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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of October 22, 2014

Title 23Chapter ISubchapter G → Part 645


Title 23: Highways


PART 645—UTILITIES


Contents

Subpart A—Utility Relocations, Adjustments, and Reimbursement

§645.101   Purpose.
§645.103   Applicability.
§645.105   Definitions.
§645.107   Eligibility.
§645.109   Preliminary engineering.
§645.111   Right-of-way.
§645.113   Agreements and authorizations.
§645.115   Construction.
§645.117   Cost development and reimbursement.
§645.119   Alternate procedure.

Subpart B—Accommodation of Utilities

§645.201   Purpose.
§645.203   Applicability.
§645.205   Policy.
§645.207   Definitions.
§645.209   General requirements.
§645.211   State transportation department accommodation policies.
§645.213   Use and occupancy agreements (permits).
§645.215   Approvals.

Authority: 23 U.S.C. 101, 109, 111, 116, 123, and 315; 23 CFR 1.23 and 1.27; 49 CFR 1.48(b); and E.O. 11990, 42 26961 (May 24, 1977).

Editorial Note: Nomenclature changes to part 645 appear at 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000.

Subpart A—Utility Relocations, Adjustments, and Reimbursement

Source: 50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

§645.101   Purpose.

To prescribe the policies, procedures, and reimbursement provisions for the adjustment and relocation of utility facilities on Federal-aid and direct Federal projects.

§645.103   Applicability.

(a) The provisions of this regulation apply to reimbursement claimed by a State transportation department (STD) for costs incurred under an approved and properly executed transportation department (TD)/utility agreement and for payment of costs incurred under all Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)/utility agreements.

(b) Procedures on the accommodation of utilities are set forth in 23 CFR part 645, subpart B, Accommodation of Utilities.

(c) When the lines or facilities to be relocated or adjusted due to highway construction are privately owned, located on the owner's land, devoted exclusively to private use and not directly or indirectly serving the public, the provisions of the FHWA's right-of-way procedures in 23 CFR 710.203, apply. When applicable, under the foregoing conditions, the provisions of this regulation may be used as a guide to establish a cost-to-cure.

(d) The FHWA's reimbursement to the STD will be governed by State law (or State regulation) or the provisions of this regulation, whichever is more restrictive. When State law or regulation differs from this regulation, a determination shall be made by the STD subject to the concurrence of the FHWA as to which standards will govern, and the record documented accordingly, for each relocation encountered.

(e) For direct Federal projects, all references herein to the STD or TD are inapplicable, and it is intended that the FHWA be considered in the relative position of the STD or TD.

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 64 FR 71289, Dec. 21, 1999]

§645.105   Definitions.

For the purposes of this regulation, the following definitions shall apply:

Authorization—for Federal-aid projects authorization to the STD by the FHWA, or for direct Federal projects authorization to the utility by the FHWA, to proceed with any phase of a project. The date of authorization establishes the date of eligibility for Federal funds to participate in the costs incurred on that phase of work.

Betterment—any upgrading of the facility being relocated that is not attributable to the highway construction and is made solely for the benefit of and at the election of the utility.

Cost of relocation—the entire amount paid by or on behalf of the utility properly attributable to the relocation after deducting from that amount any increase in value of the new facility, and any salvage derived from the old facility.

Cost of Removal—the amount expended to remove utility property including the cost of demolishing, dismantling, removing, transporting, or otherwise disposing of utility property and of cleaning up to leave the site in a neat and presentable condition.

Cost of salvage—the amount expended to restore salvaged utility property to usable condition after its removal.

Direct Federal projects—highway projects such as projects under the Federal Lands Highways Program which are under the direct administration of the FHWA.

Indirect or overhead costs—those costs which are not readily identifiable with one specific task, job, or work order. Such costs may include indirect labor, social security taxes, insurance, stores expense, and general office expenses. Costs of this nature generally are distributed or allocated to the applicable job or work orders, other accounts and other functions to which they relate. Distribution and allocation is made on a uniform basis which is reasonable, equitable, and in accordance with generally accepted cost accounting practices.

Relocation—the adjustment of utility facilities required by the highway project. It includes removing and reinstalling the facility, including necessary temporary facilities, acquiring necessary right-of-way on the new location, moving, rearranging or changing the type of existing facilities and taking any necessary safety and protective measures. It shall also mean constructing a replacement facility that is both functionally equivalent to the existing facility and necessary for continuous operation of the utility service, the project economy, or sequence of highway construction.

Salvage value—the amount received from the sale of utility property that has been removed or the amount at which the recovered material is charged to the utility's accounts, if retained for reuse.

State transportation department—the transportation department of one of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, or Puerto Rico.

Transportation department(TD)—that department, commission, board, or official of any State or political subdivison thereof, charged by its law with the responsibility for highway administration.

Use and occupancy agreement—the document (written agreement or permit) by which the TD approves the use and occupancy of highway right-of-way by utility facilities or private lines.

Utility—a privately, publicly, or cooperatively owned line, facility or system for producing, transmitting, or distributing communications, cable television, power, electricity, light, heat, gas, oil, crude products, water, steam, waste, storm water not connected with highway drainage, or any other similar commodity, including any fire or police signal system or street lighting system, which directly or indirectly serves the public. The term utility shall also mean the utility company inclusive of any wholly owned or controlled subsidiary.

Work order system—a procedure for accumulating and recording into separate accounts of a utility all costs to the utility in connection with any change in its system or plant.

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.107   Eligibility.

(a) When requested by the STD, Federal funds may participate, subject to the provisions of §645.103(d) of this part and at the pro rata share applicable, in an amount actually paid by an TD for the costs of utility relocations. Federal funds may participate in safety corrective measures made under the provisions of §645.107(k) of this part. Federal funds may also participate for relocations necessitated by the actual construction of highway project made under one or more of the following conditions when:

(1) The STD certifies that the utility has the right of occupancy in its existing location because it holds the fee, an easement, or other real property interest, the damaging or taking of which is compensable in eminent domain,

(2) The utility occupies privately or publicly owned land, including public road or street right-of-way, and the STD certifies that the payment by the TD is made pursuant to a law authorizing such payment in conformance with the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 123, and/or

(3) The utility occupies publicy owned land, including public road and street right-of-way, and is owned by a public agency or political subdivision of the State, and is not required by law or agreement to move at its own expense, and the STD certifies that the TD has the legal authority or obligation to make such payments.

