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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 34: Education


PART 359—DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES


Contents

Subpart A—General

§359.1   What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?
§359.2   Who is eligible for assistance under this program?
§359.3   What regulations apply to this program?
§359.4   What definitions apply to this program?
§§359.5-359.9   [Reserved]

Subpart B—What Kinds of Activities Does the Secretary Assist Under This Program?

§359.10   What types of projects are authorized under this program?
§359.11   What activities must each recipient carry out under this program?
§§359.12-359.19   [Reserved]

Subpart C [Reserved]

Subpart D—How Does the Secretary Make a Grant?

§359.30   How is peer review conducted under this program?
§359.31   What selection criteria does the Secretary use in reviewing applications under this program?
§359.32   What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?
§§359.33-359.39   [Reserved]

Authority: 29 U.S.C. 762(b)(4), unless otherwise noted.

Source: 50 FR 16676, Apr. 26, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General

§359.1   What is the Special Projects and Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program?

This program provides assistance to establish innovative projects for the delivery, demonstration, and evaluation of comprehensive medical, vocational, and other rehabilitation services to meet the wide range of needs of individuals with spinal cord injuries.

(Authority: Sec. 204(b)(4); 29 U.S.C. 762(b)(4))

§359.2   Who is eligible for assistance under this program?

The agencies and organizations eligible to apply under this program are described in 34 CFR 350.2.

(Authority: Sec. 204(b)(4)(A); 29 U.S.C. 762(b)(4)(A))

[58 FR 49420, Sept. 22, 1993]

§359.3   What regulations apply to this program?

The regulations referenced in 34 CFR 350.3 apply to this program.

(Authority: Secs. 202 and 204; 29 U.S.C. 761a and 762)

§359.4   What definitions apply to this program?

The definitions listed in 34 CFR 350.4 apply to this program.

(Authority: Sec. 202(i)(1); 29 U.S.C. 761a(i)(1))

§§359.5-359.9   [Reserved]

Subpart B—What Kinds of Activities Does the Secretary Assist Under This Program?

§359.10   What types of projects are authorized under this program?

This program provides assistance for demonstration projects that—

(a) Provide comprehensive rehabilitation services to individuals with spinal cord injuries; and

(b) Conduct spinal cord research, including clinical research and the analysis of standardized data in collaboration with other related projects.

(Authority: Sec. 204(b)(4); 29 U.S.C. 762(b)(4))

§359.11   What activities must each recipient carry out under this program?

Each recipient, whether administering a project separately under this part or in coordination with other activities supported under title II of the Act, shall—

(a) Establish a multidisciplinary system of providing rehabilitation services specifically designed to meet the special needs of individuals with spinal cord injuries, including emergency medical services, acute care, vocational and other rehabilitation services, community and job placement, and long-term community follow up and health maintenance. The system must be established on an appropriate geographical basis that reflects patterns of patient flow, and must be administered in close coordination with similar programs of the Veterans Administration, the National Institutes of Health, and other public and private agencies and institutions where appropriate;

(b) Demonstrate and evaluate both the service and cost benefits of a regional service system to those individuals with spinal cord injuries who might be served within that system;

(c) Establish within the system a rehabilitation research environment for the achievement of new knowledge leading to the reduction and treatment of complications arising from spinal cord injury and the development of new techniques of medical management and rehabilitation;

(d) Demonstrate and evaluate the development and application of improved methods and equipment essential to the care, management, and rehabilitation of individuals with spinal cord injury;

(e) Demonstrate methods of community outreach and education for individuals with spinal cord injury in areas such as housing, transportation, recreation, employment, and other community activities; and

(f) Address the needs of individuals with spinal cord injuries from minority backgrounds;

(g) Participate as directed by the Secretary in national studies of the benefits of a spinal cord injury service system by contributing to a national database and by other means as required by the Secretary.

(Authority: Secs. 21(b)(6) and 204(b)(4); 29 U.S.C. 718b and 762(b)(4))

[50 FR 16676, Apr. 26, 1985, as amended at 58 FR 49420, Sept. 22, 1993]

§§359.12-359.19   [Reserved]

Subpart C [Reserved]

Subpart D—How Does the Secretary Make a Grant?

