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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of July 25, 2014

Title 12: Banks and Banking


PART 4—ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS, AVAILABILITY AND RELEASE OF INFORMATION, CONTRACTING OUTREACH PROGRAM, POST-EMPLOYMENT RESTRICTIONS FOR SENIOR EXAMINERS


Contents

Subpart A—Organization and Functions

§4.1   Purpose.
§4.2   Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.
§4.3   Comptroller of the Currency.
§4.4   Washington office and web site.
§4.5   District and field offices.
§4.6   Frequency of examination of national banks and Federal savings associations.
§4.7   Frequency of examination of Federal agencies and branches.

Subpart B—Availability of Information Under the Freedom of Information Act

§4.11   Purpose and scope.
§4.12   Information available under the FOIA.
§4.13   Publication in the Federal Register.
§4.14   Public inspection and copying.
§4.15   How to request records.
§4.16   Predisclosure notice for confidential commercial information.
§4.17   FOIA request fees.
§4.18   How to track a FOIA request.

Subpart C—Release of Non-Public OCC Information

§4.31   Purpose and scope.
§4.32   Definitions.
§4.33   Requirements for a request of records or testimony.
§4.34   Where to submit a request.
§4.35   Consideration of requests.
§4.36   Disclosure of non-public OCC information.
§4.37   Persons and entities with access to OCC information; prohibition on dissemination.
§4.38   Restrictions on dissemination of released information.
§4.39   Notification of parties and procedures for sharing and using OCC records in litigation.
§4.40   Fees for services.
Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 4—Model Stipulation for Protective Order and Model Protective Order

Subpart D—Minority- , Women- , and Individuals With Disabilities-Owned Business Contracting Outreach Program; Contracting for Goods and Services

§4.61   Purpose.
§4.62   Definitions.
§4.63   Policy.
§4.64   Promotion.
§4.65   Certification.
§4.66   Oversight and monitoring.

Subpart E—One-Year Restrictions on Post-Employment Activities of Senior Examiners

§4.72   Scope and purpose.
§4.73   Definitions.
§4.74   One-year post-employment restrictions.
§4.75   Waivers.
§4.76   Penalties.

Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1, 12 U.S.C. 93a, 12 U.S.C. 5321, 12 U.S.C. 5412, and 12 U.S.C. 5414. Subpart A also issued under 5 U.S.C. 552. Subpart B also issued under 5 U.S.C. 552; E.O. 12600 (3 CFR 1987 Comp., p. 235). Subpart C also issued under 5 U.S.C. 301, 552; 12 U.S.C. 161, 481, 482, 484(a), 1442, 1462a, 1463, 1464, 1817(a)(2) and (3), 1818(u) and (v), 1820(d)(6), 1820(k), 1821(c), 1821(o), 1821(t), 1831m, 1831p-1, 1831o, 1867, 1951 et seq., 2601 et seq., 2801 et seq., 2901 et seq., 3101 et seq., 3401 et seq.; 15 U.S.C. 77uu(b), 78q(c)(3); 18 U.S.C. 641, 1905, 1906; 29 U.S.C. 1204; 31 U.S.C. 5318(g)(2), 9701; 42 U.S.C. 3601; 44 U.S.C. 3506, 3510. Subpart D also issued under 12 U.S.C. 1833e. Subpart E is also issued under 12 U.S.C. 1820(k).

Source: 60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—Organization and Functions

§4.1   Purpose.

This subpart describes the organization and functions of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), and provides the OCC's principal addresses.

§4.2   Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

The OCC is charged with assuring the safety and soundness of, and compliance with laws and regulations, fair access to financial services, and fair treatment of customers by, the institutions and other persons subject to its jurisdiction. The OCC examines, supervises, and regulates national banks, Federal branches and agencies of foreign banks, and Federal savings associations to carry out this mission. The OCC also issues rules and regulations applicable to state savings associations.

[76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011]

§4.3   Comptroller of the Currency.