(b) On projects which the STD has the authority to participate in project costs, Federal funds may not participate in payments made by a political subdivision for relocation of utility facilities, other than those proposed under the provisions of §645.107(k) of this part, when State law prohibits the STD from making payment for relocation of utility facilities.

(c) On projects which the STD does not have the authority to participate in project costs, Federal funds may participate in payments made by a political subdivision for relocation of utility facilities necessitated by the actual construction of a highway project when the STD certifies that such payment is based upon the provisions of §645.107(a) of this part and does not violate the terms of a use and occupancy agreement, or legal contract, between the utility and the TD or for utility safety corrective measures under the provisions of §645.107(k) of this part.

(d) Federal funds are not eligible to participate in any costs for which the utility contributes or repays the TD, except for utilities owned by the political subdivision on projects which qualify under the provisions of §645.107(c) of this part in which case the costs of the utility are considered to be costs of the TD.

(e) The FHWA may deny Federal fund participation in any payments made by a TD for the relocation of utility facilities when such payments do not constitute a suitable basis for Federal fund participation under the provisions of title 23 U.S.C.

(f) The rights of any public agency or political subdivision of a State under contract, franchise, or other instrument or agreement with the utility, pertaining to the utility's use and occupancy of publicly owned land, including public road and street right-of-way, shall be considered the rights of the STD in the absence of State law to the contrary.

(g) In lieu of the individual certifications required by §645.107(a) and (c), the STD may file a statement with the FHWA setting forth the conditions under which the STD will make payments for the relocation of utility facilities. The FHWA may approve Federal fund participation in utility relocations proposed by the STD under the conditions of the statement when the FHWA has made an affirmative finding that such statement and conditions form a suitable basis for Federal fund participation under the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 123.

(h) Federal funds may not participate in the cost of relocations of utility facilities made solely for the benefit or convenience of a utility, its contractor, or a highway contractor.

(i) When the advance installation of new utility facilities crossing or otherwise occupying the proposed right-of-way of a planned highway project is underway, or scheduled to be underway, prior to the time such right-of-way is purchased by or under control of the TD, arrangements should be made for such facilities to be installed in a manner that will meet the requirements of the planned highway project. Federal funds are eligible to participate in the additional cost incurred by the utility that are attributable to, and in accommodation of, the highway project provided such costs are incurred subsequent to authorization of the work by the FHWA. Subject to the other provisions of this regulation, Federal participation may be approved under the foregoing circumstances when it is demonstrated that the action taken is necessary to protect the public interest and the adjustment of the facility is necessary by reason of the actual construction of the highway project.

(j) Federal funds are eligible to participate in the costs of preliminary engineering and allied services for utilities, the acquisition of replacement right-of-way for utilities, and the physical construction work associated with utility relocations. Such costs must be incurred by or on behalf of a utility after the date the work is included in an approved program and after the FHWA has authorized the STD to proceed in accordance with 23 CFR part 630, subpart A, Federal-Aid Programs Approval and Project Authorization.

(k) Federal funds may participate in projects solely for the purpose of implementing safety corrective measures to reduce the roadside hazards of utility facilities to the highway user. Safety corrective measures should be developed in accordance with the provisions of 23 CFR 645.209(k).

(Information collection requirements in paragraph (g) were approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2125-0515)

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 53 FR 24932, July 1, 1988]

§645.109   Preliminary engineering.

(a) As mutually agreed to by the TD and utility, and subject to the provisions of paragraph (b) of this section, preliminary engineering activities associated with utility relocation work may be done by:

(1) The TD's or utility's engineering forces;

(2) An engineering consultant selected by the TD, after consultation with the utility, the contract to be administered by the TD; or,

(3) An engineering consultant selected by the utility, with the approval of the TD, the contract to be administered by the utility.

(b) When a utility is not adequately staffed to pursue the necessary preliminary engineering and related work for the utility relocation, Federal funds may participate in the amount paid to engineers, architects, and others for required engineering and allied services provided such amounts are not based on a percentage of the cost of relocation. When Federal participation is requested by the STD in the cost of such services, the utility and its consultant shall agree in writing as to the services to be provided and the fees and arrangements for the services. Federal funds may participate in the cost of such services performed under existing written continuing contracts when it is demonstrated that such work is performed regularly for the utility in its own work and that the costs are reasonable.

(c) The procedures in 23 CFR part 172, Administration of Engineering and Design Related Service Contracts, may be used as a guide for reviewing proposed consultant contracts.

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 60 FR 34850, July 5, 1995; 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.111   Right-of-way.

(a) Federal participation may be approved for the cost of replacement right-of-way provided:

(1) The utility has the right of occupancy in its existing location beause it holds the fee, an easement, or another real property interest, the damaging or taking of which is compensable in eminent domain, or the acquisition is made in the interest of project economy or is necessary to meet the requirements of the highway project, and

(2) There will be no charge to the project for that portion of the utility's existing right-of-way being transferred to the TD for highway purposes.

(b) The utility shall determine and make a written valuation of the replacement right-of-way that it acquires in order to justify amounts paid for such right-of-way. This written valuation shall be accomplished prior to negotiation for acquisition.

(c) Acquisition of replacement right-of-way by the TD on behalf of a utility or acquisition of nonoperating real property from a utility shall be in accordance with the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (42 U.S.C. 4601 et seq.) and applicable right-of-way procedures in 23 CFR 710.203.

(d) When the utility has the right-of-occupancy in its existing location because it holds the fee, an easement, or another real property interest, and it is not necessary by reason of the highway construction to adjust or replace the facilities located thereon, the taking of and damage to the utility's real property, including the disposal or removal of such facilities, may be considered a right-of-way transaction in accordance with provisions of the applicable right-of-way procedures in 23 CFR 710.203.

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 64 FR 71289, Dec. 21, 1999]

§645.113   Agreements and authorizations.

(a) On Federal-aid and direct Federal projects involving utility relocations, the utility and the TD shall agree in writing on their separate responsibilities for financing and accomplishing the relocation work. When Federal participation is requested, the agreement shall incorporate this regulation by reference and designate the method to be used for performing the work (by contract or force account) and for developing relocation costs. The method proposed by the utility for developing relocation costs must be acceptable to both the TD and the FHWA. The preferred method for the development of relocation costs by a utility is on the basis of actual direct and related indirect costs accumulated in accordance with a work order accounting procedure prescribed by the applicable Federal or State regulatory body.

(b) When applicable, the written agreement shall specify the terms and amounts of any contribution or repayments made or to be made by the utility to the TD in connection with payments by the TD to the utility under the provisions of §645.107 of this regulation.

