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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of July 21, 2014

Title 19: Customs Duties


PART 101—GENERAL PROVISIONS


Contents
§101.0   Scope.
§101.1   Definitions.
§101.2   Authority of Customs officers.
§101.3   Customs service ports and ports of entry.
§101.4   Entry and clearance of vessels at Customs stations.
§101.5   CBP preclearance offices in foreign countries.
§101.6   Hours of business.
§101.7   Customs seal.
§101.8   Identification cards.
§101.9   Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 6 U.S.C. 203; 19 U.S.C. 2 & note, 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States), 1623, 1624, 1646a.

Section 101.3 and 101.4 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1 and 58b;

Section 101.5 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1629;

Section 101.9 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1411-1414.

Source: T.D. 77-241, 42 FR 54937, Oct. 12, 1977, unless otherwise noted.

§101.0   Scope.

This part sets forth general regulations governing the authority of Customs officers, and the location of Customs ports of entry, service ports and Customs stations. It further sets forth regulations concerning the entry and clearance of vessels at Customs stations and a listing of Customs preclearance offices in foreign countries. In addition, this part contains provisions concerning the hours of business of Customs offices, the Customs seal, and the identification cards issued to Customs officers and employees.

[T.D. 77-241, 42 FR 54937, Oct. 12, 1977, as amended by T.D. 99-27, 64 FR 13675, Mar. 22, 1999]

§101.1   Definitions.

As used in this chapter, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated unless either the context in which they are used requires a different meaning or a different definition is prescribed for a particular part or portion thereof:

Business day. A “business day” means a weekday (Monday through Friday), excluding national holidays as specified in §101.6(a).

Customs station. A “Customs station” is any place, other than a port of entry, at which Customs officers or employees are stationed, under the authority contained in article IX of the President's Message of March 3, 1913 (T.D. 33249), to enter and clear vessels, accept entries of merchandise, collect duties, and enforce the various provisions of the Customs and navigation laws of the United States.

Customs territory of the United States. “Customs territory of the United States” includes only the States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

Date of entry. The “date of entry” or “time of entry” of imported merchandise shall be the effective time of entry of such merchandise, as defined in §141.68 of this chapter.

Date of exportation. “Date of exportation” or “time of exportation” shall be as defined in §152.1(c) of this chapter.

Date of importation. “Date of importation” means, in the case of merchandise imported otherwise than by vessel, the date on which the merchandise arrives within the Customs territory of the United States. In the case of merchandise imported by vessel, “date of importation” means the date on which the vessel arrives within the limits of a port in the United States with intent then and there to unlade such merchandise.

Duties. “Duties” means Customs duties and any internal revenue taxes which attach upon importation.

Entry or withdrawal for consumption. “Entry or withdrawal for consumption” means entry for consumption or withdrawal from warehouse for consumption.

Exportation. “Exportation” means a severance of goods from the mass of things belonging to this country with the intention of uniting them to the mass of things belonging to some foreign country. The shipment of merchandise abroad with the intention of returning it to the United States with a design to circumvent provisions of restriction or limitation in the tariff laws or to secure a benefit accruing to imported merchandise is not an exportation. Merchandise of foreign origin returned from abroad under these circumstances is dutiable according to its nature, weight, and value at the time of its original arrival in this country.

Importer. “Importer” means the person primarily liable for the payment of any duties on the merchandise, or an authorized agent acting on his behalf. The importer may be:

(1) The consignee, or

(2) The importer of record, or

(3) The actual owner of the merchandise, if an actual owner's declaration and superseding bond has been filed in accordance with §141.20 of this chapter, or

(4) The transferee of the merchandise, if the right to withdraw merchandise in a bonded warehouse has been transferred in accordance with subpart C of part 144 of this chapter.

Port and port of entry. The terms “port” and “port of entry” refer to any place designated by Executive Order of the President, by order of the Secretary of the Treasury, or by Act of Congress, at which a Customs officer is authorized to accept entries of merchandise to collect duties, and to enforce the various provisions of the Customs and navigation laws. The terms “port” and “port of entry” incorporate the geographical area under the jurisdiction of a port director. (The Customs ports in the Virgin Islands, although under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Treasury, have their own Customs laws (48 U.S.C. 1406(i)). These ports, therefore, are outside the Customs territory of the United States and the ports thereof are not “ports of entry” within the meaning of these regulations).

Principal field officer. A “principal field officer” is an officer in the field service whose immediate supervisor is located at Customs Service Headquarters.

Service port. The term “service port” refers to a Customs location having a full range of cargo processing functions, including inspections, entry, collections, and verification.

Shipment. “Shipment” means the merchandise described on the bill of lading or other document used to file or support entry, or in the oral declaration when applicable.

