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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 17, 2014

Title 40: Protection of Environment


PART 130—WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT


Contents
§130.0   Program summary and purpose.
§130.1   Applicability.
§130.2   Definitions.
§130.3   Water quality standards.
§130.4   Water quality monitoring.
§130.5   Continuing planning process.
§130.6   Water quality management plans.
§130.7   Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.
§130.8   Water quality report.
§130.9   Designation and de-designation.
§130.10   State submittals to EPA.
§130.11   Program management.
§130.12   Coordination with other programs.
§130.15   Processing application for Indian tribes.

Authority: 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.

Source: 50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

§130.0   Program summary and purpose.

(a) This subpart establishes policies and program requirements for water quality planning, management and implementation under sections 106, 205(j), non-construction management 205(g), 208, 303 and 305 of the Clean Water Act. The Water Quality Management (WQM) process described in the Act and in this regulation provides the authority for a consistent national approach for maintaining, improving and protecting water quality while allowing States to implement the most effective individual programs. The process is implemented jointly by EPA, the States, interstate agencies, and areawide, local and regional planning organizations. This regulation explains the requirements of the Act, describes the relationships between the several components of the WQM process and outlines the roles of the major participants in the process. The components of the WQM process are discussed below.

(b) Water quality standards (WQS) are the State's goals for individual water bodies and provide the legal basis for control decisions under the Act. Water quality monitoring activities provide the chemical, physical and biological data needed to determine the present quality of a State's waters and to identify the sources of pollutants in those waters. The primary assessment of the quality of a State's water is contained in its biennial Report to Congress required by section 305(b) of the Act.

(c) This report and other assessments of water quality are used in the State's WQM plans to identify priority water quality problems. These plans also contain the results of the State's analyses and management decisions which are necessary to control specific sources of pollution. The plans recommend control measures and designated management agencies (DMAs) to attain the goals established in the State's water quality standards.

(d) These control measures are implemented by issuing permits, building publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs), instituting best management practices for nonpoint sources of pollution and other means. After control measures are in place, the State evaluates the extent of the resulting improvements in water quality, conducts additional data gathering and planning to determine needed modifications in control measures and again institutes control measures.

(e) This process is a dynamic one, in which requirements and emphases vary over time. At present, States have completed WQM plans which are generally comprehensive in geographic and programmatic scope. Technology based controls are being implemented for most point sources of pollution. However, WQS have not been attained in many water bodies and are threatened in others.

(f) Present continuing planning requirements serve to identify these critical water bodies, develop plans for achieving higher levels of abatement and specify additional control measures. Consequently, this regulation reflects a programmatic emphasis on concentrating planning and abatement activities on priority water quality issues and geographic areas. EPA will focus its grant funds on activities designed to address these priorities. Annual work programs negotiated between EPA and State and interstate agencies will reflect this emphasis.

§130.1   Applicability.

(a) This subpart applies to all State, eligible Indian Tribe, interstate, areawide and regional and local CWA water quality planning and management activities undertaken on or after February 11, 1985 including all updates and continuing certifications for approved Water Quality Management (WQM) plans developed under sections 208 and 303 of the Act.

(b) Planning and management activities undertaken prior to February 11, 1985 are governed by the requirements of the regulations in effect at the time of the last grant award.

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 54 FR 14359, Apr. 11, 1989; 59 FR 13817, Mar. 23, 1994]

§130.2   Definitions.

(a) The Act. The Clean Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.

(b) Indian Tribe. Any Indian Tribe, band, group, or community recognized by the Secretary of the Interior and exercising governmental authority over a Federal Indian reservation.

(c) Pollution. The man-made or man-induced alteration of the chemical, physical, biological, and radiological integrity of water.

(d) Water quality standards (WQS). Provisions of State or Federal law which consist of a designated use or uses for the waters of the United States and water quality criteria for such waters based upon such uses. Water quality standards are to protect the public health or welfare, enhance the quality of water and serve the purposes of the Act.

(e) Load or loading. An amount of matter or thermal energy that is introduced into a receiving water; to introduce matter or thermal energy into a receiving water. Loading may be either man-caused (pollutant loading) or natural (natural background loading).

(f) Loading capacity. The greatest amount of loading that a water can receive without violating water quality standards.

(g) Load allocation (LA). The portion of a receiving water's loading capacity that is attributed either to one of its existing or future nonpoint sources of pollution or to natural background sources. Load allocations are best estimates of the loading, which may range from reasonably accurate estimates to gross allotments, depending on the availability of data and appropriate techniques for predicting the loading. Wherever possible, natural and nonpoint source loads should be distinguished.

(h) Wasteload allocation (WLA). The portion of a receiving water's loading capacity that is allocated to one of its existing or future point sources of pollution. WLAs constitute a type of water quality-based effluent limitation.

(i) Total maximum daily load (TMDL). The sum of the individual WLAs for point sources and LAs for nonpoint sources and natural background. If a receiving water has only one point source discharger, the TMDL is the sum of that point source WLA plus the LAs for any nonpoint sources of pollution and natural background sources, tributaries, or adjacent segments. TMDLs can be expressed in terms of either mass per time, toxicity, or other appropriate measure. If Best Management Practices (BMPs) or other nonpoint source pollution controls make more stringent load allocations practicable, then wasteload allocations can be made less stringent. Thus, the TMDL process provides for nonpoint source control tradeoffs.

(j) Water quality limited segment. Any segment where it is known that water quality does not meet applicable water quality standards, and/or is not expected to meet applicable water quality standards, even after the application of the technology-based effluent limitations required by sections 301(b) and 306 of the Act.