(c) The agreement shall be supported by plans, specifications when required, and itemized cost estimates of the work agreed upon, including appropriate credits to the project, and shall be sufficiently informative and complete to provide the TD and the FHWA with a clear description of the work required.

(d) When the relocation involves both work to be done at the TD's expense and work to be done at the expense of the utility, the written agreement shall state the share to be borne by each party.

(e) In the event there are changes in the scope of work, extra work or major changes in the planned work covered by the approved agreement, plans, and estimates, Federal participation shall be limited to costs covered by a modification of the agreement, a written change, or extra work order approved by the TD and the FHWA.

(f) When proposed utility relocation and adjustment work on a project for a specific utility company can be clearly defined and the cost can be accurately estimated, the FHWA may approve an agreement between the TD and the utility company for a lump-sum payment without later confirmation by audit of actual costs.

(g) Except as otherwise provided by §645.113(h), authorization by the FHWA to the STD to proceed with the physical relocation of a utility's facilities may be given after:

(1) The utility relocation work, or the right-of-way, or physical construction phase of the highway construction work is included in an approved Statewide transportation improvement program,

(2) The appropriate environmental evaluation and public hearing procedures required by 23 CFR part 771, Environmental Impact and Related Procedures, have been satisfied.

(3) The FHWA has reviewed and approved the plans, estimates, and proposed or executed agreements for the utility work and is furnished a schedule for accomplishing the work.

(h) The FHWA may authorize the physical relocation of utility facilities before the requirements of §645.113(g)(2) are satisfied when the relocation or adjustment of utility facilities meets the requirements of §645.107(i) of this regulation.

(i) Whenever the FHWA has authorized right-of-way acquisition under the hardship and protective buying provisions of 23 CFR 710.503, the FHWA may authorize the physical relocation of utility facilities located in whole or in part on such right-of-way.

(j) When all efforts by the TD and utility fail to bring about written agreement of their separate responsibilities under the provisions of this regulation, the STD shall submit its proposal and a full report of the circumstances to the FHWA. Conditional authorizations for the relocation work to proceed may be given by the FHWA to the STD with the understanding that Federal funds will not be paid for work done by the utility until the STD proposal has been approved by the FHWA.

(k) The FHWA will consider for approval any special procedure under State law, or appropriate administrative or judicial order, or under blanket master agreements with the utilities, that will fully accomplish all of the foregoing objectives and accelerate the advancement of the construction and completion of projects.

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 60 FR 34850, July 5, 1995; 64 FR 71289, Dec. 21, 1999; 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.115   Construction.

(a) Part 635, subpart B, of this title, Force Account Construction (justification required for force account work), states that it is cost-effective for certain utility adjustments to be performed by a utility with its own forces and equipment, provided the utility is qualified to perform the work in a satisfactory manner. This cost-effectiveness finding covers minor work on the utility's existing facilities routinely performed by the utility with its own forces. When the utility is not adequately staffed and equipped to perform such work with its own forces and equipment at a time convenient to and in coordination with the associated highway construction, such work may be done by:

(1) A contract awarded by the TD or utility to the lowest qualified bidder based on appropriate solicitation,

(2) Inclusion as part of the TD's highway construction contract let by the TD as agreed to by the utility,

(3) An existing continuing contract, provided the costs are reasonable, or

(4) A contract for low-cost incidental work, such as tree trimming and the like, awarded by the TD or utility without competitive bidding, provided the costs are reasonable.

(b) When it has been determined under part 635, subpart B, that the force account method is not the most cost-effective means for accomplishing the utility adjustment, such work is to be done under competitive bid contracts as described in §645.115(a) (1) and (2) or under an existing continuing contract provided it can be demonstrated this is the most cost-effective method.

(c) Costs for labor, materials, equipment, and other services furnished by the utility shall be billed by the utility directly to the TD. The special provisions of contracts let by the utility or the TD shall be explicit in this respect. The costs of force account work performed for the utility by the TD and of contract work performed for the utility under a contract let by the TD shall be reported separately from the costs of other force account and contract items on the highway project.

§645.117   Cost development and reimbursement.

(a) Developing and recording costs. (1) All utility relocation costs shall be recorded by means of work orders in accordance with an approved work order system except when another method of developing and recording costs, such as lump-sum agreement, has been approved by the TD and the FHWA. Except for work done under contracts, the individual and total costs properly reported and recorded in the utility's accounts in accordance with the approved method for developing such costs, or the lump-sum agreement, shall constitute the maximum amount on which Federal participation may be based.

(2) Each utility shall keep its work order system or other approved accounting procedure in such a manner as to show the nature of each addition to or retirement from a facility, the total costs thereof, and the source or sources of cost. Separate work orders may be issued for additions and retirements. Retirements, however, may be included with the construction work order provided that all items relating to retirements shall be kept separately from those relating to construction.

(3) The STD may develop, or work in concert with utility companies to develop, other acceptable costing methods, such as unit costs, to estimate and reimburse utility relocation expenditures. Such other methods shall be founded in generally accepted industry practices and be reasonably supported by recent actual expenditures. Unit costs should be developed periodically and supported annually by a maintained data base of relocation expenses. Development of any alternate costing method should consider the factors listed in paragraphs (b) through (g) of this section. Streamlining of the cost development and reimbursement procedures is encouraged so long as adequate accountability for Federal expenditures is maintained. Concurrence by the FHWA is required for any costing method used other than actual cost.

(b) Direct labor costs. (1) Salaries and wages, at actual or average rates, and related expenses paid by the utility to individuals for the time worked on the project are reimbursable when supported by adequate records. This includes labor associated with preliminary engineering, construction engineering, right-of-way, and force account construction.

(2) Salaries and expenses paid to individuals who are normally part of the overhead organization of the utility may be reimbursed for the time worked directly on the project when supported by adequate records and when the work performed by such individuals is essential to the project and could not have been accomplished as economically by employees outside the overhead organization.

(3) Amounts paid to engineers, architects and others for services directly related to projects may be reimbursed.

(c) Labor surcharges. (1) Labor surcharges include worker compensation insurance, public liability and property damage insurance, and such fringe benefits as the utility has established for the benefit of its employees. The cost of labor surcharges will be reimbursed at actual cost to the utility, or, at the option of the utility, average rates which are representative of actual costs may be used in lieu of actual costs if approved by the STD and the FHWA. These average rates should be adjusted at least once annually to take into account known anticipated changes and correction for any over or under applied costs for the preceding period.

