About GPO   |   Newsroom/Media   |   Congressional Relations   |   Inspector General   |   Careers   |   Contact   |   askGPO   |   Help  
 
Home   |   Customers   |   Vendors   |   Libraries  

The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) is a regularly updated, unofficial editorial compilation of CFR material and Federal Register amendments produced by the National Archives and Records Administration's Office of the Federal Register (OFR) and the Government Printing Office.

Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules for the Code of Federal Regulations and the United States Code
Text | PDF

Find, review, and submit comments on Federal rules that are open for comment and published in the Federal Register using Regulations.gov.

Purchase individual CFR titles from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore.

Find issues of the CFR (including issues prior to 1996) at a local Federal depository library.

[2]
 
 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 41: Public Contracts and Property Management


PART 301-10—TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES


Contents

Subpart A—General

§301-10.1   Am I eligible for payment of transportation expenses?
§301-10.2   What expenses are payable as transportation?
§301-10.3   What methods of transportation may my agency authorize me to use?
§301-10.4   How does my agency select the method of transportation to be used?
§301-10.5   What are the presumptions as to the most advantageous method of transportation?
§301-10.6   What is my liability if I do not travel by the authorized method of transportation?
§301-10.7   How should I route my travel?
§301-10.8   What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route?

Subpart B—Common Carrier Transportation

§301-10.100   What types of common carrier transportation may I be authorized to use?
§301-10.105   What are the basic requirements for using common carrier transportation?

Use of Contract City-Pair Fares

§301-10.106   When must I use a contract city-pair fare?
§301-10.107   Are there any exceptions to the use of a contract city-pair fare?
§301-10.108   What requirements must be met to use a non-contract fare?
§301-10.109   What is my liability for unauthorized use of a non-contract carrier when contract service is available and I do not meet one of the exceptions for required use?
§301-10.110   May I use contract passenger transportation service for personal travel?
§301-10.111   When may I use a reduced group or charter fare?
§301-10.112   What must I do when different airlines furnish the same service at different fares?
§301-10.113   What must I do if I change or do not use a common carrier reservation?
§301-10.114   What must I do with unused Government Transportation Request(s) (GTR(s)), ticket(s) or refund application(s)?
§301-10.115   Am I authorized to receive a refund or credit for unused transportation?
§301-10.116   What must I do with compensation an airline gives me if it denies me a seat on a plane?
§301-10.117   May I keep compensation an airline gives me for voluntarily vacating my seat on my scheduled airline flight when the airline asks for volunteers?

Airline Accommodations

§301-10.121   What classes of airline accommodations are available?
§301-10.122   What class of airline accommodations must I use?
§301-10.123   When may I use other than coach-class airline accommodations?
§301-10.124   What are coach-class Seating Upgrade Programs?
§301-10.125   When may I use the 14-hour rule to travel other than coach-class (see §301-10.123(b)(6))?

Use of United States Flag Air Carriers

§301-10.131   What does United States mean?
§301-10.132   Who is required to use a U.S. flag air carrier?
§301-10.133   What is a U.S. flag air carrier?
§301-10.134   What is U.S. flag air carrier service?
§301-10.135   When must I travel using U.S. flag air carrier service?
§301-10.136   What exceptions to the Fly America Act requirements apply when I travel between the United States and another country?
§301-10.137   What exceptions to the Fly America Act requirements apply when I travel solely outside the United States, and a U.S. flag air carrier provides service between my origin and my destination?
§301-10.138   In what circumstances is foreign air carrier service deemed a matter of necessity?
§301-10.139   May I travel by a foreign air carrier if the cost of my ticket is less than traveling by a U.S. flag air carrier?
§301-10.140   May I use a foreign air carrier if the service is preferred by or more convenient for my agency or me?
§301-10.141   Must I provide any special certification or documents if I use a foreign air carrier?
§301-10.142   What must the certification include?
§301-10.143   What is my liability if I improperly use a foreign air carrier?

Train

§301-10.160   What classes of train accommodations are available?
§301-10.161   What class of train accommodations must I use?
§301-10.162   When may I use other than coach-class train accommodations?
§301-10.163   What is an extra-fare train?
§301-10.164   When may I use extra-fare train service?

Ship

§301-10.180   Must I travel by a U.S. flag ship?
§301-10.181   What is my liability if I improperly use a foreign ship?
§301-10.182   What classes of ship accommodations are available?
§301-10.183   What class of ship accommodations must I use?

Transit Systems

§301-10.190   When may I use a transit system as a means of transportation in conjunction with official travel?

Subpart C—Government Vehicle

§301-10.200   What types of Government vehicles may my agency authorize me to use?
§301-10.201   For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?
§301-10.202   What is my liability for unauthorized use of a Government vehicle?

Government Automobiles

§301-10.220   What requirements must I meet to operate a Government automobile for official travel?

Travel on Government Aircraft

§301-10.260   May I use a Government aircraft for travel?
§301-10.261   When may I use a Government aircraft for travel?
§301-10.262   How will my agency authorize travel on Government aircraft?
§301-10.263   What travel authorization documents must I present to the aircraft management office that operates the Government aircraft?
§301-10.264   What amount must the Government be reimbursed for travel on Government aircraft?
§301-10.265   Will my travel on Government aircraft be reported?
§301-10.266   Is information available to the public about travel on Government aircraft by senior Federal officials and non-Federal travelers?

Subpart D—Privately Owned Vehicle (POV)

§301-10.300   When may I use a POV for official travel?
§301-10.301   How do I compute my mileage reimbursement?
§301-10.302   How do I determine distance measurements for my travel?
§301-10.303   What am I reimbursed when use of POV is determined by my agency to be advantageous to the Government?
§301-10.304   What expenses are allowable in addition to the POV mileage rate allowances?
§301-10.305   How is reimbursement handled if another person(s) travels in a POV with me?
§301-10.306   What will I be reimbursed if authorized to use a POV between my residence and office and then from my office to a common carrier terminal, or from my residence directly to a common carrier terminal?
§301-10.307   What will I be reimbursed if I use a POV to transport other employees?
§301-10.308   What will I be reimbursed if I park my POV at a common carrier terminal while I am away from my official station?
§301-10.309   What will I be reimbursed if I am authorized to use common carrier transportation and I use a POV instead?
§301-10.310   What will I be reimbursed if I am authorized to use a Government owned automobile and I use a privately owned automobile instead?

Subpart E—Special Conveyances

§301-10.400   What types of special conveyances may my agency authorize me to use?
§301-10.401   What types of charges are reimbursable for use of a special conveyance?
§301-10.402   What will I be reimbursed if I am authorized to use a special conveyance and I use a POV instead?
§301-10.403   What is the difference between a Government aircraft and an aircraft hired as a special conveyance?

Taxicabs, Shuttle Services, or Other Courtesy Transportation

§301-10.420   When may I use a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation?
§301-10.421   How much will my agency reimburse me for a tip to a taxi, shuttle service, courtesy transportation driver, or valet parking attendant?

Rental Automobiles

§301-10.450   When and from whom may I rent a vehicle for official travel when authorized?
§301-10.451   May I be reimbursed for the cost of collision damage waiver (CDW) or theft insurance?
§301-10.452   May I be reimbursed for personal accident insurance?
§301-10.453   What is my liability for unauthorized use of a rental automobile obtained with Government funds?