[T.D. 77-241, 42 FR 54937, Oct. 12, 1977, as amended by T.D. 84-213, 49 FR 41170, Oct. 19, 1984; 49 FR 44867, Nov. 9, 1984; T.D. 94-51, 59 FR 30294, June 13, 1994; T.D. 95-77, 60 FR 50011, Sept. 27, 1995; T.D. 99-57, 64 FR 40987, July 28, 1999]

§101.2   Authority of Customs officers.

(a) Supremacy of delegated authority. Action taken by any person pursuant to authority delegated to him by the Secretary of the Treasury, whether directly or by subdelegation, shall be valid despite the existence of any statute or regulation, including any provision of this chapter, which provides that such action shall be taken by some other person. Any person acting under such delegated authority shall be deemed to have complied with any statute or regulation which provides or indicates that it shall be the duty of some other person to perform such action.

(b) Consolidation of functions. Any reorganization of the Customs Service or consolidation of the functions of two or more persons into one office which results in the failure of a designated Customs officer to perform an action required by statute or regulation, shall not invalidate the performance of that action by any other Customs officer.

(c) Customs supervision. Whenever anything is required by the regulations in this chapter or by any provision of the customs or navigation laws to be done or maintained under the supervision of Customs officers, such supervision shall be carried out as prescribed in the regulations of this chapter or by instructions from the Secretary of the Treasury or the Commissioner of Customs in particular cases. In the absence of a governing regulation or instruction, supervision shall be direct and continuous or by such occasional verification as the principal Customs field officer shall direct if such officer shall determine that less intensive supervision will ensure proper enforcement of the law and protection of the revenue. Nothing in this section shall be deemed to warrant any failure to direct and furnish required supervision or to excuse any failure of a party in interest to comply with prescribed procedures for obtaining any required supervision.

[T.D. 77-241, 42 FR 54937, Oct. 12, 1977, as amended by T.D. 98-22, 63 FR 11825, Mar. 11, 1998]

§101.3   Customs service ports and ports of entry.

(a) Designation of Customs field organization. The Deputy Assistant Secretary (Regulatory, Tariff, and Trade Enforcement), pursuant to authority delegated by the Secretary of the Treasury, is authorized to establish, rearrange or consolidate, and to discontinue Customs ports of entry as the needs of the Customs Service may require.

(b) List of Ports of Entry and Service Ports. The following is a list of Customs Ports of Entry and Service Ports. Many of the ports listed were created by the President's message of March 3, 1913, concerning a reorganization of the Customs Service pursuant to the Act of August 24, 1912 (37 Stat. 434; 19 U.S.C. 1). Subsequent orders of the President or of the Secretary of the Treasury which affected these ports, or which created (or subsequently affected) additional ports, are cited following the name of the ports.

(1) Customs ports of entry. A list of Customs ports of entry by State and the limits of each port are set forth below:

Ports of entryLimits of port
Alabama
Birmingham
HuntsvilleT.D. 83-196.
MobileIncluding territory described in T.D. 76-259.
Alaska
AlcanT.D. 71-210.
AnchorageT.D.s 55295 and 68-50.
Dalton CacheT.D. 79-74.
FairbanksE.O. 8064, Mar. 9, 1939 (4 FR 1191).
Juneau
KetchikanIncluding territory described in T.D. 74-100.
KodiakT.D. 98-65.
SitkaIncluding territory described in T.D. 55609.
Skagway
ValdezIncluding territory described in T.D. 79-201.
WrangellIncluding territory described in T.D. 56420.
Arizona
DouglasIncluding territory described in E.O. 9382, Sept. 25, 1943 (8 FR 13083).
LukevilleE.O. 10088, Dec. 3, 1949 (14 FR 7287).
Naco
NogalesIncluding territory described in T.D. 77-285.
PhoenixT.D. 71-103.
San LuisE.O. 5322, Apr. 9, 1930.
SasabeE.O. 5608, Apr. 22, 1931.
TucsonIncluding territory described in T.D. 89-102.
Arkansas
Little Rock-North Little RockT.D. 70-146. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
California
AndradeE.O. 4780, Dec. 13, 1927.
Calexico
Eureka
FresnoIncluding territory described in T.D. 74-18.
Los Angeles-Long BeachIncluding territory described in T.D. 78-130.
Port HuenemeT.D. 92-10.
Port San LuisT.D. 35546.
SacramentoCBP Dec. 06-23.
San DiegoT.D. 85-163.
+ San Francisco-OaklandCBP Dec. 06-23.
San Jose95-80
TecateE.O. 4780, Dec. 13, 1927.
Colorado
DenverT.D. 80-180.
Connecticut
BridgeportIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-224.
HartfordIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-224.
New HavenIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-224.
New LondonIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-224.
Delaware
WilmingtonIncluded in the Consolidated Port of the Delaware River and Bay described in T.D. 96-4.
District of Columbia
WashingtonIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-67.
Florida
Fernandina BeachIncluding St. Mary's, GA; T.D. 53033.
Fort MyersT.D. 99-9
JacksonvilleT.D. 69-45.
Key WestIncluding territory described in T.D. 53994.
MiamiIncluding territory described in T.D. 53514.
OrlandoT.D. 76-306.
Orlando-Sanford AirportT.D. 97-64.
Panama CityE.O. 3919, Nov. 1, 1923.
Pensacola
Port CanaveralIncluding territory described in T.D. 66-212.
Port EvergladesE.O. 5770, Dec. 31, 1931; including territory described in T.D. 53514. Mail: Fort Lauderdale, FL.
Port ManateeT.D. 88-14.
St. PetersburgE.O. 7928, July 14, 1938 (3 FR 1749); including territory described in T.D. 53994.
TampaIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-91.
West Palm BeachE.O. 4324, Oct. 15, 1925; including territory described in T.D. 53514.
Georgia
AtlantaIncluding territory described in T.D. 55548.
BrunswickIncluding territory described in T.D. 86-162.
Fernandina Beach, FLIncluding St. Mary's, GA; T.D. 53033.
SavannahIncluding territory described in E.O. 8367, Mar. 5, 1940 (5 FR 985).
Hawaii
HiloT.D. 95-11.
HonoluluIncluding territory described in T.D. 90-59.
KahuluiT.D. 95-11.
Nawiliwili-Port AllenE.O. 4385, Feb. 25, 1926; including territory described in T.D. 56424.
Idaho
BoisePub.L. 98-573; T.D. 85-22.
Eastport
Porthill
Illinois
+ ChicagoIncluding territory described in CBP Dec. 04-24.
Davenport, IA-Moline and Rock Island, ILT.D.s 86-76 and 89-10.
PeoriaIncluding territory described in T.D.72-130.
RockfordCBP Dec. 05-38.
Indiana
Cincinnati, OH-Lawrenceburg, INConsolidated port, T.D. 84-91.
IndianapolisCBP Dec. 13-13.
Owensboro, KY-Evansville, INConsolidated port, T.D. 84-91.
Iowa
Davenport,IA-Moline and Rock Island, ILT.D.s 86-76 and 89-10.
Des MoinesT.D. 75-104.
Kansas
WichitaT.D. 74-93.
Kentucky
LouisvilleIncluding territory described in T.D. 77-232.
Owensboro, KY-Evansville, INConsolidated port, T.D. 84-91.
Louisiana
Baton RougeE.O. 5993, Jan. 13, 1933; including territory described in T.D.s 53514 and 54381. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
GramercyT.D. 82-93.
Lake CharlesE.O. 5475, Nov. 3, 1930; including territory described in T.D. 54137.
Morgan CityT.D. 54682; including territory described in T.D.s 66-266 and 94-77. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
New OrleansE.O. 5130, May 29, 1929; including territory described in T.D. 74-206. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
Shreveport-Bossier CityIncluding territory described in T.D. 86-145.
Maine
BangorIncluding Brewer, ME, E.O. 9297, Feb. 1, 1943 (8 FR 1479).
Bar HarborIncluding Mount Desert Island, the city of Ellsworth, and the townships of Hancock, Sullivan, Sorrento, Gouldsboro, and Winter Harbor and Trenton, E.O. 4572, Jan. 27, 1927, and T.D. 78-130.
BathIncluding Booth Bay and Wiscasset, E.O. 4356, Dec. 15, 1925.
BelfastIncluding Searsport, E.O. 6754, June 28, 1934.
BridgewaterE.O. 8079, Apr. 4, 1939 (4 FR 1475).
CalaisIncluding townships of Calais, Robbinston, and Baring, E.O. 6284, Sept. 13, 1933.
EastportIncluding Lubec and Cutler, E.O. 4296, Aug. 26, 1925.
Fort Fairfield
Fort Kent
HoultonE.O. 4156, Feb. 14, 1925.
