove you meet a requirement for eligibility. See §404.708 for the guides we use in deciding whether evidence is convincing.

Eligible means that a person would meet all the requirements for entitlement to benefits for a period of time but has not yet applied.

Entitled means that a person has applied and has proven his or her right to benefits for a period of time.

Evidence means any record, document, or signed statement that helps to show whether you are eligible for benefits or whether you are still entitled to benefits.

Insured person means someone who has enough earnings under social security to permit the payment of benefits on his or her earnings record. He or she is fully insured, transitionally insured, currently insured, or insured for disability as defined in subpart B.

We or Us refers to the Social Security Administration.

You refers to the person who has applied for benefits, or the person for whom someone else has applied.

§404.703   When evidence is needed.

When you apply for benefits, we will ask for evidence that you are eligible for them. After you become entitled to benefits, we may ask for evidence showing whether you continue to be entitled to benefits; or evidence showing whether your benefit payments should be reduced or stopped. See §404.401 for a list showing when benefit payments must be reduced or stopped.

§404.704   Your responsibility for giving evidence.

When evidence is needed to prove your eligibility or your right to continue to receive benefit payments, you will be responsible for obtaining and giving the evidence to us. We will be glad to advise you what is needed and how to get it and we will consider any evidence you give us. If your evidence is a foreign-language record or document, we can have it translated for you. Evidence given to us will be kept confidential and not disclosed to anyone but you except under the rules set out in part 401. You should also be aware that Section 208 of the Social Security Act provides criminal penalties for misrepresenting the facts or for making false statements to obtain social security benefits for yourself or someone else.

§404.705   Failure to give requested evidence.

Generally, you will be asked to give us by a certain date specific kinds of evidence or information to prove you are eligible for benefits. If we do not receive the evidence or information by that date, we may decide you are not eligible for benefits. If you are already receiving benefits, you may be asked to give us by a certain date information needed to decide whether you continue to be entitled to benefits or whether your benefits should be stopped or reduced. If you do not give us the requested information by the date given, we may decide that you are no longer entitled to benefits or that your benefits should be stopped or reduced. You should let us know if you are unable to give us the requested evidence within the specified time and explain why there will be a delay. If this delay is due to illness, failure to receive timely evidence you have asked for from another source, or a similar circumstance, you will be given additional time to give us the evidence.

§404.706   Where to give evidence.

Evidence should be given to the people at a Social Security Administration office. In the Philippines evidence should be given to the people at the Veterans Administration Regional Office. Elsewhere outside the United States, evidence should be given to the people at a United States Foreign Service Office.

§404.707   Original records or copies as evidence.

(a) General. To prove your eligibility or continuing entitlement to benefits, you may be asked to show us an original document or record. These original records or documents will be returned to you after we have photocopied them. We will also accept copies of original records that are properly certified and some uncertified birth notifications. These types of records are described below in this section.

(b) Certified copies of original records. You may give us copies of original records or extracts from records if they are certified as true and exact copies by—

(1) The official custodian of the record;

(2) A Social Security Administration employee authorized to certify copies;

(3) A Veterans Administration employee if the evidence was given to that agency to obtain veteran's benefits;

(4) A U.S. Consular Officer or employee of the Department of State authorized to certify evidence received outside the United States; or

(5) An employee of a State Agency or State Welfare Office authorized to certify copies of original records in the agency's or office's files.

(c) Uncertified copies of original records. You may give us an uncertified photocopy of a birth registration notification as evidence where it is the practice of the local birth registrar to issue them in this way.

§404.708   How we decide what is enough evidence.

When you give us evidence, we examine it to see if it is convincing evidence. If it is, no other evidence is needed. In deciding if evidence is convincing, we consider whether—

(a) Information contained in the evidence was given by a person in a position to know the facts;

(b) There was any reason to give false information when the evidence was created;

(c) Information contained in the evidence was given under oath, or with witnesses present, or with the knowledge there was a penalty for giving false information;

(d) The evidence was created at the time the event took place or shortly thereafter;

(e) The evidence has been altered or has any erasures on it; and

(f) Information contained in the evidence agrees with other available evidence, including our records.