Authority: 5 U.S.C. 5707, 40 U.S.C. 121(c); 49 U.S.C. 40118; OMB Circular No. A-126, revised May 22, 1992.

Source: FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General

§301-10.1   Am I eligible for payment of transportation expenses?

Yes, you are eligible for payment of transportation expenses when performing official travel, including authorized transportation expenses incurred within the TDY location.

[FTR Amdt. 2010-02, 75 FR 24435, May 5, 2010]

§301-10.2   What expenses are payable as transportation?

Fares, rental fees, mileage payments, and other expenses related to transportation.

§301-10.3   What methods of transportation may my agency authorize me to use?

Your agency may authorize:

(a) Common carrier transportation (e.g., aircraft, train, bus, ship, or other transit system) under Subpart B;

(b) Government vehicle under Subpart C;

(c) POV under Subpart D; or

(d) Special conveyance (e.g., taxi or commercial automobile) under Subpart E.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-02, 75 FR 24435, May 5, 2010]

§301-10.4   How does my agency select the method of transportation to be used?

Your agency must select the method most advantageous to the Government, when cost and other factors are considered. Under 5 U.S.C. 5733, travel must be by the most expeditious means of transportation practicable and commensurate with the nature and purpose of your duties. In addition, your agency must consider energy conservation, total cost to the Government (including costs of per diem, overtime, lost worktime, and actual transportation costs), total distance traveled, number of points visited, and number of travelers.

§301-10.5   What are the presumptions as to the most advantageous method of transportation?

(a) Common carrier. Travel by common carrier is presumed to be the most advantageous method of transportation and must be used when reasonably available.

(b) Government automobile. When your agency determines that your travel must be performed by automobile, a Government automobile is presumed to be the most advantageous method of transportation.

§301-10.6   What is my liability if I do not travel by the authorized method of transportation?

If you do not travel by the method of transportation required by regulation or authorized by your agency, any additional expenses you incur which exceed the cost of the authorized method of transportation will be borne by you.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-07, 75 FR 72967, Nov. 29, 2010]

§301-10.7   How should I route my travel?

You must travel to your destination by the usually traveled route unless your agency authorizes or approves a different route as officially necessary.

§301-10.8   What is my liability if, for personal convenience, I travel by an indirect route or interrupt travel by a direct route?

Your reimbursement will be limited to the cost of travel by a direct route or on an uninterrupted basis. You will be responsible for any additional costs.

Subpart B—Common Carrier Transportation

§301-10.100   What types of common carrier transportation may I be authorized to use?

You may be authorized to use airline, train, ship, bus, or other transit system.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-02, 75 FR 24435, May 5, 2010]

§301-10.105   What are the basic requirements for using common carrier transportation?

The basic requirements for using common carrier transportation fall into three categories:

(a) Using contract carriers, when available, and if your agency is a mandatory user of GSA's city-pair contracts for air passenger transportation services, unless you have an approved exception (see §§301-10.106 through 301-10.108 of this subpart);

(b) Using coach-class service, unless other than coach-class service is authorized under §301-10.123 or §301-10.162, and when travelling by ship, using lowest first-class accommodations, unless other than lowest first-class accommodations are authorized under §301-10.183 of this subpart; and

(c) You must always use U.S. Flag Air Carrier (or ship) service for air passenger transportation or when travelling by ship, unless your travel circumstances meet one of the exceptions in §§301-10.135 through 301-10.138 or §301-10.183 of this subpart.

[FTR Amdt. 2010-05, 75 FR 63103, Oct. 14, 2010]

Use of Contract City-Pair Fares

§301-10.106   When must I use a contract city-pair fare?

If you are a civilian employee of an agency as defined in §301-1.1 of this chapter, you must always use a contract city-pair fare for scheduled air passenger transportation service unless one of the limited exceptions in §301-10.107 exist. An Internet listing of contract city-pair fares is available at http://www.gsa.gov/citypairs.

Note to §301-10.106: Employees of the Government of the District of Columbia, with the exception of the District of Columbia Courts, are not eligible to use contract city-pair fares even though these employees otherwise may be covered by the FTR.

[FTR Amdt. 2006-04, 71 FR 49374, Aug. 23, 2006]

§301-10.107   Are there any exceptions to the use of a contract city-pair fare?

Yes, your agency may authorize use of a fare other-than a contract city-pair fare when—

(a) Space on a scheduled contract flight is not available in time to accomplish the purpose of your travel, or use of contract service would require you to incur unnecessary overnight lodging costs which would increase the total cost of the trip;

(b) The contractor's flight schedule is inconsistent with explicit policies of your Federal department or agency with regard to scheduling travel during normal working hours;

(c) A non-contract carrier offers a lower fare to the general public that, if used, will result in a lower total trip cost to the Government (the combined costs of transportation, lodging, meals, and related expenses considered);

Note to paragraph (c): This exception does not apply if the contract carrier offers the same or lower fare and has seats available at that fare, or if the fare offered by the non-contract carrier is restricted to Government and military travelers performing official business and may be purchased only with a contractor-issued charge card, centrally billed account (e.g., YDG, MDG, QDG, VDG, and similar fares) or GTR where the two previous options are not available;

(d) Cost effective rail service is available and is consistent with mission requirements; or

(e) Smoking is permitted on the contract air carrier and the nonsmoking section of the contract aircraft is not acceptable to you.

Note 1 to §301-10.107: Any group of 10 or more passengers traveling together on the same day, on the same flight, for the same mission, requiring group integrity and identified as a group by the travel management service upon booking is not a mandatory user of the Government's contract city-pair fares. For group travel, agencies are expected to obtain air passenger transportation service that is practical and cost effective to the Government.

Note 2 to §301-10.107: Contractors are not authorized to use contract city-pair fares to perform travel under their contracts.

Note 3 to §301-10.107: If the Government contract city-pair carrier offers a lower cost capacity-controlled coach class contract fare (MCA, QCA, VCA, etc.) in addition to the unrestricted coach class contract fares (YCA), the traveler should use the lower cost capacity-controlled fare when it is available and meet mission needs.

[FTR Amdt. 2006-04, 71 FR 49374, Aug. 23, 2006, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2007-05, 72 FR 61537, Oct. 31, 2007]

§301-10.108   What requirements must be met to use a non-contract fare?

(a) Before purchasing a non-contract fare you must meet one of the exception requirements listed in §301-10.107 and show approval on your travel authorization to use a non-contract fare; and

(b) If the non-contract fare is non-refundable, restricted, or has specific eligibility requirements, you must know or reasonably anticipate, based on your planned trip, that you will use the ticket; and

(c) Your agency must determine that the proposed non-contract transportation is practical and cost effective for the Government.

Note to §301-10.108: Carrier preference is not a valid reason for using a non-contract fare.

[FTR Amdt. 2006-04, 71 FR 49374, Aug. 23, 2006]

§301-10.109   What is my liability for unauthorized use of a non-contract carrier when contract service is available and I do not meet one of the exceptions for required use?

Any additional costs or penalties incurred by you resulting from unauthorized use of non-contract service are borne by you.

§301-10.110   May I use contract passenger transportation service for personal travel?

No.