The Comptroller of the Currency (Comptroller), as head of the OCC, is responsible for all OCC programs and functions. The Comptroller is appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for a term of five years. The Comptroller serves as a member of the board of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, a member of the Financial Stability Oversight Council, a member of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, and a member of the board of the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation. The Comptroller is advised and assisted by OCC staff, who perform the duties and functions that the Comptroller directs.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011]

§4.4   Washington office and web site.

The Washington office of the OCC is the main office and headquarters of the OCC. The Washington office directs OCC policy, oversees OCC operations, and is responsible for the direct supervision of certain national banks and Federal savings associations, including the largest national banks and the largest Federal savings associations (through the Large Bank Supervision Department); other national banks and Federal savings associations requiring special supervision; and Federal branches and agencies of foreign banks (through the Large Bank Supervision Department). The Washington office is located at 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219. The OCC's Web site is at http://www.occ.gov.

[76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011, as amended at 79 FR 15641, Mar. 21, 2014]

§4.5   District and field offices.

(a) District offices. Each district office of the OCC is responsible for the direct supervision of the national banks and Federal savings associations in its district, with the exception of the national banks and Federal savings associations supervised by the Washington office. The four district offices cover the United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands. The office address and the geographical composition of each district follows:

DistrictOffice addressGeographical composition
Northeastern DistrictOffice of the Comptroller of the Currency, 340 Madison Avenue, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10173-0002Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, northeast Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, the Virgin Islands, Virginia, and West Virginia.
Central DistrictOffice of the Comptroller of the Currency, One Financial Place, Suite 2700, 440 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, IL 60605Illinois, Indiana, central and southern Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, eastern Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.
Southern DistrictOffice of the Comptroller of the Currency, 500 North Akard Street, Suite 1600, Dallas, TX 75201Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.
Western DistrictOffice of the Comptroller of the Currency, 1225 17th Street, Suite 300, Denver, CO 80202Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, western Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Northern Mariana Islands, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and Guam.

(b) Field offices and duty stations. Field offices and duty stations support the bank and savings association supervisory responsibilities of the district offices.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 73 FR 22236, Apr. 24, 2008; 76 FR 43561, >July 21, 2011]

§4.6   Frequency of examination of national banks and Federal savings associations.

(a) General. The OCC examines national banks and Federal savings associations pursuant to authority conferred by 12 U.S.C. 481 (with respect to national banks) and 1463(a)(1) and 1464 (with respect to Federal savings associations) and the requirements of 12 U.S.C. 1820(d) (with respect to national banks and Federal savings associations). The OCC is required to conduct a full-scope, on-site examination of every national bank and Federal savings association at least once during each 12-month period.

(b) 18-month rule for certain small institutions. The OCC may conduct a full-scope, on-site examination of a national bank or a Federal savings association at least once during each 18-month period, rather than each 12-month period as provided in paragraph (a) of this section, if the following conditions are satisfied:

(1) The bank or Federal savings association has total assets of less than $500 million;

(2) The bank or Federal savings association is well capitalized as defined in part 6 of this chapter;

(3) At the most recent examination,:

(i) The bank or Federal savings association was assigned a rating of 1 or 2 for management as part of the bank's or association's rating under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System; and

(ii) The bank or Federal savings association was assigned a composite rating of 1 or 2 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System.

(4) The bank or Federal savings association currently is not subject to a formal enforcement proceeding or order by the FDIC, OCC, OTS or the Federal Reserve System; and

(5) No person acquired control of the bank or Federal savings association during the preceding 12-month period in which a full-scope, on-site examination would have been required but for this section.

(c) Authority to conduct more frequent examinations. This section does not limit the authority of the OCC to examine any national bank or Federal savings association as frequently as the agency deems necessary.

[63 FR 16380, Apr. 2, 1998, as amended at 72 FR 17802, Apr. 10, 2007; 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011]

§4.7   Frequency of examination of Federal agencies and branches.