§404.709   Preferred evidence and other evidence.

If you give us the type of evidence we have shown as preferred in the following sections of this subpart, we will generally find it is convincing evidence. This means that unless we have information in our records that raises a doubt about the evidence, other evidence of the same fact will not be needed. If preferred evidence is not available, we will consider any other evidence you give us. If this other evidence is several different records or documents which all show the same information, we may decide it is convincing evidence even though it is not preferred evidence. If the other evidence is not convincing by itself, we will ask for additional evidence. If this additional evidence shows the same information, all the evidence considered together may be convincing. When we have convincing evidence of the facts that must be proven or it is clear that the evidence provided does not prove the necessary facts, we will make a formal decision about your benefit rights.

Evidence of Age, Marriage, and Death

§404.715   When evidence of age is needed.

(a) If you apply for benefits, we will ask for evidence of age which shows your date of birth unless you are applying for—

(1) A lump-sum death payment;

(2) A wife's benefit and you have the insured person's child in your care;

(3) A mother's or father's benefit; or

(4) A disability benefit (or for a period of disability) and neither your eligibility nor benefit amount depends upon your age.

(b) If you apply for wife's benefits while under age 62 or if you apply for a mother's or father's benefit, you will be asked for evidence of the date of birth of the insured person's children in your care.

(c) If you apply for benefits on the earnings record of a deceased person, you may be asked for evidence of his or her age if this is needed to decide whether he or she was insured at the time of death or what benefit amount is payable to you.

§404.716   Type of evidence of age to be given.

(a) Preferred evidence. The best evidence of your age, if you can obtain it, is either: a birth certificate or hospital birth record recorded before age 5; or a religious record which shows your date of birth and was recorded before age 5.

(b) Other evidence of age. If you cannot obtain the preferred evidence of your age, you will be asked for other convincing evidence that shows your date of birth or age at a certain time such as: an original family bible or family record; school records; census records; a statement signed by the physician or midwife who was present at your birth; insurance policies; a marriage record; a passport; an employment record; a delayed birth certificate, your child's birth certificate; or an immigration or naturalization record.

§404.720   Evidence of a person's death.

(a) When evidence of death is required. If you apply for benefits on the record of a deceased person, we will ask for evidence of the date and place of his or her death. We may also ask for evidence of another person's death if this is needed to prove you are eligible for benefits.

(b) Preferred evidence of death. The best evidence of a person's death is—

(1) A certified copy or extract from the public record of death, coroner's report of death, or verdict of a coroner's jury; or a certificate by the custodian of the public record of death;

(2) A statement of the funeral director, attending physician, intern of the institution where death occurred;

(3) A certified copy of, or extract from an official report or finding of death made by an agency or department of the United States; or

(4) If death occurred outside the United States, an official report of death by a United States Consul or other employee of the State Department; or a copy of the public record of death in the foreign country.

(c) Other evidence of death. If you cannot obtain the preferred evidence of a person's death, you will be asked to explain why and to give us other convincing evidence such as: the signed statements of two or more people with personal knowledge of the death, giving the place, date, and cause of death.

§404.721   Evidence to presume a person is dead.

If you cannot prove the person is dead but evidence of death is needed, we will presume he or she died at a certain time if you give us the following evidence:

(a) A certified copy of, or extract from, an official report or finding by an agency or department of the United States that a missing person is presumed to be dead as set out in Federal law (5 U.S.C. 5565). Unless we have other evidence showing an actual date of death, we will use the date he or she was reported missing as the date of death.

(b) Signed statements by those in a position to know and other records which show that the person has been absent from his or her residence and has not been heard from for at least 7 years. If the presumption of death is not rebutted pursuant to §404.722, we will use as the person's date of death either the date he or she left home, the date ending the 7 year period, or some other date depending upon what the evidence shows is the most likely date of death.