(k) Water quality management (WQM) plan. A State or areawide waste treatment management plan developed and updated in accordance with the provisions of sections 205(j), 208 and 303 of the Act and this regulation.

(l) Areawide agency. An agency designated under section 208 of the Act, which has responsibilities for WQM planning within a specified area of a State.

(m) Best Management Practice (BMP). Methods, measures or practices selected by an agency to meet its nonpoint source control needs. BMPs include but are not limited to structural and nonstructural controls and operation and maintenance procedures. BMPs can be applied before, during and after pollution-producing activities to reduce or eliminate the introduction of pollutants into receiving waters.

(n) Designated management agency (DMA). An agency identified by a WQM plan and designated by the Governor to implement specific control recommendations.

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 54 FR 14359, Apr. 11, 1989]

§130.3   Water quality standards.

A water quality standard (WQS) defines the water quality goals of a water body, or portion thereof, by designating the use or uses to be made of the water and by setting criteria necessary to protect the uses. States and EPA adopt WQS to protect public health or welfare, enhance the quality of water and serve the purposes of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Serve the purposes of Act (as defined in sections 101(a)(2) and 303(c) of the Act) means that WQS should, wherever attainable, provide water quality for the protection and propagation of fish, shellfish and wildlife and for recreation in and on the water and take into consideration their use and value for public water supplies, propagation of fish, shellfish, wildlife, recreation in and on the water, and agricultural, industrial and other purposes including navigation.

Such standards serve the dual purposes of establishing the water quality goals for a specific water body and serving as the regulatory basis for establishment of water quality-based treatment controls and strategies beyond the technology-based level of treatment required by sections 301(b) and 306 of the Act. States shall review and revise WQS in accordance with applicable regulations and, as appropriate, update their Water Quality Management (WQM) plans to reflect such revisions. Specific WQS requirements are found in 40 CFR part 131.

§130.4   Water quality monitoring.

(a) In accordance with section 106(e)(1), States must establish appropriate monitoring methods and procedures (including biological monitoring) necessary to compile and analyze data on the quality of waters of the United States and, to the extent practicable, ground-waters. This requirement need not be met by Indian Tribes. However, any monitoring and/or analysis activities undertaken by a Tribe must be performed in accordance with EPA's quality assurance/quality control guidance.

(b) The State's water monitoring program shall include collection and analysis of physical, chemical and biological data and quality assurance and control programs to assure scientifically valid data. The uses of these data include determining abatement and control priorities; developing and reviewing water quality standards, total maximum daily loads, wasteload allocations and load allocations; assessing compliance with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits by dischargers; reporting information to the public through the section 305(b) report and reviewing site-specific monitoring efforts.

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 54 FR 14359, Apr. 11, 1989]

§130.5   Continuing planning process.

(a) General. Each State shall establish and maintain a continuing planning process (CPP) as described under section 303(e)(3)(A)-(H) of the Act. Each State is responsible for managing its water quality program to implement the processes specified in the continuing planning process. EPA is responsible for periodically reviewing the adequacy of the State's CPP.

(b) Content. The State may determine the format of its CPP as long as the mininum requirements of the CWA and this regulation are met. The following processes must be described in each State CPP, and the State may include other processes at its discretion.

(1) The process for developing effluent limitations and schedules of compliance at least as stringent as those required by sections 301(b) (1) and (2), 306 and 307, and at least stringent as any requirements contained in applicable water quality standards in effect under authority of section 303 of the Act.

(2) The process for incorporating elements of any applicable areawide waste treatment plans under section 208, and applicable basin plans under section 209 of the Act.

(3) The process for developing total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and individual water quality based effluent limitations for pollutants in accordance with section 303(d) of the Act and §130.7(a) of this regulation.

(4) The process for updating and maintaining Water Quality Management (WQM) plans, including schedules for revision.

(5) The process for assuring adequate authority for intergovernmental cooperation in the implementation of the State WQM program.

(6) The process for establishing and assuring adequate implementation of new or revised water quality standards, including schedules of compliance, under section 303(c) of the Act.

(7) The process for assuring adequate controls over the disposition of all residual waste from any water treatment processing.

(8) The process for developing an inventory and ranking, in order of priority of needs for construction of waste treatment works required to meet the applicable requirements of sections 301 and 302 of the Act.

(9) The process for determining the priority of permit issuance.

(c) Regional Administrator review. The Regional Administrator shall review approved State CPPs from time to time to ensure that the planning processes are consistent with the Act and this regulation. The Regional Administrator shall not approve any permit program under Title IV of the Act for any State which does not have an approved continuing planning process.

§130.6   Water quality management plans.

(a) Water quality management (WQM) plans. WQM plans consist of initial plans produced in accordance with sections 208 and 303(e) of the Act and certified and approved updates to those plans. Continuing water quality planning shall be based upon WQM plans and water quality problems identified in the latest 305(b) reports. State water quality planning should focus annually on priority issues and geographic areas and on the development of water quality controls leading to implementation measures. Water quality planning directed at the removal of conditions placed on previously certified and approved WQM plans should focus on removal of conditions which will lead to control decisions.

(b) Use of WQM plans. WQM plans are used to direct implementation. WQM plans draw upon the water quality assessments to identify priority point and nonpoint water quality problems, consider alternative solutions and recommend control measures, including the financial and institutional measures necessary for implementing recommended solutions. State annual work programs shall be based upon the priority issues identified in the State WQM plan.