(a) General. The OCC examines Federal agencies and Federal branches (as these entities are defined in §28.11 (g) and (h), respectively, of this chapter) pursuant to the authority conferred by 12 U.S.C. 3105(c)(1)(C). Except as noted in paragraph (b) of this section, the OCC will conduct a full-scope, on-site examination of every Federal branch and agency at least once during each 12-month period.

(b) 18-month rule for certain small institutions—(1) Mandatory standards. The OCC may conduct a full-scope, on-site examination at least once during each 18-month period, rather than each 12-month period as provided in paragraph (a) of this section, if the Federal branch or agency:

(i) Has total assets of less than $500 million;

(ii) Has received a composite ROCA supervisory rating (which rates risk management, operational controls, compliance, and asset quality) of 1 or 2 at its most recent examination;

(iii) Satisfies the requirements of either the following paragraph (b)(1)(iii) (A) or (B):

(A) The foreign bank's most recently reported capital adequacy position consists of, or is equivalent to, common equity tier 1, tier 1 and total risk-based capital ratios that satisfy the definition of “well capitalized” set forth at 12 CFR 6.4, respectively, on a consolidated basis; or

(B) The branch or agency has maintained on a daily basis, over the past three quarters, eligible assets in an amount not less than 108 percent of the preceding quarter's average third party liabilities (determined consistent with applicable federal and state law), and sufficient liquidity is currently available to meet its obligations to third parties;

(iv) Is not subject to a formal enforcement action or order by the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or the OCC; and

(v) Has not experienced a change in control during the preceding 12-month period in which a full-scope, on-site examination would have been required but for this section.

(2) Discretionary standards. In determining whether a Federal branch or agency that meets the standards of paragraph (b)(1) of this section should not be eligible for an 18-month examination cycle pursuant to this paragraph (b), the OCC may consider additional factors, including whether:

(i) Any of the individual components of the ROCA rating of the Federal branch or agency is rated “3” or worse;

(ii) The results of any off-site supervision indicate a deterioration in the condition of the Federal branch or agency;

(iii) The size, relative importance, and role of a particular office when reviewed in the context of the foreign bank's entire U.S. operations otherwise necessitate an annual examination; and

(iv) The condition of the foreign bank gives rise to such a need.

(c) Authority to conduct more frequent examinations. Nothing in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section limits the authority of the OCC to examine any Federal branch or agency as frequently as the OCC deems necessary.

[63 FR 46120, Aug. 28, 1998, as amended at 64 FR 56952, Oct. 22, 1999; 72 FR 17802, Apr. 10, 2007; 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011; 79 FR 11309, Feb. 28, 2014]

Subpart B—Availability of Information Under the Freedom of Information Act

§4.11   Purpose and scope.

(a) Purpose. This subpart sets forth the standards, policies, and procedures that the OCC applies in administering the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552) to facilitate the OCC's interaction with the banking and savings association industries and the public.

(b) Scope. (1) This subpart describes the information that the FOIA requires the OCC to disclose to the public (§4.12), and the three methods by which the OCC discloses that information under the FOIA (§§4.13, 4.14, and 4.15).

(2) This subpart also sets forth predisclosure notice procedures that the OCC follows, in accordance with Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1987 Comp., p. 235), when the OCC receives a request under §4.15 for disclosure of records that arguably are exempt from disclosure as confidential commercial information (§4.16). Finally, this subpart describes the fees that the OCC assesses for the services it renders in providing information under the FOIA (§4.17).

(3) This subpart does not apply to a request for records pursuant to the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a). A person requesting records from the OCC pursuant to the Privacy Act should refer to 31 CFR part 1, subpart C, and appendix J of subpart C.

(4) This subpart does not apply to FOIA requests filed with the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) before July 21, 2011. These requests are subject to the rules of the OTS in effect on July 20, 2011.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011]

§4.12   Information available under the FOIA.