JackmanIncluding townships of Jackman, Sandy Bay, Bald Mountain, Holeb, Attean, Lowelltown, Dennistown, and Moose River, T.D. 54683.
JonesportIncluding towns (townships) of Beals, Jonesboro, Roque Bluffs, and Machiasport, E.O. 4296, Aug. 26, 1925; E.O. 8695, Feb. 25, 1941 (6 FR 1187).
Limestone
Madawaska
PortlandIncluding territory described in CBP Dec. 03-08.
Portsmouth, N.HIncluding Kittery, ME.
Rockland
Van Buren
Vanceboro
Maryland
Annapolis
BaltimoreIncluding territory described in T.D. 68-123.
CambridgeE.O. 3888, Aug. 13, 1923; Crisfield.
Massachusetts
BostonIncluding territory and waters adjacent thereto described in T.D. 56493.
Fall RiverIncluding territory described in T.D. 54476.
Gloucester
LawrenceE.O. 5444, Sept. 16, 1930; E.O. 10088, Dec. 3, 1949 (14 FR 7287); including territory described in T.D. 71-12.
New Bedford
Plymouth
SalemIncluding Beverly, Marblehead, and Lynn; including Peabody, E.O. 9207, July 29, 1942 (7 FR 5931).
SpringfieldT.D. 69-189.
Worcester
Michigan
Battle CreekT.D. 72-233.
DetroitIncluding territory described in E.O. 9073, Feb. 25, 1942 (7 FR 1588), and T.D. 53738.
Grand RapidsT.D. 77-4.
Marinette, WIIncluding Menominee, MI.
MuskegonE.O. 8315, Dec. 22, 1939 (4 FR 4941); including territory described in T.D. 56230.
Port HuronIncluding territory described in T.D. 87-117.
Saginaw-Bay City-FlintConsolidated port, T.D. 79-74; including territory described in T.D. 82-9.
Sault Ste. MarieIncluding territory described in T.D. 79-74.
Minnesota
BaudetteE.O. 4422, Apr. 19, 1926.
Duluth, MN and Superior, WIIncluding territory described in T.D. 55904.
Grand PortageT.D. 56073.
International Falls-RanierIncluding territory described in T.D. 66-246.
Minneapolis-St. PaulIncluding territory described in T.D. 69-15.
PinecreekE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
RoseauE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
Warroad
Mississippi
GreenvilleT.D. 73-325. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
Gulfport
PascagoulaIncluding territory described in T.D. 86-68.
VicksburgT.D. 72-123; including territory described in T.D. 93-32. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
Missouri
Kansas CityIncluding Kansas City, KS and North Kansas City, MO, E.O. 8528, Aug. 27, 1940 (5 FR 3403); including territory described in T.D. 67-56.
Spirit of St. Louis AirportIncluding territory described in T.D. 97-7.
SpringfieldIncluding all territory within Greene and Christian Counties, T.D. 84-84.
St. Joseph
St. LouisCBP Dec. 09-16.
Montana
ButteT.D. 73-121.
Del BonitaE.O. 7947, Aug. 9, 1938 (3 FR 1965); Mail: Cut Bank, MT.
Great Falls
MorganE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245); Mail: Loring, MT.
OpheimE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
PieganE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245); Mail: Babb, MT.
RaymondE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
RoosvilleE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245); Mail: Eureka, MT.
ScobeyE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
Sweetgrass
TurnerE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
WhitlashE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
Nebraska
OmahaIncluding territory described in T.D. 73-228.
Nevada
Las VegasIncluding territory described in T.D. 79-74.
RenoIncluding territory described in T.D. 73-56.
New Hampshire
PortsmouthIncluding Kittery, ME.
New Jersey
Camden, Gloucester City, and SalemIncluded in the Consolidated Port of the Delaware River and Bay described in T.D. 96-4.
Perth Amboy
New Mexico
AlbuquerqueIncluding territory described in T.D. 74-304.
Columbus
Santa TeresaT.D. 94-34.
New York
Albany
Alexandria BayIncluding territory described in E.O. 10042, Mar. 10, 1949 (14 FR 1155).
Buffalo-Niagara FallsT.D. 56512.
Cape Vincent
Champlain-Rouses PointIncluding territory described in T.D. 67-68.
Clayton
MassenaT.D. 54834.
+ New YorkIncluding territory described in E.O. 4205, Apr. 15, 1925 (T.D. 40809).
Ogdensburg
Oswego
Rochester
Sodus Point
Syracuse
Trout RiverConsolidated port includes Chateaugay and Fort Covington, T.D. 83-253.
Utica
North Carolina
Beaufort-Morehead CityIncluding territory described in T.D. 87-76.
CharlotteT.D. 56079.
DurhamE.O. 4876, May 3, 1928; including territory described in E.O. 9433, Apr. 4, 1944 (9 FR 3761), and T.D. 82-9.
ReidsvilleE.O. 5159, July 18, 1929; including territory described in E.O. 9433, Apr. 6, 1944 (9 FR 3761).
WilmingtonIncluding townships of Northwest, Wilmington, and Cape Fear, E.O. 7761, Dec. 3, 1937 (2 FR 2679); including territory described in E.O. 10042, Mar. 10, 1949 (14 FR 1155).
Winston-SalemIncluding territory described in T.D. 87-64.
North Dakota
AmbroseE.O. 5835, April 13, 1932.
Antler
CarburyE.O. 5137, June 17, 1929.
DunseithE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
FargoCBP Dec. 03-09.
FortunaE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
Hannah
Hansboro