(c) WQM plan elements. Sections 205(j), 208 and 303 of the Act specify water quality planning requirements. The following plan elements shall be included in the WQM plan or referenced as part of the WQM plan if contained in separate documents when they are needed to address water quality problems.

(1) Total maximum daily loads. TMDLs in accordance with sections 303(d) and (e)(3)(C) of the Act and §130.7 of this part.

(2) Effluent limitations. Effluent limitations including water quality based effluent limitations and schedules of compliance in accordance with section 303(e)(3)(A) of the Act and §130.5 of this part.

(3) Municipal and industrial waste treatment. Identification of anticipated municipal and industrial waste treatment works, including facilities for treatment of stormwater-induced combined sewer overflows; programs to provide necessary financial arrangements for such works; establishment of construction priorities and schedules for initiation and completion of such treatment works including an identification of open space and recreation opportunities from improved water quality in accordance with section 208(b)(2) (A) and (B) of the Act.

(4) Nonpoint source management and control. (i) The plan shall describe the regulatory and non-regulatory programs, activities and Best Management Practices (BMPs) which the agency has selected as the means to control nonpoint source pollution where necessary to protect or achieve approved water uses. Economic, institutional, and technical factors shall be considered in a continuing process of identifying control needs and evaluating and modifying the BMPs as necessary to achieve water quality goals.

(ii) Regulatory programs shall be identified where they are determined to be necessary by the State to attain or maintain an approved water use or where non-regulatory approaches are inappropriate in accomplishing that objective.

(iii) BMPs shall be identified for the nonpoint sources identified in section 208(b)(2)(F)-(K) of the Act and other nonpoint sources as follows:

(A) Residual waste. Identification of a process to control the disposition of all residual waste in the area which could affect water quality in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(J) of the Act.

(B) Land disposal. Identification of a process to control the disposal of pollutants on land or in subsurface excavations to protect ground and surface water quality in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(K) of the Act.

(C) Agricultural and silvicultural. Identification of procedures to control agricultural and silvicultural sources of pollution in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(F) of the Act.

(D) Mines. Identification of procedures to control mine-related sources of pollution in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(G) of the Act.

(E) Construction. Identification of procedures to control construction related sources of pollution in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(H) of the Act.

(F) Saltwater intrusion. Identification of procedures to control saltwater intrusion in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(I) of the Act.

(G) Urban stormwater. Identification of BMPs for urban stormwater control to achieve water quality goals and fiscal analysis of the necessary capital and operations and maintenance expenditures in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(A) of the Act.

(iv) The nonpoint source plan elements outlined in §130.6(c) (4)(iii)(A)(G) of this regulation shall be the basis of water quality activities implemented through agreements or memoranda of understanding between EPA and other departments, agencies or instrumentalities of the United States in accordance with section 304(k) of the Act.

(5) Management agencies. Identification of agencies necessary to carry out the plan and provision for adequate authority for intergovernmental cooperation in accordance with sections 208(b)(2)(D) and 303(e)(3)(E) of the Act. Management agencies must demonstrate the legal, institutional, managerial and financial capability and specific activities necessary to carry out their responsibilities in accordance with section 208(c)(2)(A) through (I) of the Act.

(6) Implementation measures. Identification of implementation measures necessary to carry out the plan, including financing, the time needed to carry out the plan, and the economic, social and environmental impact of carrying out the plan in accordance with section 208(b)(2)(E).

(7) Dredge or fill program. Identification and development of programs for the control of dredge or fill material in accordance with section 208(b)(4)(B) of the Act.

(8) Basin plans. Identification of any relationship to applicable basin plans developed under section 209 of the Act.

(9) Ground water. Identification and development of programs for control of ground-water pollution including the provisions of section 208(b)(2)(K) of the Act. States are not required to develop ground-water WQM plan elements beyond the requirements of section 208(b)(2)(K) of the Act, but may develop a ground-water plan element if they determine it is necessary to address a ground-water quality problem. If a State chooses to develop a ground-water plan element, it should describe the essentials of a State program and should include, but is not limited to:

(i) Overall goals, policies and legislative authorities for protection of ground-water.

(ii) Monitoring and resource assessment programs in accordance with section 106(e)(1) of the Act.

(iii) Programs to control sources of contamination of ground-water including Federal programs delegated to the State and additional programs authorized in State statutes.

(iv) Procedures for coordination of ground-water protection programs among State agencies and with local and Federal agencies.

(v) Procedures for program management and administration including provision of program financing, training and technical assistance, public participation, and emergency management.

(d) Indian Tribes. An Indian Tribe is eligible for the purposes of this rule and the Clean Water Act assistance programs under 40 CFR part 35, subparts A and H if:

(1) The Indian Tribe has a governing body carrying out substantial governmental duties and powers;

(2) The functions to be exercised by the Indian Tribe pertain to the management and protection of water resources which are held by an Indian Tribe, held by the United States in trust for Indians, held by a member of an Indian Tribe if such property interest is subject to a trust restriction on alienation, or otherwise within the borders of an Indian reservation; and

(3) The Indian Tribe is reasonably expected to be capable, in the Regional Administrator's judgment, of carrying out the functions to be exercised in a manner consistent with the terms and purposes of the Clean Water Act and applicable regulations.