(a) General. In accordance with the FOIA, OCC records are available to the public, except the exempt records described in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) Exemptions from availability. The following records, or portions thereof, are exempt from disclosure under the FOIA:

(1) A record that is specifically authorized, under criteria established by an Executive order, to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy, and that is properly classified pursuant to that Executive order;

(2) A record relating solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency;

(3) A record specifically exempted from disclosure by statute (other than 5 U.S.C. 552b), provided that the statute requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue, establishes particular criteria for withholding, or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld;

(4) A record that is privileged or contains trade secrets, or commercial or financial information, furnished in confidence, that relates to the business, personal, or financial affairs of any person (see §4.16 for notice requirements regarding disclosure of confidential commercial information);

(5) An intra-agency or interagency memorandum or letter not routinely available by law to a private party in litigation, including memoranda, reports, and other documents prepared by OCC employees, and records of deliberations and discussions at meetings of OCC employees;

(6) A personnel, medical, or similar record, including a financial record, or any portion thereof, where disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;

(7) A record or information compiled for law enforcement purposes, but only to the extent that the OCC reasonably believes that producing the record or information may:

(i) Interfere with enforcement proceedings;

(ii) Deprive a person of the right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication;

(iii) Constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;

(iv) Disclose the identity of a confidential source, including a State, local, or foreign agency or authority, or any private institution that furnished information on a confidential basis;

(v) Disclose information furnished by a confidential source, in the case of a record or information compiled by a criminal law enforcement authority in the course of a criminal investigation, or by an agency conducting a lawful national security intelligence investigation;

(vi) Disclose techniques and procedures for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions, or disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions if such disclosure reasonably could be expected to risk circumvention of the law; or

(vii) Endanger the life or physical safety of any individual;

(8) A record contained in or related to an examination, operating, or condition report prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of the OCC or any other agency responsible for regulating or supervising financial institutions;

(9) A record containing or relating to geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells; and

(10) Any OTS information similar to that listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (9) of this section, to the extent this information is in the possession of the OCC.

(c) Discretionary disclosure of exempt records. Even if a record is exempt under paragraph (b) of this section, the OCC may elect, on a case-by-case basis, not to apply the exemption to the requested record. The OCC's election not to apply an exemption to a requested record has no precedential significance as to the application or nonapplication of the exemption to any other requested record, regardless of who requests the record or when the OCC receives the request. The OCC will provide predisclosure notice to submitters of confidential commercial information in accordance with §4.16.

(d) Segregability. The OCC provides copies of reasonably segregable portions of a record to any person properly requesting the record pursuant to §4.15, after redacting any portion that is exempt under paragraph (b) of this section. The OCC will note the location and extent of any deletion, and identify the FOIA exemption under which material has been deleted, on the released portion of the material, unless doing so would harm an interest protected by the exemption under paragraph (b) of this section pursuant to which the deletion was made. Where technically feasible, the amount of information redacted and the exemption pursuant to which the redaction was made will be indicated at the site(s) of the deletion.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 75 FR 17850, Apr. 8, 2010; 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011]

§4.13   Publication in the Federal Register.

The OCC publishes certain documents in the Federal Register for the guidance of the public, including the following:

(a) Proposed and final rules; and

(b) Certain notices and policy statements of concern to the general public.

§4.14   Public inspection and copying.

(a) Available information. Subject to the exemptions listed in §4.12(b), the OCC makes the following information readily available for public inspection and copying:

(1) Any final order, agreement, or other enforceable document issued in the adjudication of an OCC enforcement case, including a final order published pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1818(u);

(2) Any final opinion issued in the adjudication of an OCC enforcement case;

(3) Any statement of general policy or interpretation of general applicability not published in the Federal Register;

(4) Any administrative staff manual or instruction to staff that may affect a member of the public as such;

(5) A current index identifying the information referred to in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section issued, adopted, or promulgated after July 4, 1967;

(6) A list of available OCC publications;

(7) A list of forms available from the OCC, and specific forms and instructions;1

1Some forms and instructions that national banks and Federal savings associations use, are not available from the OCC. The OCC will provide information on where persons may obtain these forms and instructions upon request.