§301-10.111   When may I use a reduced group or charter fare?

You may use a reduced group or charter fare when your agency has determined, on an individual case basis prior to your travel, that use of such a fare is cost effective. Chartered aircraft are subject to the same rules as Government aircraft, and agencies in the executive branch of the Federal Government are subject to the requirements of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-126 and 41 CFR part 101-37 in making such cost effectiveness determinations.

[FTR Amdt. 108, 67 FR 57964, Sept. 13, 2002]

§301-10.112   What must I do when different airlines furnish the same service at different fares?

When there is no contract fare, and common carriers furnish the same service at different fares between the same points for the same type of accommodations, you must use the lowest cost service unless your agency determines that the use of higher cost service is more advantageous to the Government.

§301-10.113   What must I do if I change or do not use a common carrier reservation?

If you know you will change or not use your reservation, you must take action to change or cancel it as prescribed by your agency. Also, you must report all changes of your reservation according to your agency's procedures in an effort to prevent losses to the Government. Failure to do so may subject you to liability for any resulting losses.

§301-10.114   What must I do with unused Government Transportation Request(s) (GTR(s)), ticket(s) or refund application(s)?

You must submit any unused GTR(s), unused ticket coupons, unused e-tickets, or refund applications to your agency in accordance with your agency's procedures.

[FTR Amdt. 108, 67 FR 57964, Sept. 13, 2002]

§301-10.115   Am I authorized to receive a refund or credit for unused transportation?

No. You are not authorized to receive a refund, credit, or any other negotiable document from a carrier for unfurnished services (except as provided in §301-10.117) or any portion of an unused ticket issued in exchange for a GTR or billed to an agency's centrally billed account. However, any charges billed directly to your individually billed Government charge card should be credited to your account.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998; 63 FR 35537, June 30, 1998]

§301-10.116   What must I do with compensation an airline gives me if it denies me a seat on a plane?

If you are performing official travel and a carrier denies you a confirmed reserved seat on a plane, you must give your agency any payment you receive for liquidated damages. You must ensure the carrier shows the “Treasurer of the United States” as payee on the compensation check and then forward the payment to the appropriate agency official.

§301-10.117   May I keep compensation an airline gives me for voluntarily vacating my seat on my scheduled airline flight when the airline asks for volunteers?

Yes:

(a) If voluntarily vacating your seat will not interfere with performing your official duties; and

(b) If additional travel expenses, incurred as a result of vacating your seat, are borne by you and are not reimbursed; but

(c) If volunteering delays your travel during duty hours, your agency will charge you with annual leave for the additional hours.

Airline Accommodations

§301-10.121   What classes of airline accommodations are available?

Airlines are constantly updating their offerings. However, for the purposes of this regulation, the classes of available air accommodations are identified and defined as follows:

(a) Coach-class. The basic class of accommodation by airlines that is normally the lowest fare offered regardless of airline terminology used. For reference purposes only, coach-class may also be referred to by airlines as “tourist class,” “economy class,” or as “single class” when the airline offers only one class of accommodations to all travelers.

(b) Other than coach-class. Any class of accommodations above coach-class, e.g., first-class or business-class.

(1) First-class. The highest class of accommodation offered by the airlines in terms of cost and amenities. This is generally termed “first-class” by airlines and reservation systems.

(2) Business-class. A class of accommodation offered by airlines that is higher than coach and lower than first-class, in both cost and amenities. This class of accommodation is generally referred to as “business, business elite, business first, world business, connoisseur, or envoy” depending on the airline.

Note to §301-10.121: If an airline flight has only two classes of accommodations available, i.e., two “cabins”, with two distinctly different seating types (such as girth and pitch) and the front cabin is termed “business-class” or higher by the airline and the tickets are fare-coded as business-class, then the front of the cabin is deemed to be other than coach-class. Alternatively, if an airline flight has only two cabins available but equips both with one type of seating, (i.e., seating girth and pitch are the same in both cabins), and the seats in the front of the airplane are fare coded as full-fare economy class, and only restricted economy fares are available in the back of the aircraft, then the entire aircraft is to be classified as coach-class seating. In this second situation, qualifying for other than coach-class travel is not required to purchase a non-restricted economy fare seat in the front of the aircraft as the entire aircraft is considered “coach-class.”

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55147, Oct. 27, 2009]

§301-10.122   What class of airline accommodations must I use?

For official business travel, both domestic and international, you must use coach-class accommodations, except as provided under §§301-10.123 and 301-10.124.

§301-10.123   When may I use other than coach-class airline accommodations?

Government travelers are required to exercise the same care in incurring expenses that a prudent person would exercise if traveling on personal business when making official travel arrangements, and therefore, should consider the least expensive class of travel that meets their needs. You may use the lowest other than coach-class airline accommodations only when your agency specifically authorizes/approves such use as specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

(a) Your agency may authorize/approve first class accommodations if any of the following apply:

(1) No coach-class accommodations are reasonably available. “Reasonably available” means available on an airline that is scheduled to leave within 24 hours of your proposed departure time, or scheduled to arrive within 24 hours of your proposed arrival time;

(2) When use of other than coach-class is necessary to accommodate a medical disability or other special need.

(i) A disability must be certified annually in a written statement by a competent medical authority. However, if the disability is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required. Certification statements must include at a minimum:

(A) A written statement by a competent medical authority stating that special accommodation is necessary;

(B) An approximate duration of the special accommodation; and

(C) A recommendation as to the suitable class of transportation accommodations based on the disability.

(ii) A special need must be certified annually in writing according to your agency's procedures. However, if the special need is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required;

(iii) If you are authorized under §301-13.3(a) of this Subchapter to have an attendant accompany you, your agency may also authorize the attendant to use other than coach-class accommodations if you require the attendant's services en route;

(3) When exceptional security circumstances require other than coach-class airline accommodations. Exceptional security circumstances are determined by your agency and should only be authorized up to the minimum other than coach-class accommodation necessary. These circumstances include, but are not limited to:

(i) Use of coach-class accommodations would endanger your life or Government property;

(ii) You are an agent on protective detail and you are accompanying an individual authorized to use other than coach-class accommodations; or

(iii) You are a courier or control officer accompanying controlled pouches or packages;

(4) When required because of agency mission, consistent with your agency's internal procedures pursuant to §301-70.102(i).

(b) Your agency may authorize/approve business-class accommodations if any of the following apply:

(1) When use of other than coach-class is necessary to accommodate a medical disability or other special need.

(i) A disability must be certified annually in a written statement by a competent medical authority. However, if the disability is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required. Certification statements must include at a minimum:

(A) A written statement by a competent medical authority stating that special accommodation is necessary;

(B) An approximate duration of the special accommodation; and

(C) A recommendation as to the suitable class of transportation accommodations based on the disability.