(2) When the utility is a self-insurer, there may be reimbursement at experience rates properly developed from actual costs. The rates cannot exceed the rates of a regular insurance company for the class of employment covered.

(d) Overhead and indirect construction costs. (1) Overhead and indirect construction costs not charged directly to work order or construction accounts may be allocated to the relocation provided the allocation is made on an equitable basis. All costs included in the allocation shall be eligible for Federal reimbursement, reasonable, actually incurred by the utility, and consistent with the provisions of 48 CFR part 31.

(2) Costs not eligible for Federal reimbursement include, but are not limited to, the costs associated with advertising, sales promotion, interest on borrowings, the issuance of stock, bad debts, uncollectible accounts receivable, contributions, donations, entertainment, fines, penalties, lobbying, and research programs.

(3) The records supporting the entries for overhead and indirect construction costs shall show the total amount, rate, and allocation basis for each additive, and are subject to audit by representatives of the State and Federal Government.

(e) Material and supply costs. (1) Materials and supplies, if available, are to be furnished from company stock except that they may be obtained from other sources near the project site when available at a lower cost. When not available from company stock, they may be purchased either under competitive bids or existing continuing contracts under which the lowest available prices are developed. Minor quantities of materials and supplies and proprietary products routinely used in the utility's operation and essential for the maintenance of system compatibility may be excluded from these requirements. The utility shall not be required to change its existing standards for materials used in permanent changes to its facilities. Costs shall be determined as follows:

(i) Materials and supplies furnished from company stock shall be billed at the current stock prices for such new or used materials at time of issue.

(ii) Materials and supplies not furnished from company stock shall be billed at actual costs to the utility delivered to the project site.

(iii) A reasonable cost for plant inspection and testing may be included in the costs of materials and supplies when such expense has been incurred. The computation of actual costs of materials and supplies shall include the deduction of all offered discounts, rebates, and allowances.

(iv) The cost of rehabilitating rather than replacing existing utility facilities to meet the requirements of a project is reimbursable, provided this cost does not exceed replacement costs.

(2) Materials recovered from temporary use and accepted for reuse by the utility shall be credited to the project at prices charged to the job, less a considertion for loss in service life at 10 percent. Materials recovered from the permanent facility of the utility that are accepted by the utility for return to stock shall be credited to the project at the current stock prices of such used materials. Materials recovered and not accepted for reuse by the utility, if determined to have a net sale value, shall be sold to the highest bidder by the TD or utility following an opportunity for TD inspection and appropriate solicitation for bids. If the utility practices a system of periodic disposal by sale, credit to the project shall be at the going prices supported by records of the utility.

(3) Federal participation may be approved for the total cost of removal when either such removal is required by the highway construction or the existing facilities cannot be abandoned in place for aesthetic or safety reasons. When the utility facilities can be abandoned in place but the utility or highway constructor elects to remove and recover the materials, Federal funds shall not participate in removal costs which exceed the value of the materials recovered.

(4) The actual and direct costs of handling and loading materials and supplies at company stores or material yards, and of unloading and handling recovered materials accepted by the utility at its stores or material yards are reimbursable. In lieu of actual costs, average rates which are representative of actual costs may be used if approved by the STD and the FHWA. These average rates should be adjusted at least once annually to take into account known anticipated changes and correction for any over or under applied costs for the preceding period. At the option of the utility, 5 percent of the amounts billed for the materials and supplies issued from company stores and material yards or the value of recovered materials will be reimbursed in lieu of actual or average costs for handling.

(f) Equipment costs. The average or actual costs of operation, minor maintenance, and depreciation of utility-owned equipment may be reimbursed. Reimbursement for utility-owned vehicles may be made at average or actual costs. When utility-owned equipment is not available, reimbursement will be limited to the amount of rental paid (1) to the lowest qualified bidder, (2) under existing continuing contracts at reasonable costs, or (3) as an exception by negotiation when paragraph (f) (1) and (2) of this section are impractical due to project location or schedule.

(g) Transportation costs. (1) The utility's cost, consistent with its overall policy, of necessary employee transportation and subsistence directly attributable to the project is reimbursable.

(2) Reasonable cost for the movement of materials, supplies, and equipment to the project and necessary return to storage including the associated cost of loading and unloading equipment is reimbursable.

(h) Credits. (1) Credit to the highway project will be required for the cost of any betterments to the facility being replaced or adjusted, and for the salvage value of the materials removed.

(2) Credit to the highway project will be required for the accrued depreciation of a utility facility being replaced, such as a building, pumping station, filtration plant, power plant, substation, or any other similar operational unit. Such accrued depreciation is that amount based on the ratio between the period of actual length of service and total life expectancy applied to the original cost. Credit for accrued depreciation shall not be required for a segment of the utility's service, distribution, or transmission lines.

(3) No betterment credit is required for additions or improvements which are:

(i) Required by the highway project,

(ii) Replacement devices or materials that are of equivalent standards although not identical,

(iii) Replacement of devices or materials no longer regularly manufactured with next highest grade or size,

(iv) Required by law under governmental and appropriate regulatory commission code, or

(v) Required by current design practices regularly followed by the company in its own work, and there is a direct benefit to the highway project.

(4) When the facilities, including equipment and operating facilities, described in §645.117(h)(2) are not being replaced, but are being rehabilitated and/or moved, as necessitated by the highway project, no credit for accrued depreciation is needed.

(5) In no event will the total of all credits required under the provisions of this regulation exceed the total costs of adjustment exclusive of the cost of additions or improvements necessitated by the highway construction.

(i) Billings. (1) After the executed TD/utility agreement has been approved by the FHWA, the utility may be reimbursed through the STD by progress billings for costs incurred. Cost for materials stockpiled at the project site or specifically purchased and delivered to the utility for use on the project may also be reimbursed on progress billings following approval of the executed TD/utility agreement.

(2) The utility shall provide one final and complete billing of all costs incurred, or of the agreed-to lump-sum, within one year following completion of the utility relocation work, otherwise previous payments to the utility may be considered final, except as agreed to between the STD and the utility. Billings received from utilities more than one year following completion of the utility relocation work may be paid if the STD so desires, and Federal-aid highway funds may participate in these payments.

(3) All utility cost records and accounts relating to the project are subject to audit by representatives of the State and Federal Government for a period of 3 years from the date final payment has been received by the utility.

(Information collection requirements in paragraph (i) were approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2125-0159)

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 60 FR 34850, July 5, 1995; 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.119   Alternate procedure.