(c) If you are applying for benefits as the insured person's grandchild or stepgrandchild but the evidence does not identify a parent, we will presume the parent died in the first month in which the insured person became entitled to benefits.

[43 FR 24795, June 7, 1978, as amended at 60 FR 19164, Apr. 17, 1995]

§404.722   Rebuttal of a presumption of death.

A presumption of death made based on §404.721(b) can be rebutted by evidence that establishes that the person is still alive or explains the individual's absence in a manner consistent with continued life rather than death.

Example 1: Evidence in a claim for surviving child's benefits showed that the worker had wages posted to his earnings record in the year following the disappearance. It was established that the wages belonged to the worker and were for work done after his “disappearance.” In this situation, the presumption of death is rebutted by evidence (wages belonging to the worker) that the person is still alive after the disappearance.

Example 2: Evidence shows that the worker left the family home shortly after a woman, whom he had been seeing, also disappeared, and that the worker phoned his wife several days after the disappearance to state he intended to begin a new life in California. In this situation the presumption of death is rebutted because the evidence explains the worker's absence in a manner consistent with continued life.

[60 FR 19165, Apr. 17, 1995]

§404.723   When evidence of marriage is required.

If you apply for benefits as the insured person's husband or wife, widow or widower, divorced wife or divorced husband, we will ask for evidence of the marriage and where and when it took place. We may also ask for this evidence if you apply for child's benefits or for the lump-sum death payment as the widow or widower. If you are a widow, widower, or divorced wife who remarried after your marriage to the insured person ended, we may also ask for evidence of the remarriage. You may be asked for evidence of someone else's marriage if this is necessary to prove your marriage to the insured person was valid. In deciding whether the marriage to the insured person is valid or not, we will follow the law of the State where the insured person had his or her permanent home when you applied or, if earlier, when he or she died—see §404.770. What evidence we will ask for depends upon whether the insured person's marriage was a ceremonial marriage, a common-law marriage, or a marriage we will deem to be valid.

[43 FR 24795, June 7, 1978, as amended at 44 FR 34493, June 15, 1979]

§404.725   Evidence of a valid ceremonial marriage.

(a) General. A valid ceremonial marriage is one that follows procedures set by law in the State or foreign country where it takes place. These procedures cover who may perform the marriage ceremony, what licenses or witnesses are needed, and similar rules. A ceremonial marriage can be one that follows certain tribal Indian custom, Chinese custom, or similar traditional procedures. We will ask for the evidence described in this section.

(b) Preferred evidence. Preferred evidence of a ceremonial marriage is—

(1) If you are applying for wife's or husband's benefits, signed statements from you and the insured about when and where the marriage took place. If you are applying for the lump-sum death payment as the widow or widower, your signed statement about when and where the marriage took place; or

(2) If you are applying for any other benefits or there is evidence causing some doubt about whether there was a ceremonial marriage: a copy of the public record of marriage or a certified statement as to the marriage; a copy of the religious record of marriage or a certified statement as to what the record shows; or the original marriage certificate.

(c) Other evidence of a ceremonial marriage. If preferred evidence of a ceremonial marriage cannot be obtained, we will ask you to explain why and to give us a signed statement of the clergyman or official who held the marriage ceremony, or other convincing evidence of the marriage.

§404.726   Evidence of common-law marriage.

(a) General. A common-law marriage is one considered valid under certain State laws even though there was no formal ceremony. It is a marriage between two persons free to marry, who consider themselves married, live together as man and wife, and, in some States, meet certain other requirements. We will ask for the evidence described in this section.

(b) Preferred evidence. Preferred evidence of a common-law marriage is—

(1) If both the husband and wife are alive, their signed statements and those of two blood relatives;

(2) If either the husband or wife is dead, the signed statements of the one who is alive and those of two blood relatives of the deceased person; or

(3) If both the husband and wife are dead, the signed statements of one blood relative of each;

Note: All signed statements should show why the signer believes there was a marriage between the two persons. If a written statement cannot be gotten from a blood relative, one from another person can be used instead.