(e) Update and certification. State and/or areawide agency WQM plans shall be updated as needed to reflect changing water quality conditions, results of implementation actions, new requirements or to remove conditions in prior conditional or partial plan approvals. Regional Administrators may require that State WQM plans be updated as needed. State Continuing Planning Processes (CPPs) shall specify the process and schedule used to revise WQM plans. The State shall ensure that State and areawide WQM plans together include all necessary plan elements and that such plans are consistent with one another. The Governor or the Governor's designee shall certify by letter to the Regional Administrator for EPA approval that WQM plan updates are consistent with all other parts of the plan. The certification may be contained in the annual State work program.

(f) Consistency. Construction grant and permit decisions must be made in accordance with certified and approved WQM plans as described in §§130.12(a) and 130.12(b).

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 54 FR 14360, Apr. 11, 1989; 59 FR 13818, Mar. 23, 1994]

§130.7   Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

(a) General. The process for identifying water quality limited segments still requiring wasteload allocations, load allocations and total maximum daily loads (WLAs/LAs and TMDLs), setting priorities for developing these loads; establishing these loads for segments identified, including water quality monitoring, modeling, data analysis, calculation methods, and list of pollutants to be regulated; submitting the State's list of segments identified, priority ranking, and loads established (WLAs/LAs/TMDLs) to EPA for approval; incorporating the approved loads into the State's WQM plans and NPDES permits; and involving the public, affected dischargers, designated areawide agencies, and local governments in this process shall be clearly described in the State Continuing Planning Process (CPP).

(b) Identification and priority setting for water quality-limited segments still requiring TMDLs.

(1) Each State shall identify those water quality-limited segments still requiring TMDLs within its boundaries for which:

(i) Technology-based effluent limitations required by sections 301(b), 306, 307, or other sections of the Act;

(ii) More stringent effluent limitations (including prohibitions) required by either State or local authority preserved by section 510 of the Act, or Federal authority (law, regulation, or treaty); and

(iii) Other pollution control requirements (e.g., best management practices) required by local, State, or Federal authority are not stringent enough to implement any water quality standards (WQS) applicable to such waters.

(2) Each State shall also identify on the same list developed under paragraph (b)(1) of this section those water quality-limited segments still requiring TMDLs or parts thereof within its boundaries for which controls on thermal discharges under section 301 or State or local requirements are not stringent enough to assure protection and propagation of a balanced indigenous population of shellfish, fish and wildlife.

(3) For the purposes of listing waters under §130.7(b), the term “water quality standard applicable to such waters” and “applicable water quality standards” refer to those water quality standards established under section 303 of the Act, including numeric criteria, narrative criteria, waterbody uses, and antidegradation requirements.

(4) The list required under §§130.7(b)(1) and 130.7(b)(2) of this section shall include a priority ranking for all listed water quality-limited segments still requiring TMDLs, taking into account the severity of the pollution and the uses to be made of such waters and shall identify the pollutants causing or expected to cause violations of the applicable water quality standards. The priority ranking shall specifically include the identification of waters targeted for TMDL development in the next two years.

(5) Each State shall assemble and evaluate all existing and readily available water quality-related data and information to develop the list required by §§130.7(b)(1) and 130.7(b)(2). At a minimum “all existing and readily available water quality-related data and information” includes but is not limited to all of the existing and readily available data and information about the following categories of waters:

(i) Waters identified by the State in its most recent section 305(b) report as “partially meeting” or “not meeting” designated uses or as “threatened”;

(ii) Waters for which dilution calculations or predictive models indicate nonattainment of applicable water quality standards;

(iii) Waters for which water quality problems have been reported by local, state, or federal agencies; members of the public; or academic institutions. These organizations and groups should be actively solicited for research they may be conducting or reporting. For example, university researchers, the United States Department of Agriculture, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the United States Geological Survey, and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service are good sources of field data; and

(iv) Waters identified by the State as impaired or threatened in a nonpoint assessment submitted to EPA under section 319 of the CWA or in any updates of the assessment.

(6) Each State shall provide documentation to the Regional Administrator to support the State's determination to list or not to list its waters as required by §§130.7(b)(1) and 130.7(b)(2). This documentation shall be submitted to the Regional Administrator together with the list required by §§130.7(b)(1) and 130.7(b)(2) and shall include at a minimum:

(i) A description of the methodology used to develop the list; and

(ii) A description of the data and information used to identify waters, including a description of the data and information used by the State as required by §130.7(b)(5); and

(iii) A rationale for any decision to not use any existing and readily available data and information for any one of the categories of waters as described in §130.7(b)(5); and

(iv) Any other reasonable information requested by the Regional Administrator. Upon request by the Regional Administrator, each State must demonstrate good cause for not including a water or waters on the list. Good cause includes, but is not limited to, more recent or accurate data; more sophisticated water quality modeling; flaws in the original analysis that led to the water being listed in the categories in §130.7(b)(5); or changes in conditions, e.g., new control equipment, or elimination of discharges.

(c) Development of TMDLs and individual water quality based effluent limitations.

(1) Each State shall establish TMDLs for the water quality limited segments identified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, and in accordance with the priority ranking. For pollutants other than heat, TMDLs shall be established at levels necessary to attain and maintain the applicable narrative and numerical WQS with seasonal variations and a margin of safety which takes into account any lack of knowledge concerning the relationship between effluent limitations and water quality. Determinations of TMDLs shall take into account critical conditions for stream flow, loading, and water quality parameters.

(i) TMDLs may be established using a pollutant-by-pollutant or biomonitoring approach. In many cases both techniques may be needed. Site-specific information should be used wherever possible.

(ii) TMDLs shall be established for all pollutants preventing or expected to prevent attainment of water quality standards as identified pursuant to paragraph (b)(1) of this section. Calculations to establish TMDLs shall be subject to public review as defined in the State CPP.