(a) This alternate procedure is provided to simplify the processing of utility relocations or adjustments under the provisions of this regulation. Under this procedure, except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the STD is to act in the relative position of the FHWA for reviewing and approving the arrangements, fees, estimates, plans, agreements, and other related matters required by this regulation as prerequisites for authorizing the utility to proceed with and complete the work.

(b) The scope of the STD's approval authority under the alternate procedure includes all actions necessary to advance and complete all types of utility work under the provisions of this regulation except in the following instances:

(1) Utility relocations and adjustments involving major transfer, production, and storage facilities such as generating plants, power feed stations, pumping stations and reservoirs.

(2) Utility relocations falling within the scope of §645.113 (h), (i), and (j), and §645.107(i) of this regulation.

(c) To adopt the alternate procedure, the STD must file a formal application for approval by the FHWA. The application must include the following:

(1) The STD's written policies and procedures for administering and processing Federal-aid utility adjustments. Those policies and procedures must make adequate provisions with respect to the following:

(i) Compliance with the requirements of this regulation, except as otherwise provided by §645.119(b), and the provisions of 23 CFR part 645, subpart B, Accommodation of Utilities.

(ii) Advance utility liaison, planning, and coordination measures for providing adequate lead time and early scheduling of utility relocation to minimize interference with the planned highway construction.

(iii) Appropriate administrative, legal, and engineering review and coordination procedures as needed to establish the legal basis of the TD's payment; the extent of eligibility of the work under State and Federal laws and regulations; the more restrictive payment standards under §645.103(d) of this regulation; the necessity of the proposed utility work and its compatibility with proposed highway improvements; and the uniform treatment of all utility matters and actions, consistent with sound management practices.

(iv) Documentation of actions taken in compliance with STD policies and the provisions of this regulation, shall be retained by the STD.

(2) A statement signed by the chief administrative officer of the STD certifying that:

(i) Federal-aid utility relocations will be processed in accordance with the applicable provisions of this regulation, and the STD's utility policies and procedures submitted under §645.119(c)(1).

(ii) Reimbursement will be requested only for those costs properly attributable to the proposed highway construction and eligible for participation under the provisions of this regulation.

(d) The STD's application and any changes to it will be submitted to the FHWA for review and approval.

(e) After the alternate procedure has been approved, the FHWA may authorize the STD to proceed with utility relocation on a project in accordance with the certification, subject to the following conditions:

(1) The utility work must be included in an approved program.

(2) The STD must submit a request in writing for such authorization. The request shall include a list of the utility relocations to be processed under the alternate procedure, along with the best available estimate of the total costs involved.

(f) The FHWA may suspend approval of the alternate procedure when any FHWA review discloses noncompliance with the certification. Federal funds will not participate in relocation costs incurred that do not comply with the requirements under §645.119(c)(1).

(Information collection requirements in paragraph (c) were approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2125-0533)

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

Subpart B—Accommodation of Utilities

Source: 50 FR 20354, May 15, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

§645.201   Purpose.

To prescribe policies and procedures for accommodating utility facilities and private lines on the right-of-way of Federal-aid or direct Federal highway projects.

§645.203   Applicability.

This subpart applies to:

(a) New utility installations within the right-of-way of Federal-aid or direct Federal highway projects,

(b) Existing utility facilities which are to be retained, relocated, or adjusted within the right-of-way of active projects under development or construction when Federal-aid or direct Federal highway funds are either being or have been used on the involved highway facility. When existing utility installations are to remain in place without adjustments on such projects the transportation department and utility are to enter into an appropriate agreement as discussed in §645.213 of this part,

(c) Existing utility facilities which are to be adjusted or relocated under the provisions of §645.209(k), and

(d) Private lines which may be permitted to cross the right-of-way of a Federal-aid or direct Federal highway project pursuant to State law and regulations and the provisions of this subpart. Longitudinal use of such right-of-way by private lines is to be handled under the provisions of 23 CFR 1.23(c).

§645.205   Policy.

(a) Pursuant to the provisions of 23 CFR 1.23, it is in the public interest for utility facilities to be accommodated on the right-of-way of a Federal-aid or direct Federal highway project when such use and occupancy of the highway right-of-way do not adversely affect highway or traffic safety, or otherwise impair the highway or its aesthetic quality, and do not conflict with the provisions of Federal, State or local laws or regulations.

(b) Since by tradition and practice highway and utility facilities frequently coexist within common right-of-way or along the same transportation corridors, it is essential in such situations that these public service facilities be compatibly designed and operated. In the design of new highway facilities consideration should be given to utility service needs of the area traversed if such service is to be provided from utility facilities on or near the highway. Similarly the potential impact on the highway and its users should be considered in the design and location of utility facilities on or along highway right-of-way. Efficient, effective and safe joint highway and utility development of transportation corridors is important along high speed and high volume roads, such as major arterials and freeways, particularly those approaching metropolitan areas where space is increasingly limited. Joint highway and utility planning and development efforts are encouraged on Federal-aid highway projects.

(c) The manner is which utilities cross or otherwise occupy the right-of-way of a direct Federal or Federal-aid highway project can materially affect the highway, its safe operation, aesthetic quality, and maintenance. Therefore, it is necessary that such use and occupancy, where authorized, be regulated by transportation departments in a manner which preserves the operational safety and the functional and aesthetic quality of the highway facility. This subpart shall not be construed to alter the basic legal authority of utilities to install their facilities on public highways pursuant to law or franchise and reasonable regulation by transportation departments with respect to location and manner of installation.

(d) When utilities cross or otherwise occupy the right-of-way of a direct Federal or Federal-aid highway project on Federal lands, and when the right-of-way grant is for highway purposes only, the utility must also obtain and comply with the terms of a right-of-way or other occupancy permit for the Federal agency having jurisdiction over the underlying land.

[50 FR 20354, May 15, 1985, as amended at 53 FR 2833, Feb. 2, 1988]

§645.207   Definitions.

For the purpose of this regulation, the following definitions shall apply:

Aesthetic quality—those desirable characteristics in the appearance of the highway and its environment, such as harmony between or blending of natural and manufactured objects in the environment, continuity of visual form without distracting interruptions, and simplicity of designs which are desirably functional in shape but without clutter.

Border area—the area between the traveled way and the right-of-way line.