(c) Other evidence of common-law marriage. If you cannot get preferred evidence of a common-law marriage, we will ask you to explain why and to give us other convincing evidence of the marriage. We may not ask you for statements from a blood relative or other person if we believe other evidence presented to us proves the common-law marriage.

§404.727   Evidence of a deemed valid marriage.

(a) General. A deemed valid marriage is a ceremonial marriage we consider valid even though the correct procedures set by State law were not strictly followed or a former marriage had not yet ended. We will ask for the evidence described in this section.

(b) Preferred evidence. Preferred evidence of a deemed valid marriage is—

(1) Evidence of the ceremonial marriage as described in §404.725(b)(2);

(2) If the insured person is alive, his or her signed statement that the other party to the marriage went through the ceremony in good faith and his or her reasons for believing the marriage was valid or believing the other party thought it was valid;

(3) The other party's signed statement that he or she went through the marriage ceremony in good faith and his or her reasons for believing it was valid;

(4) If needed to remove a reasonable doubt, the signed statements of others who might have information about what the other party knew about any previous marriage or other facts showing whether he or she went through the marriage in good faith; and

(5) Evidence the parties to the marriage were living in the same household when you applied for benefits or, if earlier, when the insured person died (see §404.760).

(c) Other evidence of a deemed valid marriage. If you cannot obtain preferred evidence of a deemed valid marriage, we will ask you to explain why and to give us other convincing evidence of the marriage.

§404.728   Evidence a marriage has ended.

(a) When evidence is needed that a marriage has ended. If you apply for benefits as the insured person's divorced wife or divorced husband, you will be asked for evidence of your divorce. If you are the insured person's widow or divorced wife who had remarried but that husband died, we will ask you for evidence of his death. We may ask for evidence that a previous marriage you or the insured person had was ended before you married each other if this is needed to show the latter marriage was valid. If you apply for benefits as an unmarried person and you had a marriage which was annulled, we will ask for evidence of the annulment. We will ask for the evidence described in this section.

(b) Preferred evidence. Preferred evidence a marriage has ended is—

(1) A certified copy of the decree of divorce or annulment; or

(2) Evidence the person you married has died (see §404.720).

(c) Other evidence a marriage has ended. If you cannot obtain preferred evidence the marriage has ended, we will ask you to explain why and to give us other convincing evidence the marriage has ended.

[43 FR 24795, June 7, 1978, as amended at 44 FR 34493, June 15, 1979]

Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits

§404.730   When evidence of a parent or child relationship is needed.

If you apply for parent's or child's benefits, we will ask for evidence showing your relationship to the insured person. What evidence we will ask for depends on whether you are the insured person's natural parent or child; or whether you are the stepparent, stepchild, grandchild, stepgrandchild, adopting parent or adopted child.

§404.731   Evidence you are a natural parent or child.

If you are the natural parent of the insured person, we will ask for a copy of his or her public or religious birth record made before age 5. If you are the natural child of the insured person, we will ask for a copy of your public or religious birth record made before age 5. In either case, if this record shows the same last name for the insured and the parent or child, we will accept it as convincing evidence of the relationship. However, if other evidence raises some doubt about this record or if the record cannot be gotten, we will ask for other evidence of the relationship. We may also ask for evidence of marriage of the insured person or of his or her parent if this is needed to remove any reasonable doubt about the relationship. To show you are the child of the insured person, you may be asked for evidence you would be able to inherit his or her personal property under State law where he or she had a permanent home (see §404.770). In addition, we may ask for the insured persons signed statement that you are his or her natural child, or for a copy of any court order showing the insured has been declared to be your natural parent or any court order requiring the insured to contribute to you support because you are his or her son or daughter.

§404.732   Evidence you are a stepparent or stepchild.