(ii) A special need must be certified annually in writing according to your agency's procedures. However, if the special need is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required;

(iii) If you are authorized under §301-13.3(a) of this Subchapter to have an attendant accompany you, your agency may also authorize the attendant to use other than coach-class accommodations if you require the attendant's services en route;

(2) When exceptional security circumstances require other than coach-class airline accommodations. Exceptional security circumstances are determined by your agency and should only be authorized to the minimum other than coach-class accommodation necessary to meet the agency's mission. These circumstances include, but are not limited to:

(i) Use of coach-class accommodations would endanger your life or Government property;

(ii) You are an agent on protective detail and you are accompanying an individual authorized to use other than coach-class accommodations; or

(iii) You are a courier or control officer accompanying controlled pouches or packages;

(3) Coach-class accommodations on an authorized/approved foreign air carrier do not provide adequate sanitation or health standards;

(4) Regularly scheduled flights between origin/destination points (including connecting points) provide only other than coach-class accommodations and you certify such on your voucher;

(5) Your transportation costs are paid in full through agency acceptance of payment from a non-Federal source in accordance with Chapter 304 of this Title;

(6) Where the origin and/or destination are OCONUS, and the scheduled flight time, including stopovers and change of planes, is in excess of 14 hours, in accordance with §301-10.125;

(7) The use results in an overall cost savings to the Government by avoiding additional subsistence costs, overtime, or lost productive time while awaiting coach-class accommodations;

(8) No space is available in coach-class accommodations in time to accomplish the mission, which is urgent and cannot be postponed; or

(9) When required because of agency mission, consistent with your agency's internal procedures pursuant to §301-70.102(i).

Note 1 to §301-10.123: You may upgrade to other than coach-class accommodations at your personal expense, including through redemption of frequent flyer benefits.

Note 2 to §301-10.123: Blanket authorization of other than coach-class transportation accommodations is prohibited and shall be authorized on an individual trip-by-trip basis, unless the traveler has an up-to-date documented disability or special need.

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55147, Oct. 27, 2009]

§301-10.124   What are coach-class Seating Upgrade Programs?

Sometimes these programs are called “Coach Elite,” “Coach Plus,” “Preferred Coach” or some other identifier. Under these airline programs, a passenger may obtain for a fee a more desirable seat choice within the coach-class cabin. These airline upgrade or preferred seat choices are generally available for an annual fee, at an airport kiosk or gate or as a frequent flier perk. These coach upgrade options are not considered a new or higher class of accommodation since the seating is still in the coach cabin. However, the use of these upgraded/preferred coach seating options is generally a traveler's personal choice and therefore is at the traveler's personal expense. An agency travel authorization approving official or his/her designee (e.g., supervisor of the traveler) may authorize and reimburse the additional seat choice fee according to internal agency policy (see 301-70.102(k)).

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55148, Oct. 27, 2009, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-07, 75 FR 72967, Nov. 29, 2010]

§301-10.125   When may I use the 14-hour rule to travel other than coach-class (see §301-10.123(b)(6))?

(a) You may use the 14-hour rule to travel via other than coach-class when:

(1) The origin and/or destination are OCONUS; and

(2) The scheduled flight time, including non-overnight stopovers and change of planes, is in excess of 14 hours; and

(3) You are required to report to duty the following day or sooner.

(b) Scheduled flight time is the flight time between the originating departure point and the ultimate arrival point including scheduled non-overnight time spent at airports during plane changes. Scheduled non-overnight time does not include time spent at the originating or ultimate arrival airports.

(c) If other than coach-class accommodation is authorized based on the 14-hour rule then you will not be eligible for a rest stop en route or a rest period upon arrival at your duty site, in accordance with internal agency procedures pursuant to §301-70.102(j).

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55148, Oct. 27, 2009]

Use of United States Flag Air Carriers

Source: FTR Amdt. 74, 63 FR 63419, Nov. 13, 1998, unless otherwise noted.

§301-10.131   What does United States mean?

For purposes of the use of United States flag air carriers, United States means the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the territories and possessions of the United States (49 U.S.C. 40102).

§301-10.132   Who is required to use a U.S. flag air carrier?

Anyone whose air travel is financed by U.S. Government funds, except as provided in §301-10.135, §301-10.136, and §301-10.137.

§301-10.133   What is a U.S. flag air carrier?

An air carrier which holds a certificate under 49 U.S.C. 41102 but does not include a foreign air carrier operating under a permit.

§301-10.134   What is U.S. flag air carrier service?

U.S. flag air carrier service is service provided on an air carrier which holds a certificate under 49 U.S.C. 41102 and which service is authorized either by the carrier's certificate or by exemption or regulation. U.S. flag air carrier service also includes service provided under a code share agreement with a foreign air carrier in accordance with Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations when the ticket, or documentation for an electronic ticket, identifies the U.S. flag air carrier's designator code and flight number.

§301-10.135   When must I travel using U.S. flag air carrier service?

You are required by 49 U.S.C. 40118, commonly referred to as the “Fly America Act,” to use U.S. flag air carrier service for all air travel funded by the U.S. Government, except as provided in §301-10.136 and §301-10.137 or when one of the following exceptions applies:

(a) Use of a foreign air carrier is determined to be a matter of necessity in accordance with §301-10.138; or

(b) The transportation is provided under a bilateral or multilateral air transportation agreement to which the United States Government and the government of a foreign country are parties, and which the Department of Transportation has determined meets the requirements of the Fly America Act.

(1) Information on bilateral or multilateral air transportation agreements impacting United States Government procured transportation can be accessed at http://www.gsa.gov/openskies; and

(2) If determined appropriate, GSA may periodically issue FTR Bulletins providing further guidance on bilateral or multilateral air transportation agreements impacting United States Government procured transportation. These bulletins may be accessed at http://www.gsa.gov/bulletins.

(c) You are an officer or employee of the Department of State, United States Information Agency, United States International Development Cooperation Agency, or the Arms Control Disarmament Agency, and your travel is paid with funds appropriated to one of these agencies, and your travel is between two places outside the United States; or

(d) No U.S. flag air carrier provides service on a particular leg of the route, in which case foreign air carrier service may be used, but only to or from the nearest interchange point on a usually traveled route to connect with U.S. flag air carrier service; or

(e) A U.S. flag air carrier involuntarily reroutes your travel on a foreign air carrier; or

(f) Service on a foreign air carrier would be three hours or less, and use of the U.S. flag air carrier would at least double your en route travel time; or

(g) When the costs of transportation are reimbursed in full by a third party, such as a foreign government, international agency, or other organization.

[FTR Amdt. 74, 63 FR 63419, Nov. 13, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2009-02, 74 FR 2397, Jan. 15, 2009]

§301-10.136   What exceptions to the Fly America Act requirements apply when I travel between the United States and another country?

The exceptions are:

(a) If a U.S. flag air carrier offers nonstop or direct service (no aircraft change) from your origin to your destination, you must use the U.S. flag air carrier service unless such use would extend your travel time, including delay at origin, by 24 hours or more.

(b) If a U.S. flag air carrier does not offer nonstop or direct service (no aircraft change) between your origin and your destination, you must use a U.S. flag air carrier on every portion of the route where it provides service unless, when compared to using a foreign air carrier, such use would:

(1) Increase the number of aircraft changes you must make outside of the U.S. by 2 or more; or

(2) Extend your travel time by at least 6 hours or more; or

(3) Require a connecting time of 4 hours or more at an overseas interchange point.

§301-10.137   What exceptions to the Fly America Act requirements apply when I travel solely outside the United States, and a U.S. flag air carrier provides service between my origin and my destination?