MaidaE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
Neche
NoonanE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
NorthgateT.D. 37386, T.D. 37439
PembinaCBP Dec. 06-15.
Portal
Sarles
Sherwood
St. JohnE.O. 5835, Apr. 13, 1932.
Walhalla
WesthopeE.O. 4236, June 1, 1925.
Ohio
Ashtabula/ConneautConsolidated port, T.D. 77-232.
Cincinnati, OH-Lawrenceburg, INConsolidated port, T.D. 84-91.
ClevelandIncluding territory described in T.D. 77-232; consolidated port, T.D. 87-123.
ColumbusCBP Dec. 09-35.
DaytonCBP Dec. 09-19.
Toledo-SanduskyConsolidated port, T.D. 84-89.
Oklahoma
Oklahoma CityIncluding territory described in T.D. 66-132.
TulsaT.D. 69-142.
Oregon
AstoriaIncluding territory described in T.D. 73-338.
Coos BayE.O. 4094, Oct. 28, 1924; E.O. 5193, Sept. 14, 1929; E.O. 5445, Sept. 16, 1930; E.O. 9533, Mar. 23, 1945 (10 FR 3173).
Newport
Portland
Pennsylvania
ChesterIncluded in the Consolidated Port of the Delaware River and Bay described in T.D. 96-4.
ErieIncluding territory described in T.D. 77-5.
HarrisburgT.D. 71-233.
Lehigh ValleyT.D. 93-75.
PhiladelphiaIncluded in the Consolidated Port of the Delaware River and Bay described in T.D. 96-4.
PittsburghIncluding territory described in T.D. 67-197.
Wilkes-Barre/ScrantonT.D. 75-64.
Puerto Rico
AguadillaT.D. 22305.
Fajardo
Guanica
HumacaoIncluding territory described in T.D. 70-157.
JobosE.O. 9162, May 13, 1942 (7 FR 3569).
MayaguezT.D. 22305.
PonceIncluding territory described in T.D. 54017.
San JuanIncluding territory described in T.D. 54017.
Rhode Island
Newport
ProvidenceIncluding territory described in T.D. 67-3.
South Carolina
CharlestonIncluding territory described in T.D. 76-142.
ColumbiaIncluding all territory in Richland and Lexington Counties, T.D. 82-239.
Georgetown
Greenville-SpartanburgT.D. 70-148.
South Dakota
Sioux FallsT.D. 96-3.
Tennessee
Chattanooga(Restated in T.D. 84-126).
KnoxvilleT.D. 75-128. (Restated in T.D. 84-126).
MemphisCBP Dec. 04-22.
Nashville(Restated in T.D. 84-126).
Tri-Cities, TN/VACBP Dec. 06-14.
Texas
AmarilloT.D. 75-129.
AustinT.D. 81-170.
Beaumont, Orange, Port Arthur, SabineConsolidated port, T.D. 74-231; including territory described in T.D. 81-160.
BrownsvilleIncluding territory described in T.D. 79-254.
Corpus ChristiE.O. 8288, Nov. 22, 1939 (4 FR 4691), and territory described in T.D. 78-130.
Dallas-Fort WorthT.D. 73-297; T.D. 79-232; T.D. 81-170.
Del Rio
Eagle PassIncluding territory described in T.D. 91-93.
El PasoT.D. 54407, including territory described in T.D. 78-221.
FabensE.O. 4869, May 1, 1928.
FreeportE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
HidalgoT.D. 85-164.
+ Houston-GalvestonConsolidated port includes territory lying within corporate limits of both Houston and Galveston, and remaining territory in Harris and Galveston Counties, T.D.s 81-160 and 82-15.
LaredoIncluding territory described in T.D. 90-69.
LubbockT.D. 76-79.
Port Lavaca-Point ComfortT.D. 56115.
PresidioE.O. 2702, Sept. 7, 1917.
ProgresoT.D. 85-164.
Rio Grande CityIncluding territory described in T.D. 92-43.
RomaE.O. 4830, Mar. 14, 1928.
San Antonio
Utah
Salt Lake CityT.D. 69-76.
Vermont
Beecher Falls
BurlingtonIncluding town of South Burlington, T.D. 54677.
Derby Line
Highgate Springs/AlburgE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245); includes territory described in T.D. 77-165.
NortonT.D. 73-249.
Richford
St. AlbansIncluding township of St. Albans, E.O. 3925, Nov. 13, 1923; E.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245); T.D. 77-165.
Virginia
Alexandria, VAT.D. 68-67.
Front RoyalT.D. 89-63.
New River ValleyCBP Dec. 06-10.
Norfolk-Newport NewsConsolidated port includes waters and shores of Hampton Roads.
Richmond-PetersburgConsolidated port, T.D. 68-179.
Virgin Islands, U.S.
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas
Christiansted, St. Croix
Coral Bay, St. John
Cruz Bay, St. John
Frederiksted, St. Croix
Washington
AberdeenIncluding territory described in T.D.s 56229, 79-169, and 84-90.
BlaineE.O. 5835, Apr. 13, 1932.
BoundaryT.D. 67-65.
Danville
Ferry
FrontierT.D. 67-65.
Laurier
LongviewIncluding territory described in T.D. 73-338.
LyndenE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
Metaline FallsE.O. 7632, June 15, 1937 (2 FR 1245).
NighthawkT.D. 39882
OrovilleE.O. 5206, Oct. 11, 1929.
Point RobertsT.D. 78-272.
Puget SoundConsolidated port includes Seattle, Anacortes, Bellingham, Everett, Friday Harbor, Neah Bay, Olympia, Port Angeles, Port Towsend, and Tacoma, T.D. 00-35.
Spokane
Sumas
West Virginia
CharlestonT.D. 73-170 and including territory described in T.D. 73-212.
Wisconsin
Ashland
Duluth, MN and Superior, WIIncluding territory described in T.D. 55904.
Green BayCBP Dec. 13-2.
Manitowoc
MarinetteIncluding Menominee, MI.
MilwaukeeIncluding territory described in T.D. 72-105.
RacineIncluding city of Kenosha and townships of Mount Pleasant and Somers, T.D. 54884.
Sheboygan