If you are the stepparent or stepchild of the insured person, we will ask for the evidence described in §404.731 or §404.733 that which shows your natural or adoptive relationship to the insured person's husband, wife, widow, or widower. We will also ask for evidence of the husband's, wife's, widow's, or widower's marriage to the insured person—see §404.725.

§404.733   Evidence you are the legally adopting parent or legally adopted child.

If you are the adopting parent or adopted child, we will ask for the following evidence:

(a) A copy of the birth certificate made following the adoption; or if this cannot be gotten, other evidence of the adoption; and, if needed, evidence of the date of adoption;

(b) If the widow or widower adopted the child after the insured person died, the evidence described in paragraph (a) of this section; your written statement whether the insured person was living in the same household with the child when he or she died (see §404.760); what support the child was getting from any other person or organization; and if the widow or widower had a deemed valid marriage with the insured person, evidence of that marriage—see §404.727;

(c) If you are the insured's stepchild, grandchild, or stepgrandchild as well as his or her adopted child, we may also ask you for evidence to show how you were related to the insured before the adoption.

§404.734   Evidence you are an equitably adopted child.

In many States, the law will treat someone as a child of another if he or she agreed to adopt the child, the natural parents or the person caring for the child were parties to the agreement, he or she and the child then lived together as parent and child, and certain other requirements are met. If you are a child who had this kind or relationship to the insured person (or to the insured persons's wife, widow, or husband), we will ask for evidence of the agreement if it is in writing. If it is not in writing or cannot be gotten, other evidence may be accepted. Also, the following evidence will be asked for: Written statements of your natural parents and the adopting parents and other evidence of the child's relationship to the adopting parents.

§404.735   Evidence you are the grandchild or stepgrandchild.

If you are the grandchild or stepgrandchild of the insured person, we will ask you for the kind of evidence described in §§404.731 through 404.733 that shows your relationship to your parent and your parent's relationship to the insured.

§404.736   Evidence of a child's dependency.

(a) When evidence of a child's dependency is needed. If you apply for child's benefit's we may ask for evidence you were the insured person's dependent at a specific time—usually the time you applied or the time the insured died or became disabled. What evidence we ask for depends upon how you are related to the insured person.

(b) Natural or adopted child. If you are the insured person's natural or adopted child, we may ask for the following evidence:

(1) A signed statement by someone who knows the facts that confirms this relationship and which shows whether you were legally adopted by someone other than the insured. If you were adopted by someone else while the insured person was alive, but the adoption was annulled, we may ask for a certified copy of the annulment decree or other convincing evidence of the annulment.

(2) A signed statement by someone in a position to know showing when and where you lived with the insured and when and why you may have lived apart; and showing what contributions the insured made to your support and when and how they were made.

(c) Stepchild. If you are the insured person's stepchild, we will ask for the following evidence:

(1) A signed statement by someone in a position to know—showing when and where you lived with the insured and when and why you may have lived apart.

(2) A signed statement by someone in a position to know showing you received at least one-half of your support from the insured for the one-year period ending at one of the times mentioned in paragraph (a) of this section; and the income end support you had in this period from any other source.

(d) Grandchild or Stepgrandchild. If you are the insured person's grandchild or stepgrandchild, we will ask for evidence described in paragraph (c) of this section showing that you were living together with the insured and receiving one-half of your support from him or her for the year before the insured became entitled to benefits or to a period of disability, or died. We will also ask for evidence of your parent's death or disability.

§404.745   Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

If you apply for child's benefits as a student age 18 or over, we may ask for evidence you are attending school. We may also ask for evidence from the school you attend showing your status at the school. We will ask for the following evidence:

(a) Your signed statement that you are attending school full-time and are not being paid by an employer to attend school.

(b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high school, a letter of acceptance from the school, receipted bill, or other evidence showing you have enrolled or been accepted at that school.

§404.750   Evidence of a parent's support.