You must always use a U.S. flag carrier for such travel, unless, when compared to using a foreign air carrier, such use would:

(a) Increase the number of aircraft changes you must make en route by 2 or more; or

(b) Extend your travel time by 6 hours or more; or

(c) Require a connecting time of 4 hours or more at an overseas interchange point.

§301-10.138   In what circumstances is foreign air carrier service deemed a matter of necessity?

(a) Foreign air carrier service is deemed a necessity when service by a U.S. flag air carrier is available, but

(1) Cannot provide the air transportation needed; or

(2) Will not accomplish the agency's mission.

(b) Necessity includes, but is not limited to, the following circumstances:

(1) When the agency determines that use of a foreign air carrier is necessary for medical reasons, including use of foreign air carrier service to reduce the number of connections and possible delays in the transportation of persons in need of medical treatment; or

(2) When use of a foreign air carrier is required to avoid an unreasonable risk to your safety and is approved by your agency (e.g., terrorist threats). Written approval of the use of foreign air carrier service based on an unreasonable risk to your safety must be approved by your agency on a case by case basis. An agency determination and approval of use of a foreign air carrier based on a threat against a U.S. flag air carrier must be supported by a travel advisory notice issued by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Department of State. An agency determination and approval of use of a foreign air carrier based on a threat against Government employees or other travelers must be supported by evidence of the threat(s) that form the basis of the determination and approval; or

(3) When you cannot purchase a ticket in your authorized class of service on a U.S. flag air carrier, and a seat is available in your authorized class of service on a foreign air carrier.

[FTR Amdt. 74, 63 FR 63419, Nov. 13, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2007-05, 72 FR 61537, Oct. 31, 2007]

§301-10.139   May I travel by a foreign air carrier if the cost of my ticket is less than traveling by a U.S. flag air carrier?

No. Foreign air carrier service may not be used solely based on the cost of your ticket.

§301-10.140   May I use a foreign air carrier if the service is preferred by or more convenient for my agency or me?

No. You must use U.S. flag air carrier service, unless you meet one of the exceptions in §301-10.135, §301-10.136, or §301-10.137 or unless foreign air carrier service is deemed a matter of necessity under §301-10.138.

§301-10.141   Must I provide any special certification or documents if I use a foreign air carrier?

Yes, you must provide a certification, as required in §301-10.142 and any other documents required by your agency. Your agency cannot pay your foreign air carrier fare if you do not provide the required certification.

[FTR Amdt. 74, 63 FR 63419, Nov. 13, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 108, 67 FR 57964, Sept. 13, 2002]

§301-10.142   What must the certification include?

The certification must include:

(a) Your name;

(b) The dates that you traveled;

(c) The origin and the destination of your travel;

(d) A detailed itinerary of your travel, name of the air carrier and flight number for each leg of the trip; and

(e) A statement explaining why you met one of the exceptions in §301-10.135, §301-10.136, or §301-10.137 or a copy of your agency's written approval that foreign air carrier service was deemed a matter of necessity in accordance with §301-10.138.

§301-10.143   What is my liability if I improperly use a foreign air carrier?

You will not be reimbursed for any transportation cost for which you improperly use foreign air carrier service. If you are authorized by your agency to use U.S. flag air carrier service for your entire trip, and you improperly use a foreign air carrier for any part of or the entire trip (i.e., when not permitted under this regulation), your transportation cost on the foreign air carrier will not be payable by your agency. If your agency authorizes you to use U.S. flag air carrier service for part of your trip and foreign air carrier service for another part of your trip, and you improperly use a foreign air carrier (i.e., when neither authorized to do so nor otherwise permitted under this regulation), your agency will pay the transportation cost on the foreign air carrier for only the portion(s) of the trip for which you were authorized to use foreign air carrier service. The agency must establish internal procedures for denying reimbursement to travelers when use of a foreign air carrier was neither authorized nor otherwise permitted under this regulation.

Train

§301-10.160   What classes of train accommodations are available?

(a) Coach-class—The basic class of accommodations offered by a rail carrier to passengers that includes a level of service available to all passengers regardless of the fare paid. Coach-class includes reserved coach accommodations as well as slumber coach accommodations when overnight train travel is involved.

(b) Slumber coach—Includes slumber coach accommodations on trains offering such accommodations, or the lowest level of sleeping accommodations available on a train that does not offer slumber coach accommodations.

(c) Other than coach-class - Any class of accommodations above coach, e.g., first-class or business-class.

(1) First-class—Includes bedrooms, roomettes, club service, parlor car accommodations or other premium accommodations.

(2) Business-class—A class of extra fare train service that is offered above coach class, but is lower than first-class, as described above.

Note to §301-10.160: If a train only has two classes of accommodations available, i.e., first and business class, then the business class is deemed to be classified as coach-class for purposes of official travel, as it is the lowest class offered.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 108, 67 FR 57965, Sept. 13, 2002; FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55148, Oct. 27, 2009]

§301-10.161   What class of train accommodations must I use?

You must use coach-class accommodations for all train travel, except when your agency authorizes other than coach-class service.

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55148, Oct. 27, 2009]

§301-10.162   When may I use other than coach-class train accommodations?

You may use other than coach-class train accommodations only when your agency specifically authorizes/approves this use under paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section.

(a) No coach-class accommodations are reasonably available on a train that is scheduled to leave within 24 hours of your proposed departure time, or scheduled to arrive within 24 hours of your proposed arrival time;

(b) When use of other than coach-class accommendations is necessary to accommodate a medical disability or other special need.

(1) A disability must be certified annually in a written statement by a competent medical authority. However, if the disability is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required. Certification statements must include at a minimum:

(i) A written statement by a competent medical authority stating that special accommodation is necessary;

(ii) An approximate duration of the special accommodation; and

(iii) A recommendation as to the suitable class of transportation accommodations based on the disability.

(2) A special need must be certified annually in writing according to your agency's procedures. However, if the special need is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required;

(3) If you are authorized under §301-13.3(a) of this Subchapter to have an attendant accompany you, your agency may also authorize the attendant to use other than coach-class accommodations if you require the attendant's services en route;

(c) When exceptional security circumstances require other than coach-class rail accommodations. Exceptional security circumstances are determined by your agency and should only be authorized to the minimum other than coach-class accommodation necessary to meet the agency's mission. These circumstances include, but are not limited to:

(1) Use of coach-class accommodations would endanger your life or Government property;

(2) You are an agent on protective detail and you are accompanying an individual authorized to use other than coach-class accommodations; or

(3) You are a courier or control officer accompanying controlled pouches or packages;

(d) Coach-class accommodations on an authorized/approved foreign rail carrier do not provide adequate sanitation or health standards; or

(e) When required because of agency mission, consistent with your agency's internal procedures pursuant to §301-70.102(i).

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55148, Oct. 27, 2009]

§301-10.163   What is an extra-fare train?

A train that operates at an increased fare due to the extra performance of the train (i.e., faster speed or fewer stops).

§301-10.164   When may I use extra-fare train service?

You may use extra-fare train service whenever your agency determines it is more advantageous to the Government or is required for security reasons. Extra-fare train service is considered to be a class above the lowest class offered on any particular train and must be authorized/approved as provided in §301-10.162.

[FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55149, Oct. 27, 2009]

Ship

§301-10.180   Must I travel by a U.S. flag ship?