Clear roadside policy—that policy employed by a transportation department to provide a clear zone in order to increase safety, improve traffic operations, and enhance the aesthetic quality of highways by designing, constructing and maintaining highway roadsides as wide, flat, and rounded as practical and as free as practical from natural or manufactured hazards such as trees, drainage structures, nonyielding sign supports, highway lighting supports, and utility poles and other ground-mounted structures. The policy should address the removal of roadside obstacles which are likely to be associated with accident or injury to the highway user, or when such obstacles are essential, the policy should provide for appropriate countermeasures to reduce hazards. Countermeasures include placing utility facilities at locations which protect out-of-control vehicles, using breakaway features, using impact attenuation devices, or shielding. In all cases full consideration shall be given to sound engineering principles and economic factors.

Clear zone—the total roadside border area starting at the edge of the traveled way, available for safe use by errant vehicles. This area may consist of a shoulder, a recoverable slope, a non-recoverable slope, and/or the area at the toe of a non-recoverable slope available for safe use by an errant vehicle. The desired width is dependent upon the traffic volumes and speeds, and on the roadside geometry. The current edition of the AASHTO “Roadside Design Guide” should be used as a guide for establishing clear zones for various types of highways and operating conditions. This publication is available for inspection and copying from the FHWA Washington Headquarters and all FHWA Division Offices as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7. Copies of current AASHTO publications are available for purchase from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Suite 225, 444 North Capitol Street, NW., Washington, D.C. 20001, or electronically at http://www.aashto.org.

Direct Federal highway projects—those active or completed highway projects such as projects under the Federal Lands Highways Program which are under the direct administration of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

Federal-aid highway projects—those active or completed highway projects administered by or through a State transportation department which involve or have involved the use of Federal-aid highway funds for the development, acquisition of right-of-way, construction or improvement of the highway or related facilities, including highway beautification projects under 23 U.S.C. 319, Landscaping and Scenic Enhancement.

Freeway—a divided arterial highway with full control of access.

Highway—any public way for vehicular travel, including the entire area within the right-of-way and related facilities constructed or improved in whole or in part with Federal-aid or direct Federal highway funds.

Transportation department—that department, agency, commission, board, or official of any State or political subdivision thereof, charged by its law with the responsibility for highway administration.

Private lines—privately owned facilities which convey or transmit the commodities outlined in the definition of utility facility of this section, but devoted exclusively to private use.

Right-of-way—real property, or interests therein, acquired, dedicated or reserved for the construction, operation, and maintenance of a highway in which Federal-aid or direct Federal highway funds are or have been involved in any stage of development. Lands acquired under 23 U.S.C. 319 shall be considered to be highway right-of-way.

State transportation department—the transportation department of one of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, or Puerto Rico.

Use and occupancy agreement—the document (written agreement or permit) by which the transportation department approves the use and occupancy of highway right-of-way by utility facilities or private lines.

Utility facility—privately, publicly or cooperatively owned line, facility, or system for producing, transmitting, or distributing communications, cable television, power, electricity, light, heat, gas, oil, crude products, water, steam, waste, storm water not connected with highway drainage, or any other similar commodity, including any fire or police signal system or street lighting system, which directly or indirectly serves the public. The term utility shall also mean the utility company inclusive of any substantially owned or controlled subsidiary. For the purposes of this part, the term includes those utility-type facilities which are owned or leased by a government agency for its own use, or otherwise dedicated solely to governmental use. The term utility includes those facilities used solely by the utility which are a part of its operating plant.

[50 FR 20345, May 15, 1985, as amended at 51 FR 16834, May 7, 1986; 53 FR 2833, Feb. 2, 1988; 55 FR 25828, June 25, 1990; 60 FR 34850, July 5, 1995; 61 FR 12022, Mar. 25, 1996; 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.209   General requirements.

(a) Safety. Highway safety and traffic safety are of paramount, but not of sole, importance when accommodating utility facilities within highway right-of-way. Utilities provide an essential public service to the general public. Traditionally, as a matter of sound economic public policy and law, utilities have used public road right-of-way for transmitting and distributing their services. The lack of sufficient right-of-way width to accommodate utilities outside the desirable clear zone, in and of itself, is not a valid reason to preclude utilities from occupying the highway right-of-way. However, due to the nature and volume of highway traffic, the effect of such joint use on the traveling public must be carefully considered by transportation departments before approval of utility use of the right-of-way of Federal-aid or direct Federal highway projects is given. Adjustments in the operating characteristics of the utility or the highway or other special efforts may be necessary to increase the compatibility of utility-highway joint use. The possibility of this joint use should be a consideration in establishing right-of-way requirements for highway projects. In any event, the design, location, and manner in which utilities use and occupy the right-of-way of Federal-aid or direct Federal highway projects must conform to the clear roadside policies for the highway involved and otherwise provide for a safe traveling environment as required by 23 U.S.C. 109(l)(1).

(b) New above ground installations. On Federal-aid or direct Federal highway projects, new above ground utility installations, where permitted, shall be located as far from the traveled way as possible, preferably along the right-of-way line. No new above ground utility installations are to be allowed within the established clear zone of the highway unless a determination has been made by the transportation department that placement underground is not technically feasible or is unreasonably costly and there are no feasible alternate locations. In exceptional situations when it is essential to locate such above ground utility facilities within the established clear zone of the highway, appropriate countermeasures to reduce hazards shall be used. Countermeasures include placing utility facilities at locations which protect or minimize exposure to out-of-control vehicles, using breakaway features, using impact attenuation devices, using delineation, or shielding.

(c) Installations within freeways. (1) Each State transportation department shall submit an accommodation plan in accordance with §§645.211 and 645.215 which addresses how the State transportation department will consider applications for longitudinal utility installations within the access control lines of a freeway. This includes utility installations within interchange areas which must be constructed or serviced by direct access from the main lanes or ramps. If a State transportation department elects to permit such use, the plan must address how the State transportation department will oversee such use consistent with this subpart, Title 23 U.S.C., and the safe and efficient use of the highways.

(2) Any accommodation plan shall assure that installations satisfy the following criteria:

(i) The effects utility installations will have on highway and traffic safety will be ascertained, since in no case shall any use be permitted which would adversely affect safety.

(ii) The direct and indirect environmental and economic effects of any loss of productive agricultural land or any productivity of any agricultural land which would result from the disapproval of the use of such right-of-way for accommodation of such utility facility will be evaluated.

(iii) These environmental and economic effects together with any interference with or impairment of the use of the highway in such right-of-way which would result from the use of such right-of-way for the accommodation of such utility facility will be considered.