(8) Any public Community Reinvestment Act performance evaluation;

(9) Any public securities-related filing required under parts 11, 16, 194 or 197 of this chapter;

(10) Any public comment letter regarding a proposed rule;

(11) The public file (as defined in 12 CFR 5.9) with respect to a pending application described in part 5 of this chapter; and

(12) Any OTS information similar to that listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(12) of this section, to the extent this information is in the possession of the OCC.

(b) Redaction of identifying details. To the extent necessary to prevent an invasion of personal privacy, the OCC may redact identifying details from any information described in paragraph (a) of this section before making the information available for public inspection and copying.

(c) Addresses. The information described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (10) and (a)(11) of this section is available from the Disclosure Officer, Communications Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219. The information described in paragraph (a)(11) of this section in the case of both banks and Federal savings associations is available from the Licensing Manager at the appropriate district office at the address listed in §4.5(a), or in the case of banks and savings associations supervised by Large Bank Supervision, from the Large Bank Licensing Expert, Licensing Department, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011; 78 FR 15461, Mar. 21, 2014]

§4.15   How to request records.

(a) Available information. Subject to the exemptions described in §4.12(b), any OCC record is available to any person upon specific request in accordance with this section.

(b) Where to submit request or appeal—(1) General. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, a person requesting a record or filing an administrative appeal must submit the request or appeal through the OCC's FOIA Web portal at https://foia-pal.occ.gov/palMain.aspx or under this section to the Disclosure Officer, Communications Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20219.

(2) Exceptions—(i) Records at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. A person requesting any of the following records, other than blank forms (see §4.14(a)(7)), must submit the request to the Disclosure Group, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550-17th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20429, (800) 945-2186:

(A) Consolidated Report of Condition and Income (FFIEC 031, 032, 033, 034);

(B) Annual Report of Trust Assets (FFIEC 001);

(C) Uniform Bank Performance Report; and

(D) Special Report.

(ii) Records of another agency. When the OCC receives a request for records in its possession that another Federal agency either generated or provided to the OCC, the OCC promptly informs the requester and immediately forwards the request to that agency for processing in accordance with that agency's regulations.

(c) Request for records—(1) Contact information and what the request for records must include. A person requesting records under this section must state, in writing:

(i) The requester's full name, address, telephone number and, at the requester's option, electronic mail address.

(ii) A reasonable description of the records sought (including sufficient detail to enable OCC employees who are familiar with the subject matter of the request to locate the records with a reasonable amount of effort);

(iii) A statement agreeing to pay all fees that the OCC assesses under §4.17;

(iv) A description of how the requester intends to use the records, if a requester seeks placement in a lower fee category (i.e., a fee category other than “commercial use requester”) under §4.17; and

(v) Whether the requester prefers the OCC to deliver a copy of the records or to allow the requester to inspect the records at the appropriate OCC office.

(2) Initial determination. The Comptroller or the Comptroller's delegate initially determines whether to grant a request for OCC records.

(3) If request is granted. If the OCC grants a request for records, in whole or in part, the OCC promptly discloses the records in one of two ways, depending on the requester's stated preference:

(i) The OCC may deliver a copy of the records to the requester. If the OCC delivers a copy of the records to the requester, the OCC duplicates the records at reasonable and proper times that do not interfere with their use by the OCC or preclude other persons from making inspections; or

(ii) The OCC may allow the requester to inspect the records at reasonable and proper times that do not interfere with their use by the OCC or preclude other persons from making inspections. If the OCC allows the requester to inspect the records, the OCC may place a reasonable limit on the number of records that a person may inspect during a day.

(4) If request is denied. If the OCC denies a request for records, in whole or in part, the OCC notifies the requester by mail. The notification is dated and contains a brief statement of the reasons for the denial, sets forth the name and title or position of the official making the decision, and advises the requester of the right to an administrative appeal in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section.