+ Indicates Drawback unit/office.

(2) Customs service ports. A list of Customs service ports and the States in which they are located is set forth below:

StateService ports
AlabamaMobile.
AlaskaAnchorage.
ArizonaNogales.
CaliforniaLos Angeles.
   LAX.
   San Diego.
   San Francisco.
ColoradoDenver.
FloridaMiami.
   Tampa.
GeorgiaSavannah.
HawaiiHonolulu.
IllinoisChicago.
LouisianaNew Orleans.
MainePortland.
MarylandBaltimore.
MassachusettsBoston.
MichiganDetroit.
MinnesotaDuluth.
   Minneapolis.
MissouriSt. Louis.
MontanaGreat Falls.
New JerseyNew York/Newark.
New YorkBuffalo.
   Champlain.
   JFK.
   New York/Newark.
North CarolinaCharlotte.
North DakotaPembina.
OhioCleveland.
OregonPortland.
PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia.
Puerto RicoSan Juan.
Rhode IslandProvidence.
South CarolinaCharleston.
TexasDallas.
   El Paso.
   Houston.
   Laredo.
VermontSt. Albans.
VirginiaDulles.
   Norfolk.
Virgin IslandsCharlotte Amalie.
WashingtonBlaine.
   Seattle.
WisconsinMilwaukee.

[T.D. 95-77, 60 FR 50011, Sept. 27, 1995]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §101.3, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§101.4   Entry and clearance of vessels at Customs stations.

(a) Entry at Customs station. A vessel shall not be entered or cleared at a Customs station, or any other place that is not a port of entry, unless entry or clearance is authorized by the director of the port under whose jurisdiction the station or place falls pursuant to the provisions of section 447, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1447).

(b) Authorization to enter. Authorization to enter or be cleared at a Customs station shall be granted by the director of the port under whose jurisdiction the station or place falls provided the port director is notified in advance of the arrival of the vessel concerned and the following conditions are met:

(1) Such Customs supervision as may be necessary can be provided.

(2) All applicable Customs and navigation laws and regulations are complied with.

(3) The owner, master or agent of a vessel sought to be entered at a Customs station reimburses the Government for the salary and expenses of the Customs officer or employee stationed at or sent to such Customs station or other place which is not a port of entry for services rendered in connection with the entry or clearance of such vessel, and

(4) Except as otherwise provided by these regulations, the Government is reimbursed by the interested parties for the expenses, including any per diem allowed in lieu of subsistence, but not the salary of a Customs officer or employee for services rendered in connection with the entry or delivery of merchandise.