(iv) [Reserved]

(v) A utility strip will be established along the outer edge of the right-of-way by locating a utility access control line between the proposed utility installation and the through roadway and ramps. Existing fences should be retained and, except along sections of freeways having frontage roads, planned fences should be located at the freeway right-of-way line. The State or political subdivision is to retain control of the utility strip right-of-way including its use by utility facilities. Service connections to adjacent properties shall not be permitted from within the utility strip.

(3) Nothing in this part shall be construed as prohibiting a transportation department from adopting a more restrictive policy than that contained herein with regard to longitudinal utility installations along freeway right-of-way and access for constructing and/or for servicing such installations.

(d) Uniform policies and procedures. For a transportation department to fulfill its responsibilities to control utility use of Federal-aid highway right-of-way within the State and its political subdivisions, it must exercise or cause to be exercised, adequate regulation over such use and occupancy through the establishment and enforcement of reasonably uniform policies and procedures for utility accommodation.

(e) Private lines. Because there are circumstances when private lines may be allowed to cross or otherwise occupy the right-of-way of Federal-aid projects, transportation departments shall establish uniform policies for properly controlling such permitted use. When permitted, private lines must conform to the provisions of this part and the provisions of 23 CFR 1.23(c) for longitudinal installations.

(f) Direct Federal highway projects. On direct Federal highway projects, the FHWA will apply, or cause to be applied, utility and private line accommodation policies similar to those required on Federal-aid highway projects. When appropriate, agreements will be entered into between the FHWA and the transportation department or other government agencies to ensure adequate control and regulation of use by utilities and private lines of the right-of-way on direct Federal highway projects.

(g) Projects where state lacks authority. On Federal-aid highway projects where the State transportation department does not have legal authority to regulate highway use by utilities and private lines, the State transportation department must enter into formal agreements with those local officials who have such authority. The agreements must provide for a degree of protection to the highway at least equal to the protection provided by the State transportation department's utility accommodation policy approved under the provisions of §645.215(b) of this part. The project agreement between the State transportation department and the FHWA on all such Federal-aid highway projects shall contain a special provision incorporating the formal agreements with the responsible local officials.

(h) Scenic areas. New utility installations, including those needed for highway purposes, such as for highway lighting or to serve a weigh station, rest area or recreation area, are not permitted on highway right-of-way or other lands which are acquired or improved with Federal-aid or direct Federal highway funds and are located within or adjacent to areas of scenic enhancement and natural beauty. Such areas include public park and recreational lands, wildlife and waterfowl refuges, historic sites as described in 23 U.S.C. 138, scenic strips, overlooks, rest areas and landscaped areas. The State transportation department may permit exceptions provided the following conditions are met:

(1) New underground or aerial installations may be permitted only when they do not require extensive removal or alteration of trees or terrain features visible to the highway user or impair the aesthetic quality of the lands being traversed.

(2) Aerial installations may be permitted only when:

(i) Other locations are not available or are unusually difficult and costly, or are less desirable from the standpoint of aesthetic quality,

(ii) Placement underground is not technically feasible or is unreasonably costly, and

(iii) The proposed installation will be made at a location, and will employ suitable designs and materials, which give the greatest weight to the aesthetic qualities of the area being traversed. Suitable designs include, but are not limited to, self-supporting armless, single-pole construction with vertical configuration of conductors and cable.

(3) For new utility installations within freeways, the provisions of paragraph (c) of this section must also be satisfied.

(i) Joint use agreements. When the utility has a compensable interest in the land occupied by its facilities and such land is to be jointly occupied and used for highway and utility purposes, the transportation department and utility shall agree in writing as to the obligations and responsibilities of each party. Such joint-use agreements shall incorporate the conditions of occupancy for each party, including the rights vested in the transportation department and the rights and privileges retained by the utility. In any event, the interest to be acquired by or vested in the transportation department in any portion of the right-of-way of a Federal-aid or direct Federal highway project to be vacated, used or occupied by utilities or private lines, shall be adequate for the construction, safe operation, and maintenance of the highway project.

(j) Traffic control plan. Whenever a utility installation, adjustment or maintenance activity will affect the movement of traffic or traffic safety, the utility shall implement a traffic control plan and utilize traffic control devices as necessary to ensure the safe and expeditious movement of traffic around the work site and the safety of the utility work force in accordance with procedures established by the transportation department. The traffic control plan and the application of traffic control devices shall conform to the standards set forth in the current edition of the “Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices” (MUTCD) and 23 CFR part 630, subpart J. This publication is available for inspection and copying from the FHWA Washington Headquarters and all FHWA Division Offices as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7.

(k) Corrective measures. When the transportation department determines that existing utility facilities are likely to be associated with injury or accident to the highway user, as indicated by accident history or safety studies, the transportation department shall initiate or cause to be initiated in consultation with the affected utilities, corrective measures to provide for a safer traffic environment. The corrective measures may include changes to utility or highway facilities and should be prioritized to maximum safety benefits in the most cost-effective manner. The scheduling of utility safety improvements should take into consideration planned utility replacement or upgrading schedules, accident potential, and the availability of resources. It is expected that the requirements of this paragraph will result in an orderly and positive process to address the identified utility hazard problems in a timely and reasonable manner with due regard to the effect of the corrective measures on both the utility consumer and the road user. The type of corrective measures are not prescribed. Any requests received involving Federal participation in the cost of adjusting or relocating utility facilities pursuant to this paragrpah shall be subject to the provisions of 23 CFR part 645, subpart A, Utility Relocations, Adjustments and Reimbursement, and 23 CFR part 924, Highway Safety Improvement Program.

(l) Wetlands. The installation of privately owned lines or conduits on the right-of-way of Federal-aid or direct Federal highway projects for the purpose of draining adjacent wetlands onto the highway right-of-way is considered to be inconsistent with Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, dated May 24, 1977, and shall be prohibited.

(m) Utility determination. In determining whether a proposed installation is a utility or not, the most important consideration is how the STD views it under its own State laws and/or regulations.

[50 FR 20354, May 15, 1985, as amended at 53 FR 2833, Feb. 2, 1988; 60 FR 34851, July 5, 1995; 65 FR 70311, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.211   State transportation department accommodation policies.

The FHWA should use the current editions of the AASHTO publications, “A Guide for Accommodating Utilities Within Highway Right-of-Way” and “Roadside Design Guide” to assist in the evaluation of adequacy of STD utility accommodation policies. These publications are available for inspection from the FHWA Washington Headquarters and all FHWA Division Offices as prescribed in 49 CFR part 7. Copies of current AASHTO publications are available for purchase from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Suite 225, 444 North Capitol Street NW., Washington, DC 20001, or electronically at http://www.aashto.org. At a minimum, such policies shall make adequate provisions with respect to the following:

(a) Utilities must be accommodated and maintained in a manner which will not impair the highway or adversely affect highway or traffic safety. Uniform procedures controlling the manner, nature and extent of such utility use shall be established.