Yes, when a U.S. flag ship is available unless the necessity of the mission requires the use of a foreign ship. (See 46 U.S.C. App. Sec. 1241.)

§301-10.181   What is my liability if I improperly use a foreign ship?

You are required to travel by U.S. flag ship for the entire trip, unless use of a foreign ship has been authorized by your agency. Any cost that is attributed to improper or unauthorized use of a foreign ship is your responsibility.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998; 63 FR 35537, June 30, 1998]

§301-10.182   What classes of ship accommodations are available?

Accommodations on ships vary according to deck levels.

(a) Other than lowest first-class—All classes above the lowest first-class, includes but is not limited to a suite.

(b) Lowest first-class—The least expensive class of reserved accommodations available on a ship.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55149, Oct. 27, 2009]

§301-10.183   What class of ship accommodations must I use?

You must use the lowest first-class accommodations when traveling by ship, except when your agency specifically authorizes/approves your use of other than lowest first-class ship accommodations under paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section.

(a) Lowest first class accommodations are not available on the ship.

(b) When use of other than lowest first-class accommodations is necessary to accommodate a medical disability or other special need.

(1) A disability must be certified annually in a written statement by a competent medical authority. However, if the disability is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required. Certification statements must include at a minimum:

(i) A written statement by a competent medical authority stating that special accommodation is necessary;

(ii) An approximate duration of the special accommodation; and

(iii) A recommendation as to the suitable class of transportation accommodations based on the disability.

(2) A special need must be certified annually in writing according to your agency's procedures. However, if the special need is a lifelong condition, then a one-time certification statement is required;

(3) If you are authorized under §301-13.3(a) of this Subchapter to have an attendant accompany you, your agency may also authorize the attendant to use other than lowest first-class class accommodations if you require the attendant's services en route;

(c) When exceptional security circumstances require other than lowest first-class travel. Exceptional security circumstances are determined by your agency and should only be authorized to the minimum other than lowest first-class travel accommodation necessary to meet the agency's mission. These circumstances include, but are not limited to:

(1) The use of lowest first-class accommodations would endanger your life or Government property; or

(2) You are an agent on protective detail and you are accompanying an individual authorized to use other than lowest first-class accommodations; or

(3) You are a courier or control officer accompanying controlled pouches or packages.

(d) When required because of agency mission, consistent with your agency's internal procedures pursuant to §301-70.102(i).

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2009-06, 74 FR 55149, Oct. 27, 2009]

Transit Systems

§301-10.190   When may I use a transit system as a means of transportation in conjunction with official travel?

You may use a transit system as a means of transportation in conjunction with official travel when such transportation is authorized and approved by your agency in the following manner:

(a) At your official station. (1) From your residence or other authorized point of departure, e.g., rail to airport;

(2) To your residence or other authorized point of return, e.g., airport to rail;

(3) From your residence to your office on the day you depart the official station on official TDY that requires at least one night's lodging; or

(4) From your office to your residence on the day you return to the official station from an official TDY assignment that required at least one night's lodging.

(b) At your TDY location. (1) From the TDY transit system station(s) to your place of lodging or place of official business and return;

(2) To, from, and between your places of lodging and official business;

(3) Between places of official business; or

(4) To obtain meals at the nearest available place when the nature and location of the official business or the lodging at a TDY location are such that meals cannot be obtained there. You must attach a statement or include electronic remarks with your travel voucher explaining why such transportation was necessary.

[FTR Amdt. 2010-02, 75 FR 24435, May 5, 2010]

Subpart C—Government Vehicle

§301-10.200   What types of Government vehicles may my agency authorize me to use?

You may be authorized to use:

(a) A Government automobile in accordance with §301-10.220;

(b) A Government aircraft in accordance with §§301-10.260 through 301-10.262 of this part; and

(c) Other type of Government vehicle in accordance with any Government-issued rules governing its use.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998; 63 FR 35537, June 30, 1998]

§301-10.201   For what purposes may I use a Government vehicle other than a Government aircraft?

Only for official purposes which include transportation:

(a) Between places of official business;

(b) Between such places and places of temporary lodging when public transportation is unavailable or its use is impractical;

(c) Between either paragraph (a) or (b) of this section and restaurants, drug stores, barber shops, places of worship, cleaning establishments, and similar places necessary for the sustenance, comfort, or health of the employee to foster the continued efficient performance of Government business; or

(d) As otherwise authorized by your agency under 31 U.S.C. 1344.

§301-10.202   What is my liability for unauthorized use of a Government vehicle?

You are responsible for any additional cost resulting from unauthorized use of a Government vehicle and you may be subject to administrative and/or criminal liability for misuse of Government property.

Government Automobiles

§301-10.220   What requirements must I meet to operate a Government automobile for official travel?

You must possess a valid State, District of Columbia, or territorial motor vehicle operator's license and have a travel authorization specifically authorizing the use of a Government-furnished automobile.

Travel on Government Aircraft

§301-10.260   May I use a Government aircraft for travel?

You may use Government aircraft for travel only if you have authorization from an executive agency under the rules specified in this part (except with regard to travel under §301-70.808 and §301-70.910). Because the taxpayers should pay no more than necessary for your transportation, generally you may travel on Government aircraft only when a Government aircraft is the most cost-effective mode of travel.

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004]

§301-10.261   When may I use a Government aircraft for travel?

You may use Government aircraft—

(a) For official travel only when—

(1) No scheduled commercial airline service is reasonably available (i.e., able to meet your departure and/or arrival requirements within a 24-hour period, unless you demonstrate that extraordinary circumstances require a shorter period) to fulfill your agency's travel requirement; or

(2) The cost of using a Government aircraft is less than the cost of the city-pair fare for scheduled commercial airline service or the cost of the lowest available full coach fare if a city-pair fare is not available to you. The cost of non-productive or lost work time while in travel status and certain other costs should be considered when comparing the cost of using a Government aircraft in lieu of scheduled commercial airline service. Additional information on costs included in this cost comparison may be found in the “U.S. Government Aircraft Cost Accounting Guide,” available from the General Services Administration, Office of Governmentwide Policy, MTA, 1800 F Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20405.

(b) For required-use travel only when you are required to use Government aircraft for bona fide communications (e.g., 24-hour secure communications) or security reasons (e.g., highly unusual circumstances that present a clear and present danger) or exceptional scheduling requirements (e.g., a national emergency or other compelling operational considerations). Required use travel may include travel for official, personal, or political purposes, but must be approved in accordance with §§301-10.262(a) and 301-70.803(a).

(c) For space available travel only when—

(1) The aircraft is already scheduled for use for an official purpose, and your use of the aircraft does not require a larger aircraft or result in more than minor additional cost to the Government; or

(2) You are a Federal traveler or a dependent of a Federal traveler stationed by the Government in a remote location not accessible to commercial airline service and authorized to use Government aircraft; or

(3) You are authorized to travel on a space available basis under 10 U.S.C. 2648 and regulations implementing that statute.

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-04, 75 FR 59095, Sept. 27, 2010]

§301-10.262   How will my agency authorize travel on Government aircraft?