(d) Administrative appeal of a denial—(1) Procedure. A requester must submit an administrative appeal of denial of a request for records in writing within 35 days of the date of the initial determination. The appeal must include the circumstances and arguments supporting disclosure of the requested records.

(2) Appellate determination. The Comptroller or the Comptroller's delegate determines whether to grant an appeal of a denial of a request for OCC records.

(3) If appeal is granted. If the OCC grants an appeal, in whole or in part, the OCC treats the request as if it were originally granted, in whole or in part, by the OCC in accordance with paragraph (c)(3) of this section.

(4) If appeal is denied. If the OCC denies an appeal, in whole or in part, the OCC notifies the requester by mail. The notification contains a brief statement of the reasons for the denial, sets forth the name and title or position of the official making the decision, and advises the requester of the right to judicial review of the denial under 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(4)(B).

(e) Judicial review—(1) General. If the OCC denies an appeal pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section, or if the OCC fails to make a determination within the time limits specified in paragraph (f) of this section, the requester may commence an action to compel disclosure of records, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(4)(B), in the United States district court in:

(i) The district where the requester resides;

(ii) The district where the requester's principal place of business is located;

(iii) The district where the records are located; or

(iv) The District of Columbia.

(2) Service of process. In commencing an action described in paragraph (e)(1) of this section, the requester, in addition to complying with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (28 U.S.C. appendix) for service upon the United States or agencies thereof, must serve process on the Chief Counsel or the Chief Counsel's delegate at the following location: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20219.

(f) Time limits for responding to FOIA requests. (1) The OCC makes an initial determination to grant or deny a request for records within 20 days (excluding Saturday, Sundays, and holidays) after the date of receipt of the request, as described in paragraph (g) of this section, except as stated in paragraph (f)(3) of this section.

(2) Appeal. The OCC makes a determination to grant or deny an administrative appeal within 20 business days after the date of receipt of the appeal, as described in paragraph (g) of this section, except as stated in paragraph (f)(3) of this section.

(3) Extension of time. The time limits set forth in paragraphs (f)(1) and (2) of this section may be extended as follows:

(i) In unusual circumstances. The OCC may extend the time limits in unusual circumstances for a maximum of 10 business days. If the OCC extends the time limits, the OCC provides written notice to the person making the request or appeal, containing the reason for the extension and the date on which the OCC expects to make a determination. Unusual circumstances exist when the OCC requires additional time to:

(A) Search for and collect the requested records from field facilities or other buildings that are separate from the office processing the request or appeal;

(B) Search for, collect, and appropriately examine a voluminous amount of requested records;

(C) Consult with another agency that has a substantial interest in the determination of the request; or

(D) Allow two or more components of the OCC that have substantial interest in the determination of the request to consult with each other;

(ii) By agreement. A requester may agree to extend the time limits for any amount of time;

(iii) By judicial action. If a requester commences an action pursuant to paragraph (e) of this section for failure to comply with the time limits set forth in this paragraph (f), a court with jurisdiction may, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(6)(C), allow the OCC additional time to complete the review of the records requested, or

(iv) Tolling of time limits. (A) The OCC may toll the 20-day time period to:

(1) Make one request for additional information from the requester; or

(2) Clarify the applicability or amount of any fees, if necessary, with the requester.

(B) The tolling period ends upon the OCC's receipt of requested information from the requester or resolution of the fee issue.

(g) Date of receipt of request or appeal. The date of receipt of a request for records or an appeal is the date that Disclosure Services, Communications Division receives a request that satisfies the requirements of paragraph (c)(1) or (d)(1) of this section, except as provided in §4.17(d).