(b) Consideration shall be given to the effect of utility installations in regard to safety, aesthetic quality, and the costs or difficulty of highway and utility construction and maintenance.

(c) The State transportation department's standards for regulating the use and occupancy of highway right-of-way by utilities must include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) The horizontal and vertical location requirements and clearances for the various types of utilities must be clearly stated. These must be adequate to ensure compliance with the clear roadside policies for the particular highway involved.

(2) The applicable provisions of government or industry codes required by law or regulation must be set forth or appropriately referenced, including highway design standards or other measures which the State transportation department deems necessary to provide adequate protection to the highway, its safe operation, aesthetic quality, and maintenance.

(3) Specifications for and methods of installation; requirements for preservation and restoration of highway facilities, appurtenances, and natural features and vegetation on the right-of-way; and limitations on the utility's activities within the right-of-way including installation within areas set forth by §645.209(h) of this part should be prescribed as necessary to protect highway interests.

(4) Measures necessary to protect traffic and its safe operation during and after installation of facilities, including control-of-access restrictions, provisions for rerouting or detouring traffic, traffic control measures to be employed, procedures for utility traffic control plans, limitations on vehicle parking and materials storage, protection of open excavations, and the like must be provided.

(5) A State transportation department may deny a utility's request to occupy highway right-of-way based on State law, regulation, or ordinances or the State transportation department's policy. However, in any case where the provisions of this part are to be cited as the basis for disapproving a utility's request to use and occupy highway right-of-way, measures must be provided to evaluate the direct and indirect environmental and economic effects of any loss of productive agricultural land or any impairment of the productivity of any agricultural land that would result from the disapproval. The environmental and economic effects on productive agricultural land together with the possible interference with or impairment of the use of the highway and the effect on highway safety must be considered in the decision to disapprove any proposal by a utility to use such highway right-of-way.

(d) Compliance with applicable State laws and approved State transportation department utility accommodation policies must be assured. The responsible State transportation department's file must contain evidence of the written arrangements which set forth the terms under which utility facilities are to cross or otherwise occupy highway right-of-way. All utility installations made on highway right-of-way shall be subject to written approval by the State transportation department. However, such approval will not be required where so provided in the use and occupancy agreement for such matters as utility facility maintenance, installation of service connections on highways other than freeways, or emergency operations.

(e) The State transportation department shall set forth in its utility accommodation plan detailed procedures, criteria, and standards it will use to evaluate and approve individual applications of utilities on freeways under the provisions of §645.209(c) of this part. The State transportation department also may develop such procedures, criteria and standards by class of utility. In defining utility classes, consideration may be given to distinguishing utility services by type, nature or function and their potential impact on the highway and its user.

(f) The means and authority for enforcing the control of access restrictions applicable to utility use of controlled access highway facilities should be clearly set forth in the State transportation department plan.

(Information collection requirements in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) were approved under control number 2125-0522, and paragraph (d) under control number 2125-0514)

[50 FR 20354, May 15, 1985, as amended at 53 FR 2834, Feb. 2, 1988; 55 FR 25828, June 25, 1990; 65 FR 70312, Nov. 22, 2000]

§645.213   Use and occupancy agreements (permits).

The written arrangements, generally in the form of use and occupancy agreements setting forth the terms under which the utility is to cross or otherwise occupy the highway right-of-way, must include or incorporate by reference:

(a) The transportation department standards for accommodating utilities. Since all of the standards will not be applicable to each individual utility installation, the use and occupancy agreement must, as a minimum, describe the requirements for location, construction, protection of traffic, maintenance, access restriction, and any special conditions applicable to each installation.

(b) A general description of the size, type, nature, and extent of the utility facilities being located within the highway right-of-way.

(c) Adequate drawings or sketches showing the existing and/or proposed location of the utility facilities within the highway right-of-way with respect to the existing and/or planned highway improvements, the traveled way, the right-of-way lines and, where applicable, the control of access lines and approved access points.

(d) The extent of liability and responsibilities associated with future adjustment of the utilities to accommodate highway improvements.

(e) The action to be taken in case of noncompliance with the transportation department's requirements.

(f) Other provisions as deemed necessary to comply with laws and regulations.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2125-0522)

§645.215   Approvals.

(a) Each State transportation department shall submit a statement to the FHWA on the authority of utilities to use and occupy the right-of-way of State highways, the State transportation department's power to regulate such use, and the policies the State transportation department employs or proposes to employ for accommodating utilities within the right-of-way Federal-aid highways under its jurisdiction. Statements previously submitted and approved by the FHWA need not be resubmitted provided the statement adequately addresses the requirements of this part. When revisions are deemed necessary the changes to the previously approved statement may be submitted separately to the FHWA for approval. The State transportation department shall include similar information on the use and occupancy of such highways by private lines where permitted. The State shall identify those areas, if any, of Federal-aid highways within its borders where the State transportation department is without legal authority to regulate use by utilities. The statement shall address the nature of the formal agreements with local officials required by §645.209(g) of this part. It is expected that the statements required by this part or necessary revisions to previously submitted and approved statements will be submitted to FHWA within 1 year of the effective date of this regulation.

(b) Upon determination by the FHWA that a State transportation department's policies satisfy the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 109, 111, and 116, and 23 CFR 1.23 and 1.27, and meet the requirements of this regulation, the FHWA will approve their use on Federal-aid highway projects in that State

(c) Any changes, additions or deletions the State transportation department proposes to the approved policies are subject to FHWA approval.

(d) When a utility files a notice or makes an individual application or request to a STD to use or occupy the right-of-way of a Federal-aid highway project, the STD is not required to submit the matter to the FHWA for prior concurrence, except when the proposed installation is not in accordance with this regulation or with the STD's utility accommodation policy approved by the FHWA for use on Federal-aid highway projects.

(e) The State transportation department's practices under the policies or agreements approved under §645.215(b) of this part shall be periodically reviewed by the FHWA.

(Information collection requirements in paragraph (a) were approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2125-0514)

[50 FR 20354, May 15, 1985, as amended at 53 FR 2834, Feb. 2, 1988; 60 FR 34851, July 5, 1995; 65 FR 70312, Nov. 22, 2000]



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