(2) Each State shall estimate for the water quality limited segments still requiring TMDLs identified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the total maximum daily thermal load which cannot be exceeded in order to assure protection and propagation of a balanced, indigenous population of shellfish, fish and wildlife. Such estimates shall take into account the normal water temperatures, flow rates, seasonal variations, existing sources of heat input, and the dissipative capacity of the identified waters or parts thereof. Such estimates shall include a calculation of the maximum heat input that can be made into each such part and shall include a margin of safety which takes into account any lack of knowledge concerning the development of thermal water quality criteria for protection and propagation of a balanced, indigenous population of shellfish, fish and wildlife in the identified waters or parts thereof.

(d) Submission and EPA approval. (1) Each State shall submit biennially to the Regional Administrator beginning in 1992 the list of waters, pollutants causing impairment, and the priority ranking including waters targeted for TMDL development within the next two years as required under paragraph (b) of this section. For the 1992 biennial submission, these lists are due no later than October 22, 1992. Thereafter, each State shall submit to EPA lists required under paragraph (b) of this section on April 1 of every even-numbered year. For the year 2000 submission, a State must submit a list required under paragraph (b) of this section only if a court order or consent decree, or commitment in a settlement agreement dated prior to January 1, 2000, expressly requires EPA to take action related to that State's year 2000 list. For the year 2002 submission, a State must submit a list required under paragraph (b) of this section by October 1, 2002, unless a court order, consent decree or commitment in a settlement agreement expressly requires EPA to take an action related to that State's 2002 list prior to October 1, 2002, in which case, the State must submit a list by April 1, 2002. The list of waters may be submitted as part of the State's biennial water quality report required by §130.8 of this part and section 305(b) of the CWA or submitted under separate cover. All WLAs/LAs and TMDLs established under paragraph (c) for water quality limited segments shall continue to be submitted to EPA for review and approval. Schedules for submission of TMDLs shall be determined by the Regional Administrator and the State.

(2) The Regional Administrator shall either approve or disapprove such listing and loadings not later than 30 days after the date of submission. The Regional Administrator shall approve a list developed under §130.7(b) that is submitted after the effective date of this rule only if it meets the requirements of §130.7(b). If the Regional Administrator approves such listing and loadings, the State shall incorporate them into its current WQM plan. If the Regional Administrator disapproves such listing and loadings, he shall, not later than 30 days after the date of such disapproval, identify such waters in such State and establish such loads for such waters as determined necessary to implement applicable WQS. The Regional Administrator shall promptly issue a public notice seeking comment on such listing and loadings. After considering public comment and making any revisions he deems appropriate, the Regional Administrator shall transmit the listing and loads to the State, which shall incorporate them into its current WQM plan.

(e) For the specific purpose of developing information and as resources allow, each State shall identify all segments within its boundaries which it has not identified under paragraph (b) of this section and estimate for such waters the TMDLs with seasonal variations and margins of safety, for those pollutants which the Regional Administrator identifies under section 304(a)(2) as suitable for such calculation and for thermal discharges, at a level that would assure protection and propagation of a balanced indigenous population of fish, shellfish and wildlife. However, there is no requirement for such loads to be submitted to EPA for approval, and establishing TMDLs for those waters identified in paragraph (b) of this section shall be given higher priority.

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 57 FR 33049, July 24, 1992; 65 FR 17170, Mar. 31, 2000; 66 FR 53048, Oct. 18, 2001]

§130.8   Water quality report.

(a) Each State shall prepare and submit biennially to the Regional Administrator a water quality report in accordance with section 305(b) of the Act. The water quality report serves as the primary assessment of State water quality. Based upon the water quality data and problems identified in the 305(b) report, States develop water quality management (WQM) plan elements to help direct all subsequent control activities. Water quality problems identified in the 305(b) report should be analyzed through water quality management planning leading to the development of alternative controls and procedures for problems identified in the latest 305(b) report. States may also use the 305(b) report to describe ground-water quality and to guide development of ground-water plans and programs. Water quality problems identified in the 305(b) report should be emphasized and reflected in the State's WQM plan and annual work program under sections 106 and 205(j) of the Clean Water Act.

(b) Each such report shall include but is not limited to the following:

(1) A description of the water quality of all waters of the United States and the extent to which the quality of waters provides for the protection and propagation of a balanced population of shellfish, fish, and wildlife and allows recreational activities in and on the water.

(2) An estimate of the extent to which CWA control programs have improved water quality or will improve water quality for the purposes of paragraph (b)(1) of this section, and recommendations for future actions necessary and identifications of waters needing action.

(3) An estimate of the environmental, economic and social costs and benefits needed to achieve the objectives of the CWA and an estimate of the date of such achievement.

(4) A description of the nature and extent of nonpoint source pollution and recommendations of programs needed to control each category of nonpoint sources, including an estimate of implementation costs.

(5) An assessment of the water quality of all publicly owned lakes, including the status and trends of such water quality as specified in section 314(a)(1) of the Clean Water Act.

(c) States may include a description of the nature and extent of ground-water pollution and recommendations of State plans or programs needed to maintain or improve ground-water quality.

(d) In the years in which it is prepared the biennial section 305(b) report satisfies the requirement for the annual water quality report under section 205(j). In years when the 305(b) report is not required, the State may satisfy the annual section 205(j) report requirement by certifying that the most recently submitted section 305(b) report is current or by supplying an update of the sections of the most recently submitted section 305(b) report which require updating.