Your agency will authorize your travel on Government aircraft as follows:

(a) Required use travelers. Your agency's senior legal official or his/her principal deputy must authorize your required-use travel on a trip-by-trip basis, in advance, in writing, and in compliance with the agency's written policies describing the special circumstances under which the agency will require a traveler to use Government aircraft, unless—

(1) You are an agency head and the President has determined that all your travel (or your travel in specified categories) qualifies as required-use travel; or

(2) You are not an agency head, and your agency head has determined in writing that all of your travel, or your travel in specified categories, qualifies as required-use travel. Such written explanation must state the specific basis for the determination.

Note to §301-10.262(a): In an emergency situation, prior verbal approval for required-use travel with an after-the-fact written authorization is permitted.

(b) Senior Federal officials. If you are a senior Federal official, your agency's senior legal official or his/her principal deputy must authorize all your travel on Government aircraft in advance and in writing, except for required use travel authorized under paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section. In an emergency situation, prior verbal approval with an after-the-fact written authorization by your agency's senior legal official is permitted. Senior Federal officials who are crewmembers or qualified non-crewmembers on a flight in which they are also traveling (i.e., being transported from point to point) are considered travelers and must be authorized to travel on Government aircraft according to this paragraph.

(c) Non-Federal travelers. If you are a non-Federal traveler, the senior legal official or his/her principal deputy in the agency sponsoring your travel must authorize you to fly on Government aircraft in advance and in writing. In an emergency situation, prior verbal approval with an after-the-fact written authorization by your sponsoring agency's senior legal official is permitted.

(d) All other Federal travelers. Your designated travel-approving official (or anyone to whom he/she delegates this authority), who must be at least one organizational level above you, must authorize your travel on Government aircraft, in advance and in writing. Prior verbal approval with an after-the-fact written authorization by your agency's designated travel approving official is permitted in an emergency situation. If you hold a blanket travel authorization for official travel that authorizes travel on Government aircraft, it must define the circumstances that must be met for using Government aircraft and must comply with this regulation and any additional agency policies. Travel on Government aircraft that does not meet the circumstances specified in the blanket travel authorization must be authorized on a trip-by-trip basis in accordance with this regulation and other applicable agency policies. Check with your designated travel approving official for information on your agency's policy.

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004]

§301-10.263   What travel authorization documents must I present to the aircraft management office that operates the Government aircraft?

You must present to the aircraft management office that operates the Government aircraft—

(a) A copy of your written travel authorization, including a blanket travel authorization, if applicable, approved in accordance with §301-10.262; and

(b) Valid picture identification, such as a Government identification card or a state-issued driver's license.

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004]

§301-10.264   What amount must the Government be reimbursed for travel on Government aircraft?

(a) No reimbursement is required for official travel on a Government aircraft.

(b) For personal travel on Government aircraft, reimbursement depends upon which of the following special cases applies:

(1) For any required use travel, you must reimburse the Government for the excess of the full coach fare for all flights taken over the full coach fare for the flights that you would have taken had you not engaged in personal activities during the trip, i.e., for a wholly personal trip, you must pay the full coach fare for the entire trip;

(2) For travel authorized under 10 U.S.C. 2648 and regulations implementing that statute, or when you or your dependents are stationed by the Government in a remote location with no access to regularly scheduled commercial airline service and are authorized to use Government aircraft, you do not have to reimburse the Government.

(c) For political travel on a Government aircraft (i.e., for any trip or part of a trip during which you engage in political activities), the Government must be reimbursed the excess of the full coach fare for all flights taken on the trip over the full coach fare for the flights that you would have taken had you not engaged in political activities, except if other law or regulation specifies a different amount (see, e.g., 11 CFR 106.3, “Allocation of Expenses between Campaign and Non-campaign Related Travel”), in which case the amount reimbursed is the amount required by such law or regulation.

Note to §301-10.264: Except for required use travel, any use of Government aircraft for personal or political activities shall not cause an increase in the actual costs to the Government of operating the aircraft.

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-04, 75 FR 59095, Sept. 27, 2010]

§301-10.265   Will my travel on Government aircraft be reported?

Your travel on Government aircraft will not be reported unless you are a senior Federal official, or a non-Federal traveler. (Travel under 10 U.S.C. 2648 is not reported.) If you are a senior Federal official or a non-Federal traveler, any use you make of Government aircraft, i.e., as a passenger, crewmember, or qualified non-crewmember, will be reported to the General Services Administration (GSA) by the agency that owns or hires the Government aircraft. (Agencies must maintain information on classified trips, but do not report classified trips to GSA.)

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-04, 75 FR 59095, Sept. 27, 2010]

§301-10.266   Is information available to the public about travel on Government aircraft by senior Federal officials and non-Federal travelers?

Yes, an agency that authorizes travel on Government aircraft and an agency that owns or hires Government aircraft must make records about travelers on those aircraft available to the public in response to written requests under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552), except for portions exempt from disclosure under that Act (such as classified information).

[FTR Amdt. 2004-02, 69 FR 34304, June 21, 2004]

Subpart D—Privately Owned Vehicle (POV)

§301-10.300   When may I use a POV for official travel?

When authorized by your agency.

§301-10.301   How do I compute my mileage reimbursement?

You compute mileage reimbursement by multiplying the distance traveled, determined under §301-10.302 of this subpart by the applicable mileage rate.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-07, 75 FR 72967, Nov. 29, 2010]

§301-10.302   How do I determine distance measurements for my travel?

If you travel byThe distance between your origin and destination is
Privately owned automobile or privately owned motorcycleAs shown in paper or electronic standard highway mileage guides, or the actual miles driven as determined from odometer readings.
Privately owned aircraftAs determined from charts issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). You may include in your travel claim with an explanation any additional air mileage resulting from a detour necessary due to adverse weather, mechanical difficulty, or other unusual conditions. If a required deviation is such that airway mileage charts are not adequate to determine distance, you may use the formula of flight time multiplied by cruising speed of the aircraft to determine distance. You must convert nautical miles to statute or regular miles when submitting a claim (1 nautical mile equals 1.15077945 statute miles).

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 108, 67 FR 57965, Sept. 13, 2002; FTR Amdt. 2005-05, 70 FR 61046, Oct. 20, 2005; FTR Amdt. 2010-04, 75 FR 59095, Sept. 27, 2010]

§301-10.303   What am I reimbursed when use of POV is determined by my agency to be advantageous to the Government?

You will be reimbursed an applicable mileage rate based on the type of POV you actually use (privately owned airplane, privately owned automobile, privately owned motorcycle). These rates will be published in an FTR bulletin and are also displayed on GSA's Web site (http://www.gsa.gov/mileage).

[FTR Amdt. 2010-07, 75 FR 72967, Nov. 29, 2010]

§301-10.304   What expenses are allowable in addition to the POV mileage rate allowances?

Following is a chart listing the reimbursable and non-reimbursable expenses:

Reimbursable expenses in addition to mileage allowance Non-reimbursable expenses included in the mileage allowance
Parking fees; ferry fees; bridge, road, and tunnel fees; and aircraft or airplane parking, landing, and tie-down feesCharges for repairs, depreciation, replacements, grease, oil, antifreeze, towage and similar speculative expenses, gasoline, insurance, state and Federal taxes.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 108, 67 FR 57965, Sept. 13, 2002]

§301-10.305   How is reimbursement handled if another person(s) travels in a POV with me?