(c) Customs stations designated. The Customs stations and the ports of entry having supervision thereof are listed below:

Customs stationSupervisory port of entry
Alaska
BarrowFairbanks.
Dutch HarborAnchorage.
EagleAlcan.
Fort YukonFairbanks.
HainesDalton Cache.
HyderKetchikan.
Kaktovik (Barter Island)Fairbanks.
Kenai (Nikiski)Anchorage.
NorthwayAlcan.
PelicanJuneau.
PetersburgWrangell.
California
CampoTecate.
Otay MesaSan Diego.
San YsidroSan Diego.
Colorado
Colorado SpringsDenver.
Delaware
LewesPhiladelphia, PA.
Florida
Fort PierceWest Palm Beach.
Green Cove SpringsJacksonville.
Port St. JoePanama City.
Indiana
Fort WayneIndianapolis.
Maine
BucksportBelfast.
Coburn GoreJackman.
DaaquamJackman.
EastonFort Fairfield.
EstcourtFort Kent.
Forest CityHoulton.
HamlinVan Buren.
Maryland
SalisburyBaltimore.
Massachusetts
ProvincetownPlymouth.
Michigan
AlpenaSaginaw-Bay City-Flint.
DetourSault Ste. Marie.
EscanabaSault Ste. Marie.
Grand HavenMuskegon.
HoughtonSault Ste. Marie.
MarquetteSault Ste. Marie.
Rogers CitySaginaw-Bay City-Flint.
Minnesota
Crane LakeDuluth, MN-Superior, WI.
ElyDuluth, MN-Superior, WI.
LancasterNoyes.
Oak IslandWarroad.
Mississippi
BiloxiMobile, AL.
Montana
Wild HorseGreat Falls.
Willow CreekGreat Falls.
New Jersey
Atlantic CityPhiladelphia-Chester, PA and Wilmington, DE.
Port NorrisPhiladelphia-Chester, PA and Wilmington, DE.
TuckertonPhiladelphia-Chester, PA and Wilmington, DE, PA.
New York
Cannons CornersChamplain-Rouses Point.
ChurubuscoTrout River.
Jamieson's LineTrout River.
New Hampshire
PittsburgBeecher Falls, VT.
MonticelloHoulton, ME.
OrientHoulton, ME.
Ste. AurelieJackman, ME.
St. PamphileJackman, ME.
New Mexico
Antelope Wells (Mail: Hachita, NM)Columbus, NM.
North Dakota
Grand ForksPembina.
MinotPembina.
Ohio
AkronCleveland.
Fairport HarborAshtabula/Conneaut.
LorainSandusky.
Marblehead-LakesideSandusky.
Put-in-BaySandusky.
Oklahoma
MuskogeeTulsa.
Texas
Amistad DamDel Rio.
BoquillasPresidio.
Falcon DamRoma.
Fort HancockFabens.
Los EbanosRio Grande City.
MarathonEl Paso.
Vermont
Beebe PlaineDerby Line.
CanaanBeecher Falls.
East RichfordRichford.
NewportDerby Line.
North TroyDerby Line.
West BerkshireRichford.

(d) Temporary Customs stations. Customs stations may be designated for a temporary time only, to provide Customs facilities where needed because of certain large-scale operations. Because these designations change from time to time they are not listed. However, current information as to the existence of such stations may be obtained from the local port director.

[T.D. 77-241, 42 FR 54937, Oct. 12, 1977]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §101.4, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§101.5   CBP preclearance offices in foreign countries.

Listed below are the preclearance offices in foreign countries where CBP officers are located. A Director, Preclearance, located in the Office of Field Operations at CBP Headquarters, is the responsible CBP officer exercising supervisory control over all preclearance offices.

Country CBP office
ArubaOrangestad.
The BahamasFreeport.
Nassau.
BermudaKindley Field.
CanadaCalgary, Alberta.
   Edmonton, Alberta.
   Halifax, Nova Scotia.
   Montreal, Quebec.
   Ottawa, Ontario.
   Toronto, Ontario.
   Vancouver, British Columbia.
   Winnipeg, Manitoba.
IrelandDublin.
Shannon.

[CBP Dec. 11-08, 76 FR 22805, Apr. 25, 2011]

§101.6   Hours of business.

Except as specified in paragraphs (a) through (g) of this section, each CBP office shall be open for the transactions of general CBP business between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. on all days of the year:

(a) Saturdays, Sundays and national holidays. In addition to Saturdays, Sundays, and any other calendar day designated as a holiday by Federal statute or Executive Order, CBP offices shall be closed on the following national holidays:

(1) The first day of January.

(2) The third Monday of January.

(3) The third Monday of February.

(4) The last Monday of May.

(5) The fourth day of July.

(6) The first Monday of September.

(7) The second Monday of October.

(8) The eleventh day of November.

(9) The fourth Thursday of November.

(10) The twenty-fifth day of December.

If a holiday falls on Saturday, the day immediately preceding such Saturday will be observed. If a holiday falls on Sunday, the day immediately following such Sunday will be observed. (5 U.S.C. 6103(b)(1)); (E.O. No. 11582, Jan. 1, 1971; 34 FR 2957; 3 CFR Ch. 11)

(b) Local conditions requiring different hgurs. If, because of local conditions, different but equivalent hours are required to maintain adequate service, such hours shall be observed provided the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection approves them and provided further that a notice of business hours is prominently displayed at the principal entrance and in each public room of the CBP office.