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 57 FR 33050, July 24, 1992]

§130.9   Designation and de-designation.

(a) Designation. Areawide planning agencies may be designated by the Governor in accordance with section 208(a) (2) and (3) of the Act or may self-designate in accordance with section 208(a)(4) of the Act. Such designations shall subject to EPA approval in accordance with section 208(a)(7) of the Act.

(b) De-designation. The Governor may modify or withdraw the planning designation of a designated planning agency other than an Indian tribal organization self-designated §130.6(c)(2) if:

(1) The areawide agency requests such cancellation; or

(2) The areawide agency fails to meet its planning requirements as specified in grant agreements, contracts or memoranda of understanding; or

(3) The areawide agency no longer has the resources or the commitment to continue water quality planning activities within the designated boundaries.

(c) Impact of de-designation. Once an areawide planning agency's designation has been withdrawn the State agency shall assume direct responsibility for continued water quality planning and oversight of implementation within the area.

(d) Designated management agencies (DMA). In accordance with section 208(c)(1) of the Act, management agencies shall be designated by the Governor in consultation with the designated planning agency. EPA shall approve such designations unless the DMA lacks the legal, financial and managerial authority required under section 208(c)(2) of the Act. Designated management agencies shall carry out responsibilities specified in Water Quality Management (WQM) plans. Areawide planning agencies shall monitor DMA activities in their area and recommend necessary plan changes during the WQM plan update. Where there is no designated areawide planning agency, States shall monitor DMA activities and make any necessary changes during the WQM plan update.

§130.10   State submittals to EPA.

(a) The following must be submitted regularly by the States to EPA:

(1) The section 305(b) report, in FY 84 and every two years thereafter, and the annual section 205(j) certification or update of the 305(b) water quality report; (Approved by OMB under the control number 2040-0071)

(2) The annual State work program(s) under sections 106 and 205(j) of the Act; and (Approved by OMB under the control number 2010-0004)

(3) Revisions or additions to water quality standards (WQS) (303(c)). (Approved by OMB under 2040-0049)

(b) The Act also requires that each State initially submit to EPA and revise as necessary the following:

(1) Continuing planning process (CPP) (303(e));

(2) Identification of water quality-limited waters still requiring TMDLs (section 303(d)), pollutants, and the priority ranking including waters targeted for TMDL development within the next two years as required under §130.7(b) in accordance with the schedule set for in §130.7(d)(1).

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0071)

(3) Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) (303(d)); and

(4) Water quality management (WQM) plan and certified and approved WQM plan updates (208, 303(e)). (Paragraph (b)(1), (4) approved by OMB under the control number 2010-0004).

(c) The form and content of required State submittals to EPA may be tailored to reflect the organization and needs of the State, as long as the requirements and purposes of the Act, this part and, where applicable, 40 CFR parts 29, 30, 33 and 35, subparts A and J are met. The need for revision and schedule of submittals shall be agreed to annually with EPA as the States annual work program is developed.

(d) Not later than February 4, 1989, each State shall submit to EPA for review, approval, and implementation—

(1) A list of those waters within the State which after the application of effluent limitations required under section 301(b)(2) of the CWA cannot reasonably be anticipated to attain or maintain (i) water quality standards for such waters reviewed, revised, or adopted in accordance with section 303(c)(2)(B) of the CWA, due to toxic pollutants, or (ii) that water quality which shall assure protection of public health, public water supplies, agricultural and industrial uses, and the protection and propagation of a balanced population of shellfish, fish and wildlife, and allow recreational activities in and on the water;

(2) A list of all navigable waters in such State for which the State does not expect the applicable standard under section 303 of the CWA will be achieved after the requirements of sections 301(b), 306, and 307(b) are met, due entirely or substantially to discharges from point sources of any toxic pollutants listed pursuant to section 307(a);

(3) For each segment of navigable waters included on such lists, a determination of the specific point source discharging any such toxic pollutant which is believed to be preventing or impairing such water quality and the amount of each such toxic pollutant discharged by each such source.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0152)

(4) For the purposes of listing waters under §130.10(d)(2), applicable standard means a numeric criterion for a priority pollutant promulgated as part of a state water quality standard. Where a state numeric criterion for a priority pollutant is not promulgated as part of a state water quality standard, for the purposes of listing waters “applicable standard” means the state narrative water quality criterion to control a priority pollutant (e.g., no toxics in toxic amounts) interpreted on a chemical-by-chemical basis by applying a proposed state cirterion, an explicit state policy or regulation, or an EPA national water quality criterion, supplemented with other relevant information.

(5) If a water meets either of the two conditions listed below the water must be listed under §130.10(d)(2) on the grounds that the applicable standard is not achieved or expected to be achieved due entirely or substantially to discharges from point sources.

(i) Existing or additional water quality-based limits on one or more point sources would result in the achievement of an applicable water quality standard for a toxic pollutant; or

(ii) The discharge of a toxic pollutant from one or more point sources, regardless of any nonpoint source contribution of the same pollutant, is sufficient to cause or is expected to cause an excursion above the applicable water quality standard for the toxic pollutant.

(6) Each state shall assemble and evaluate all existing and readily available water quality-related data and information and each state shall develop the lists required by paragraphs (d)(1), (2), and (3) of this section based upon this data and information. At a minimum, all existing and readily available water quality-related data and information includes, but is not limited to, all of the existing and readily available data about the following categories of waters in the state:

(i) Waters where fishing or shellfish bans and/or advisories are currently in effect or are anticipated.