§359.30   How is peer review conducted under this program?

Peer review is conducted under this program in accordance with 34 CFR 350.30-350.32, using the selection criteria in §359.31.

(Authority: Sec. 202(e); 29 U.S.C. 761a(e))

§359.31   What selection criteria does the Secretary use in reviewing applications under this program?

The Secretary uses the criteria in this section to evaluate applications under this program. The maximum score for all the criteria is 100 points.

(a) Project design (20 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) There is a clear description of how the objectives of the project relate to the purpose of the program;

(2) The research is likely to produce new and useful information;

(3) The need and target population are adequately defined;

(4) The outcomes are likely to benefit the defined target population;

(5) The research hypotheses are sound; and

(6) The research methodology is sound in the sample design and selection, the data collection plan, the measurement instruments, and the data analysis plan.

(b) Service comprehensiveness (20 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) The services to be provided within the project are comprehensive in scope, and include emergency medical services, intensive and acute medical care, rehabilitation management, psychosocial and community reintegration, and follow up;

(2) A broad range of vocational and other rehabilitation services will be available to severely handicapped individuals within the project; and

(3) Services will be coordinated with those services provided by other appropriate community resources.

(c) Plan of operation (15 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) There is an effective plan of operation that ensures proper and efficient administration of the project;

(2) The applicant's planned use of its resources and personnel is likely to achieve each objective;

(3) Collaboration between institutions, if proposed, is likely to be effective; and

(4) There is a clear description of how the applicant will include eligible project participants who have been traditionally underrepresented, such as—

(i) Members of racial or ethnic minority groups;

(ii) Women;

(iii) Individuals with disabilities; and

(iv) The elderly.

(d) Quality of key personnel (10 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) The principal investigator and other key staff have adequate training or experience, or both, in spinal cord injury care and rehabilitation and demonstrate appropriate potential to conduct the proposed research, demonstration, training, development, or dissemination activity;

(2) The principal investigator and other key staff are familiar with pertinent literature or methods, or both;

(3) All the disciplines necessary to establish the multidisciplinary system described in §359.11(a) are effectively represented;

(4) Commitments of staff time are adequate for the project; and

(5) The applicant is likely, as part of its non-discriminatory employment practices, to encourage applications for employment from persons who are members of groups that traditionally have been underrepresented, such as—

(i) Members of racial or ethnic minority groups;

(ii) Women;

(iii) Individuals with disabilities; and

(iv) The elderly.

(e) Adequacy of resources (10 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) The facilities planned for use are adequate;

(2) The equipment and supplies planned for use are adequate; and

(3) The commitment of the applicant to provide administrative and other necessary support is evident.

(f) Budget/cost effectiveness (10 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) The budget for the project is adequate to support the activities;

(2) The costs are reasonable in relation to the objectives of the project; and

(3) The budget for subcontracts (if required) is detailed and appropriate.

(g) Dissemination/utilization (5 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) There is a clearly defined plan for dissemination and utilization of project findings;

(2) The research results are likely to become available to others working in the field;

(3) The means to disseminate and promote utilization by others are defined; and

(4) The utilization approach is likely to address the defined need.

(h) Evaluation plan (10 points). The Secretary reviews each application to determine to what degree—

(1) There is a mechanism to evaluate plans, progress and results;

(2) The evaluation methods and objectives are likely to produce data that are quantifiable; and

(3) The evaluation results, where relevant, are likely to be assessed in a service setting.

(Authority: Secs. 202(e) and 204(b)(4); 29 U.S.C. 761a(e) and 762(b)(4))

[50 FR 16676, Apr. 26, 1985, as amended at 58 FR 49420, Sept. 22, 1993]

§359.32   What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

In determining which applicants to fund under this program, the Secretary also considers the proposed location of any project in order to achieve, to the extent possible, a geographic distribution of projects.

(Authority: Sec. 204(b)(4)(C); 29 U.S.C. 762(b)(4)(C))

[52 FR 30066, Aug. 12, 1987]

§§359.33-359.39   [Reserved]



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