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 75 FR 17850, Apr. 8, 2010; 76 FR 43562, July 21, 2011; 79 FR 15641, Mar. 21, 2014]

§4.16   Predisclosure notice for confidential commercial information.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:

(1) Confidential commercial information means records that arguably contain material exempt from release under Exemption 4 of the FOIA (5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4); §4.12(b)(4)), because disclosure reasonably could cause substantial competitive harm to the submitter.

(2) Submitter means any person or entity that provides confidential commercial information to the OCC. This term includes corporations, State governments, foreign governments, and banks and their employees, officers, directors, and principal shareholders.

(b) Notice to submitter—(1) When provided. In accordance with Executive Order 12600 (3 CFR, 1987 Comp., p. 235), when the OCC receives a request under §4.15(c) or, where appropriate, an appeal under §4.15(d) for disclosure of confidential commercial information, the OCC provides a submitter with prompt written notice of the receipt of that request (except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section) in the following circumstances:

(i) With respect to confidential commercial information submitted to the OCC or to the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, the predecessor of the OTS, prior to January 1, 1988, if:

(A) The records are less than 10 years old and the submitter designated the information as confidential commercial information;

(B) The OCC reasonably believes that disclosure of the information may cause substantial competitive harm to the submitter; or

(C) The information is subject to a prior express commitment of confidentiality from the OCC or the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, the predecessor of the OTS; and

(ii) With respect to confidential commercial information submitted to the OCC or to the OTS (or the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, its predecessor agency) on or after January 1, 1988, if:

(A) The submitter in good faith designated the information as confidential commercial information;

(B) The OCC or the OTS (or the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, its predecessor agency) designated the class of information to which the requested information belongs as confidential commercial information; or

(C) The OCC reasonably believes that disclosure of the information may cause substantial competitive harm to the submitter.

(2) Exceptions. The OCC generally does not provide notice under paragraph (b)(1) of this section if the OCC determines that:

(i) It will not disclose the information;

(ii) The information already has been disclosed officially to the public;

(iii) The OCC is required by law (other than 5 U.S.C. 552) to disclose the information;

(iv) The OCC or the OTS (or the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, its predecessor agency) acquired the information in the course of a lawful investigation of a possible violation of criminal law;

(v) The submitter had an opportunity to designate the requested information as confidential commercial information at the time of submission of the information or a reasonable time thereafter and did not do so, unless the OCC has substantial reason to believe that disclosure of the information would result in competitive harm; or

(vi) The OCC determines that the submitter's designation under paragraph (b)(1)(ii)(A) of this section is frivolous; in such case, however, the OCC will provide the submitter with written notice of any final administrative determination to disclose the information at least 10 business days prior to the date that the OCC intends to disclose the information.

(3) Content of notice. The OCC either describes in the notice the exact nature of the confidential commercial information requested or includes with the notice copies of the records or portions of records containing that information.

(4) Expiration of notice period. The OCC provides notice under this paragraph (b) with respect to information that the submitter designated under paragraph (b)(1)(ii)(A) of this section only for a period of 10 years after the date of the submitter's designation, unless the submitter requests and justifies to the OCC's satisfaction a specific notice period of greater duration.

(5) Certification of confidentiality. If possible, the submitter should support the claim of confidentiality with a statement or certification that the requested information is confidential commercial information that the submitter has not disclosed to the public. This statement should be prepared by an officer or authorized representative if the submitter is a corporation or other entity.

(c) Notice to requester. If the OCC provides notice to a submitter under paragraph (b) of this section, the OCC notifies the person requesting confidential commercial information (requester) that it has provided notice to the submitter. The OCC also advises the requester that if there is a delay in its decision whether to grant or deny access to the information sought, the delay may be considered a denial of access to the information, and that the requester may proceed with an administrative appeal or seek judicial review. However, the requester may agree to a voluntary extension of time to allow the OCC to review the submitter's objection to disclosure (see §4.15(f)(3)(ii)).