(ii) Waters where there have been repeated fishkills or where abnormalities (cancers, lesions, tumors, etc.) have been observed in fish or other aquatic life during the last ten years.

(iii) Waters where there are restrictions on water sports or recreational contact.

(iv) Waters identified by the state in its most recent state section 305(b) report as either “partially achieving” or “not achieving” designated uses.

(v) Waters identified by the states under section 303(d) of the CWA as waters needing water quality-based controls.

(vi) Waters identified by the state as priority waterbodies. (State Water Quality Management plans often include priority waterbody lists which are those waters that most need water pollution control decisions to achieve water quality standards or goals.)

(vii) Waters where ambient data indicate potential or actual exceedances of water quality criteria due to toxic pollutants from an industry classified as a primary industry in appendix A of 40 CFR part 122.

(viii) Waters for which effluent toxicity test results indicate possible or actual exceedances of state water quality standards, including narrative “free from” water quality criteria or EPA water quality criteria where state criteria are not available.

(ix) Waters with primary industrial major dischargers where dilution analyses indicate exceedances of state narrative or numeric water quality criteria (or EPA water quality criteria where state standards are not available) for toxic pollutants, ammonia, or chlorine. These dilution analyses must be based on estimates of discharge levels derived from effluent guidelines development documents, NPDES permits or permit application data (e.g., Form 2C), Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs), or other available information.

(x) Waters with POTW dischargers requiring local pretreatment programs where dilution analyses indicate exceedances of state water quality criteria (or EPA water quality criteria where state water quality criteria are not available) for toxic pollutants, ammonia, or chlorine. These dilution analyses must be based upon data from NPDES permits or permit applications (e.g., Form 2C), Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs), or other available information.

(xi) Waters with facilities not included in the previous two categories such as major POTWs, and industrial minor dischargers where dilution analyses indicate exceedances of numeric or narrative state water quality criteria (or EPA water quality criteria where state water quality criteria are not available) for toxic pollutants, ammonia, or chlorine. These dilution analyses must be based upon estimates of discharge levels derived from effluent guideline development documents, NPDES permits or permit application data, Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs), or other available information.

(xii) Waters classified for uses that will not support the “fishable/swimmable” goals of the Clean Water Act.

(xiii) Waters where ambient toxicity or adverse water quality conditions have been reported by local, state, EPA or other Federal Agencies, the private sector, public interest groups, or universities. These organizations and groups should be actively solicited for research they may be conducting or reporting. For example, university researchers, the United States Department of Agriculture, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the United States Geological Survey, and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service are good sources of field data and research.

(xiv) Waters identified by the state as impaired in its most recent Clean Lake Assessments conducted under section 314 of the Clean Water Act.

(xv) Waters identified as impaired by nonpoint sources in the America's Clean Water: The States' Nonpoint Source Assessments 1985 (Association of State and Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators (ASIWPCA)) or waters identified as impaired or threatened in a nonpoint source assessment submitted by the state to EPA under section 319 of the Clean Water Act.

(xvi) Surface waters impaired by pollutants from hazardous waste sites on the National Priority List prepared under section 105(8)(A) of CERCLA.

(7) Each state shall provide documentation to the Regional Administrator to support the state's determination to list or not to list waters as required by paragraphs (d)(1), (d)(2) and (d)(3) of this section. This documentation shall be submitted to the Regional Administrator together with the lists required by paragraphs (d)(1), (d)(2), and (d)(3) of this section and shall include as a minimum:

(i) A description of the methodology used to develop each list;

(ii) A description of the data and information used to identify waters and sources including a description of the data and information used by the state as required by paragraph (d)(6) of this section;

(iii) A rationale for any decision not to use any one of the categories of existing and readily available data required by paragraph (d)(6) of this section; and

(iv) Any other information requested by the Regional Administrator that is reasonable or necessary to determine the adequacy of a state's lists. Upon request by the Regional Administrator, each state must demonstrate good cause for not including a water or waters on one or more lists. Good cause includes, but is not limited to, more recent or accurate data; more accurate water quality modeling; flaws in the original analysis that led to the water being identified in a category in §130.10(d)(6); or changes in conditions, e.g., new control equipment, or elimination of discharges.

(8) The Regional Administrator shall approve or disapprove each list required by paragraphs (d)(1), (d)(2), and (d)(3) of this section no later than June 4, 1989. The Regional Administrator shall approve each list required under paragraphs (d)(1), (d)(2), and (d)(3) of this section only if it meets the regulatory requirements for listing under paragraphs (d)(1), (d)(2), and (d)(3) of this section and if the state has met all the requirements of paragraphs (d)(6) and (d)(7) of this section.

(9) If a state fails to submit lists in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section or the Regional Administrator does not approve the lists submitted by such state in accordance with this paragraph, then not later than June 4, 1990, the Regional Administrator, in cooperation with such state, shall implement the requirements of CWA section 304(l) (1) and (2) in such state.

(10) If the Regional Administrator disapproves a state's decision with respect to one or more of the waters required under paragraph (d) (1), (2), or (3) of this section, or one or more of the individual control strategies required pursuant to section 304(l)(1)(D), then not later than June 4, 1989, the Regional Administrator shall distribute the notice of approval or disapproval given under this paragraph to the appropriate state Director. The Regional Administrator shall also publish a notice of availability, in a daily or weekly newspaper with state-wide circulation or in the Federal Register, for the notice of approval or disapproval. The Regional Administrator shall also provide written notice to each discharger identified under section 304(l)(1)(C), that EPA has listed the discharger under section 304(l)(1)(C). The notice of approval and disapproval shall include the following:

(i) The name and address of the EPA office that reviews the state's submittals.