If you apply for parent's benefits, we will ask you for evidence to show that you received at least one-half of your support from the insured person in the one-year period before he or she died or became disabled. We may also ask others who know the facts for a signed statement about your sources of support. We will ask you for the following evidence:

(a) The parent's signed statement showing his or her income, any other sources of support, and the amount from each source over the one-year period.

(b) If the statement described in paragraph (a) of this section cannot be obtained, other convincing evidence that the parent received one-half of his or her support from the insured person.

Other Evidence Requirements

§404.760   Evidence of living in the same household with insured person.

If you apply for the lump-sum death payment as the insured person's widow or widower, or for wife's, husband's, widow's, or widower's benefits based upon a deemed valid marriage as described in §404.727, we will ask for evidence you and the insured were living together in the same household when he or she died; or if the insured is alive, when you applied for benefits. We will ask for the following as evidence of this:

(a) If the insured person is living, his or her signed statement and yours showing whether you were living together when you applied for benefits.

(b) If the insured person is dead, your signed statement showing whether you were living together when he or she died.

(c) If you and the insured person were temporarily living apart, a signed statement explaining where each was living, how long the separation lasted, and why you were separated. If needed to remove any reasonable doubts about this, we may ask for the signed statements of others in a position to know, or for other convincing evidence you and the insured were living together in the same household.

§404.762   What is acceptable evidence of having a child in my care?

What evidence we will ask for depends upon whether the child is living with you or with someone else. You will be asked to give the following evidence:

(a) If the child is living with you, your signed statement showing that the child is living with you.

(b) If the child is living with someone else—

(1) Your signed statement showing with whom he or she is living and why he or she is living with someone else. We will also ask when he or she last lived with you and how long this separation will last, and what care and contributions you provide for the child;

(2) The signed statement of the one with whom the child is living showing what care you provide and the sources and amounts of support received for the child. If the child is in an institution, an official there should sign the statement. These statements are preferred evidence. If there is a court order or written agreement showing who has custody of the child, you may be asked to give us a copy; and

(3) If you cannot get the preferred evidence described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, we will ask for other convincing evidence that the child is in your care.

[43 FR 24795, June 7, 1978, as amended at 73 FR 40967, July 17, 2008]

§404.770   Evidence of where the insured person had a permanent home.

(a) When evidence of the insured's permanent home is needed. We may ask for evidence of where the insured person's permanent home was at the time you applied or, if earlier, the time he or she died if—

(1) You apply for benefits as the insured's wife, husband, widow, widower, parent or child; and

(2) Your relationship to the insured depends upon the State law that would be followed in the place where the insured had his or her permanent home when you applied for benefits or when he or she died.

(b) What evidence is needed. We will ask for the following evidence of the insured person's permanent home:

(1) Your signed statement showing where the insured considered his permanent home to be.

(2) If the statement in paragraph (b)(1) of this section or other evidence we have raises a reasonable doubt about where the insured's permanent home was, evidence of where he or she paid personal, property, or income taxes, or voted; or other convincing evidence of where his or her permanent home was.

§404.780   Evidence of “good cause” for exceeding time limits on accepting proof of support or application for a lump-sum death payment.

(a) When evidence of good cause is needed. We may ask for evidence that you had good cause (as defined in §404.370(f)) for not giving us sooner proof of the support you received from the insured as his or her parent. We may also ask for evidence that you had good cause (as defined in §404.621(b)) for not applying sooner for the lump-sum death payment. You may be asked for evidence of good cause for these delays if—

(1) You are the insured person's parent giving us proof of support more than 2 years after he or she died, or became disabled; or

(2) You are applying for the lump-sum death payment more than 2 years after the insured died.

(b) What evidence of good cause is needed. We will ask for the following evidence of good cause:

(1) Your signed statement explaining why you did not give us the proof of support or the application for lump-sum death payment within the specified 2 year period.

(2) If the statement in paragraph (b)(1) of the section or other evidence raises a reasonable doubt whether there was good cause, other convincing evidence of this.

[43 FR 24795, June 7, 1978, as amended at 44 FR 34493, June 15, 1979]



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