(c) Fixing of hours. At each port or station where there is no full-time CBP employee, the port director shall fix the hours during which the CBP office will be open for the transaction of general CBP business. Notice of such hours shall be prominently displayed at the principal entrance of the office.

(d) State and local holidays. Each CBP office shall be open for the transaction of business on all State and local holidays occurring on days other than Saturdays, Sundays, and national holidays listed in paragraph (a) of this section. The appropriate principal field officer may excuse any employee(s) without charge to leave when a state or local holiday interferes with the performance of his work in a CBP office.

(e) Services performed outside a CBP office. CBP services required to be performed outside a CBP office shall be furnished between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (or between the corresponding hours at ports where different but equivalent hours are required for the maintenance of adequate service) on all days when the CBP office is open for the transaction of general CBP business.

(f) CBP services not within prescribed hours. Where there is a regularly recurring need for CBP services outside the hours prescribed in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section and the volume and duration of the required services are uniformly such as to require, of themselves or in immediately consecutive combination with other essential CBP activities of the port, the full time of one or more CBP employees, the necessary number of regular tours of duty to furnish such services on all days of the year except Sundays and national holidays may be established with the approval of the Commissioner of CBP.

(g) CBP services furnished private interests. Other than as specified in this section. CBP services shall be furnished private interests only in accordance with the provisions of §24.16 of this chapter.

[T.D. 77-241, 42 FR 54937, Oct. 12, 1977, as amended by T.D. 82-145, 47 FR 35478, Aug. 16, 1982; T.D. 95-77, 60 FR 50019, Sept. 27, 1995; CBP Dec. 08-25, 73 FR 40726, July 16, 2008]

§101.7   Customs seal.

(a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department of the Treasury surrounded by an outer circle in which appear the words “Treasury” at the top and “U.S. Customs Service” at the bottom.

(b) Use of the Customs seal. The Customs seal currently in official use, including the dies, rolls, plates, and like devices now in the possession of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, shall continue to be equally effective as the official seal of the United States Customs Service and shall continue to be so used by each Customs officer and employee having possession of the seal until that particular device requires replacing and is replaced. Use of the United States Customs seal shall be restricted in the following manner:

(1) The Customs seal of the United States shall be impressed upon all official documents requiring the impress of a seal. It shall be impressed upon all marine documents and landing certificates, certificates of weight, gauge, or measure, and similar classes of documents for outside interests.

(2) The impress of the seal is not necessary on documents passing within the Customs Service nor shall the seal be used in the manner of a notary seal to indicate authority to administer oaths.

§101.8   Identification cards.

Each Customs employee shall be issued an appropriate identification card with that employee's photograph and signature, signed by the appropriate issuing officer.

§101.9   Test programs or procedures; alternate requirements.

(a) General testing. For purposes of conducting a test program or procedure designed to evaluate the effectiveness of new technology or operational procedures regarding the processing of passengers, vessels, or merchandise, the Commissioner of CBP may impose requirements different from those specified in the CBP Regulations, but only to the extent that such different requirements do not affect the collection of the revenue, public health, safety, or law enforcement. The imposition of any such different requirements will be subject to the following conditions:

(1) Defined purpose. The test is limited in scope, time, and application to such relief as may be necessary to facilitate the conduct of a specified program or procedure;

(2) Prior publication requirement. Whenever a particular test allows for deviation from any regulatory requirements, notice will be published in the Federal Register not less than thirty days prior to implementing such test, followed by publication in the Customs Bulletin. The notice will invite public comments concerning the methodology of the test program or procedure, and inform interested members of the public of the eligibility criteria for voluntary participation in the test and the basis for selecting participants.

(b) NCAP testing. For purposes of conducting an approved test program or procedure designed to evaluate planned components of the National Customs Automation Program (NCAP), as described in section 411(a)(2) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1411), the Commissioner of CBP may impose requirements different from those specified in the CBP Regulations, but only to the extent that such different requirements do not affect the collection of the revenue, public health, safety, or law enforcement. In addition to the requirement of paragraph (a)(1) of this section, the imposition of any such different requirements will be subject to the following conditions:

(1) Prior publication requirement. For tests affecting the NCAP, notice will be published in the Federal Register not less than thirty days prior to implementing such test, followed by publication in the Customs Bulletin. The notice will invite public comments concerning any aspect of the test program or procedure, and inform interested members of the public of the eligibility criteria for voluntary participation in the test and the basis for selecting participants; and,

(2) Post publication requirement. Within a reasonable time period following the completion of the test, a complete description of the results will be published in both the Federal Register and the Customs Bulletin.

[T.D. 95-21, 60 FR 14214, Mar. 16, 1995, as amended by CBP Dec. 12-21, 77 FR 73309, Dec. 10, 2012]



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