(ii) A brief description of the section 304(l) process.

(iii) A list of waters, point sources and pollutants disapproved under this paragraph.

(iv) If the Regional Administrator determines that a state did not provide adequate public notice and an opportunity to comment on the lists prepared under this section, or if the Regional Administrator chooses to exercise his or her discretion, a list of waters, point sources, or pollutants approved under this paragraph.

(v) The name, address, and telephone number of the person at the Regional Office from whom interested persons may obtain more information.

(vi) Notice that written petitions or comments are due within 120 days.

(11) As soon as practicable, but not later than June 4, 1990, the Regional Office shall issue a response to petitions or comments received under paragraph (d)(10) of this section. Notice shall be given in the same manner as notice described in paragraph (d)(10) of this section, except for the following changes to the notice of approvals and disapprovals:

(i) The lists of waters, point sources and pollutants must reflect any changes made pursuant to comments or petitions received.

(ii) A brief description of the subsequent steps in the section 304(l) process shall be included.

[50 FR 1779, Jan. 11, 1985, as amended at 54 FR 258, Jan. 4, 1989; 54 FR 23897, June 2, 1989; 57 FR 33050, July 24, 1992]

§130.11   Program management.

(a) State agencies may apply for grants under sections 106, 205(j) and 205(g) to carry out water quality planning and management activities. Interstate agencies may apply for grants under section 106 to carry out water quality planning and management activities. Local or regional planning organizations may request 106 and 205(j) funds from a State for planning and management activities. Grant administrative requirements for these funds appear in 40 CFR parts 25, 29, 30, 33 and 35, subparts A and J.

(b) Grants under section 106 may be used to fund a wide range of activities, including but not limited to assessments of water quality, revision of water quality standards (WQS), development of alternative approaches to control pollution, implementation and enforcement of control measures and development or implementation of ground water programs. Grants under section 205(j) may be used to fund water quality management (WQM) planning activities but may not be used to fund implementation of control measures (see part 35, subpart A). Section 205(g) funds are used primarily to manage the wastewater treatment works construction grants program pursuant to the provisions of 40 CFR part 35, subpart J. A State may also use part of the 205(g) funds to administer approved permit programs under sections 402 and 404, to administer a statewide waste treatment management program under section 208(b)(4) and to manage waste treatment construction grants for small communities.

(c) Grant work programs for water quality planning and management shall describe geographic and functional priorities for use of grant funds in a manner which will facilitate EPA review of the grant application and subsequent evaluation of work accomplished with the grant funds. A State's 305(b) Report, WQM plan and other water quality assessments shall identify the State's priority water quality problems and areas. The WQM plan shall contain an analysis of alternative control measures and recommendations to control specific problems. Work programs shall specify the activities to be carried out during the period of the grant; the cost of specific activities; the outputs, for example, permits issued, intensive surveys, wasteload allocations, to be produced by each activity; and where applicable, schedules indicating when activities are to be completed.

(d) State work programs under sections 106, 205(j) and 205(g) shall be coordinated in a manner which indicates the funding from these grants dedicated to major functions, such as permitting, enforcement, monitoring, planning and standards, nonpoint source implementation, management of construction grants, operation and maintenance of treatment works, ground-water, emergency response and program management. States shall also describe how the activities funded by these grants are used in a coordinated manner to address the priority water quality problems identified in the State's water quality assessment under section 305(b).

(e) EPA, States, areawide agencies, interstate agencies, local and Regional governments, and designated management agencies (DMAs) are joint participants in the water pollution control program. States may enter into contractual arrangements or intergovernmental agreements with other agencies concerning the performance of water quality planning and management tasks. Such arrangements shall reflect the capabilities of the respective agencies and shall efficiently utilize available funds and funding eligibilities to meet Federal requirements commensurate with State and local priorities. State work programs under section 205(j) shall be developed jointly with local, Regional and other comprehensive planning organizations.

§130.12   Coordination with other programs.

(a) Relationship to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. In accordance with section 208(e) of the Act, no NPDES permit may be issued which is in conflict with an approved Water Quality Management (WQM) plan. Where a State has assumed responsibility for the administration of the permit program under section 402, it shall assure consistency with the WQM plan.

(b) Relationship to the municipal construction grants program. In accordance with sections 205(j), 216 and 303(e)(3)(H) of the Act, each State shall develop a system for setting priorities for funding construction of municipal wastewater treatment facilities under section 201 of the Act. The State, or the agency to which the State has delegated WQM planning functions, shall review each facility plan in its area for consistency with the approved WQM plan. Under section 208(d) of the Act, after a waste treatment management agency has been designated and a WQM plan approved, section 201 construction grant funds may be awarded only to those agencies for construction of treatment works in conformity with the approved WQM plan.

(c) Relationship to Federal activities—Each department, agency or instrumentality of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the Federal Government having jurisdiction over any property or facility or engaged in any activity resulting, or which may result, in the discharge or runoff of pollutants shall comply with all Federal, State, interstate and local requirements, administrative authority, and process and sanctions respecting the control and abatement of water pollution in the same manner and extent as any non-governmental entity in accordance with section 313 of the CWA.

§130.15   Processing application for Indian tribes.

The Regional Administrator shall process an application of an Indian Tribe submitted under §130.6(d) in a timely manner. He shall promptly notify the Indian Tribe of receipt of the application.

[54 FR 14360, Apr. 11, 1989, as amended at 59 FR 13818, Mar. 23, 1994]



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