If another employee(s) travels with you on the same trip in the same POV, mileage is payable to only one of you. No deduction will be made from your mileage allowance if other passengers contribute to defraying your expenses.

§301-10.306   What will I be reimbursed if authorized to use a POV between my residence and office and then from my office to a common carrier terminal, or from my residence directly to a common carrier terminal?

If determined advantageous to the Government, you will be reimbursed on a mileage basis plus other allowable costs for round-trip travel on the beginning and/or ending of travel between the points involved.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR. Amdt. 2005-05, 70 FR 61047, Oct. 20, 2005]

§301-10.307   What will I be reimbursed if I use a POV to transport other employees?

Using a POV to transport other employees is strictly voluntary and you may be reimbursed in accordance with §301-10.305.

§301-10.308   What will I be reimbursed if I park my POV at a common carrier terminal while I am away from my official station?

Your agency may reimburse your parking fee as an allowable transportation expense not to exceed the cost of taxi fare to/from the terminal.

§301-10.309   What will I be reimbursed if I am authorized to use common carrier transportation and I use a POV instead?

You will be reimbursed on a mileage basis, plus per diem, not to exceed the total constructive cost of the authorized method of common carrier transportation plus per diem. Your agency must determine the constructive cost of transportation and per diem by common carrier under the rules in §301-10.310.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-07, 75 FR 72967, Nov. 29, 2010]

§301-10.310   What will I be reimbursed if I am authorized to use a Government owned automobile and I use a privately owned automobile instead?

You will be reimbursed based on a constructive mileage rate limited to the cost that would be incurred for use of a Government automobile. This rate will be published in an FTR bulletin available at http://www.gsa.gov/ftr. If your agency determines the cost of providing a GOA would be higher because of unusual circumstances, it may allow reimbursement not to exceed the mileage rate for a POA. In addition, you may be reimbursed other allowable expenses as provided in §301-10.304.

[FTR Amdt. 2010-07, 75 FR 72967, Nov. 29, 2010]

Subpart E—Special Conveyances

§301-10.400   What types of special conveyances may my agency authorize me to use?

Your agency may authorize/approve use of:

(a) Taxicabs as specified in §§301-10.420 through 301-10.421 of this chapter;

(b) Commercial rental automobiles as specified in §§301-10.450 through 301-10.453 of this chapter; or

(c) Any other special conveyance when determined to be advantageous to the Government.

§301-10.401   What types of charges are reimbursable for use of a special conveyance?

Actual expenses that your agency determines are necessary, including, but not limited to:

(a) Gasoline and oil;

(b) Rental of a garage, hangar, or boathouse;

(c) Feeding and stabling of horses;

(d) Per diem of operator; and

(e) Ferriage, tolls, etc.

§301-10.402   What will I be reimbursed if I am authorized to use a special conveyance and I use a POV instead?

You will be reimbursed the mileage cost for the use of your POV, and additional expenses such as parking fees, bridge, road and tunnel fees, not to exceed the constructive cost of the special conveyance.

§301-10.403   What is the difference between a Government aircraft and an aircraft hired as a special conveyance?

A Government aircraft is any aircraft owned, leased, chartered, or rented and operated by the Government. An aircraft hired as a special conveyance is an aircraft that you, in your private capacity, rent, lease, or charter and operate.

Taxicabs, Shuttle Services, or Other Courtesy Transportation

§301-10.420   When may I use a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation?

(a) When authorized and approved by your agency, your transportation expenses in the performance of official travel are reimbursable for the usual fare plus tip for use of a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation (if charges result), in the following manner:

(1) At your official station. (i) From your residence or other authorized point of departure, e.g., residence to airport;

(ii) To your residence or other authorized point of return, e.g., airport to residence;

(iii) From your residence to your office on the day you depart the official station on official TDY that requires at least one night's lodging; or

(iv) From your office to your residence on the day you return to the official station from an official TDY assignment that required at least one night's lodging.

(2) At your TDY location. (i) From the TDY transit system station to your place of lodging or place of official business and return;

(ii) To, from, and between your places of lodging and official business;

(iii) Between places of official business; or

(iv) To obtain meals at the nearest available place when the nature and location of the official business or the lodging at a TDY location are such that meals cannot be obtained there. You must attach a statement or include electronic remarks with your travel voucher explaining why such transportation was necessary.

(b) Courtesy transportation. You should use courtesy transportation service furnished by hotels/motels to the maximum extent possible as a first source of transportation between a place of lodging at the TDY station and a common carrier terminal. You will be reimbursed for tips when you use courtesy transportation service.

(c) Restrictions. When appropriate, your agency will restrict or place a monetary limit on the amount of reimbursement for the use of taxicabs under this paragraph when—

(1) Suitable Government or common carrier transportation service, including shuttle service, is available for all or part of the distance involved; or

(2) Courtesy transportation service is provided by hotels/motels between the place of lodging at the TDY station and the common carrier terminal.

[FTR Amdt. 2010-02, 75 FR 24435, May 5, 2010]

§301-10.421   How much will my agency reimburse me for a tip to a taxi, shuttle service, courtesy transportation driver, or valet parking attendant?

An amount which your agency determines to be reasonable.

Rental Automobiles

§301-10.450   When and from whom may I rent a vehicle for official travel when authorized?

(a) Your agency must determine that use of a rental vehicle is advantageous to the Government and must specifically authorize such use.

(b) When authorized to use a rental vehicle, you should consider renting a vehicle from a vendor that participates in the Defense Travel Management Office (DTMO) U.S. Government Car Rental Agreement to avail yourself of the Agreement's benefits, including the insurance and damage liability provisions, unless you are OCONUS and no agreement is in place for your TDY location. The advantages of renting a car through the DTMO rental car program are:

(1) Rental car agreements are pre-negotiated;

(2) The agreement includes automatic unlimited mileage and collision damage insurance; and

(3) The rates established by the car rental agreement cannot be exceeded by the vendor.

[FTR Amdt. 70, 63 FR 15955, Apr. 1, 1998, as amended by FTR Amdt. 2010-05, 75 FR 63103, Oct. 14, 2010]

§301-10.451   May I be reimbursed for the cost of collision damage waiver (CDW) or theft insurance?

(a) General rule—no. You will not be reimbursed for CDW or theft insurance for travel within CONUS for the following reasons:

(1) The Government is a self-insurer.

(2) Rental vehicles available under agreement(s) with the Government includes full coverage insurance for damages resulting from an accident while performing official travel.

(3) Any deductible amount paid by you may be reimbursed directly to you or directly to the rental agency if the damage occurred while you were performing official business.

(b) Exception. You will be reimbursed for collision damage waiver or theft insurance when you travel outside CONUS and such insurance is necessary because the rental or leasing agency requirements, foreign statute, or legal procedures could cause extreme difficulty for an employee involved in an accident.

§301-10.452   May I be reimbursed for personal accident insurance?

No. That is a personal expense and is not reimbursable.

§301-10.453   What is my liability for unauthorized use of a rental automobile obtained with Government funds?

You are responsible for any additional cost resulting from the unauthorized use of a commercial rental automobile for other than official travel-related purposes.



For questions or comments regarding e-CFR editorial content, features, or design, email ecfr@nara.gov.
For questions concerning e-CFR programming and delivery issues, email webteam@gpo.gov.