(d) Opportunity to object to disclosure. Within 10 days after receiving notice under paragraph (b) of this section, the submitter may provide the OCC with a detailed statement of objection to disclosure of the information. That statement must specify the grounds for withholding any of the information under any exemption of the FOIA. Any statement that the submitter provides under this paragraph (d) may be subject to disclosure under the FOIA.

(e) Notice of intent to disclose. The OCC considers carefully a submitter's objection and specific grounds for nondisclosure prior to determining whether to disclose the requested information. If the OCC decides to disclose information over the objection of the submitter, the OCC provides to the submitter, with a copy to the requester, a written notice that includes:

(1) A statement of the OCC's reasons for not sustaining the submitter's objections to disclosure;

(2) A description of the information to be disclosed;

(3) The anticipated disclosure date, which is not less than 10 business days after the OCC mails the written notice required under this paragraph (e); and

(4) A statement that the submitter must notify the OCC immediately if the submitter intends to seek injunctive relief.

(f) Notice of requester's lawsuit. Whenever the OCC receives service of process indicating that a requester has brought suit seeking to compel the OCC to disclose information covered by paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the OCC promptly notifies the submitter.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 76 FR 43561, July 21, 2011]

§4.17   FOIA request fees.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:

(1) Actual costs means those expenditures that the OCC incurs in providing services (including searching for, reviewing, and duplicating records) in response to a request for records under §4.15.

(2) Search means the process of locating a record in response to a request, including page-by-page or line-by-line identification of material within a record. The OCC may perform a search manually or by electronic means.

(3) Review means the process of examining a record located in response to a request to determine which portions of that record should be released. It also includes processing a record for disclosure.

(4) Duplication means the process of copying a record in response to a request. A copy may take the form of a paper copy, microform, audiovisual materials, or machine readable material (e.g., magnetic tape or disk), among others.

(5) Commercial use requester means a person who seeks records for a use or purpose that furthers the commercial, trade, or profit interests of the requester or the person on whose behalf the request is made.

(6) Educational institution requester means a person who seeks records on behalf of a public or private educational institution, including a preschool, an elementary or secondary school, an institution of undergraduate or graduate higher education, an institution of professional education, or an institution of vocational education that operates a program of scholarly research.

(7) Noncommercial scientific institution requester means a person who is not a “commercial use requester,” as that term is defined in paragraph (a)(5) of this section, and who seeks records on behalf of an institution operated solely for the purpose of conducting scientific research, the results of which are not intended to promote any particular product or industry.

(8) Requester who is a representative of the news media means any person who, or entity that, gathers information of potential interest to a segment of the public, uses editorial skills to turn the raw materials into a distinct work, and distributes that work to an audience. A freelance journalist shall be regarded as working for a news media entity if the person can demonstrate a solid basis for expecting publication through that entity, whether or not the journalist is actually employed by that entity. A publication contract is one example of a basis for expecting publication that ordinarily would satisfy this standard. The OCC also may consider the past publication record of the requester in determining whether she or he qualifies as a “representative of the news media.”

(b) Fees—(1) General. The hourly and per page rate that the OCC generally charges requesters is set forth in the “Notice of Comptroller of the Currency Fees” (Notice) described in 12 CFR 8.8. Any interested person may request a copy of the Notice from the OCC by mail or may obtain a copy at the location described in §4.14(c). The OCC may contract with a commercial service to search for, duplicate, or disseminate records, provided that the OCC determines that the fee assessed upon a requester is no greater than if the OCC performed the tasks itself. The OCC does not contract out responsibilities that the FOIA provides that the OCC alone may discharge, such as determining the applicability of an exemption or whether to waive or reduce a fee.

(2) Fee categories. The OCC assesses a fee based on the fee category in which the OCC places the requester. If the request states how the requester intends to use the requested records (see §4.15(c)(1)(iv)), the OCC may place the requester in a lower fee category; otherwise, the OCC categorizes the requester as a “commercial use requester.” If the OCC reasonably doubts the requester's stated intended use, or if that use is not clear from the request, the OCC may place the requester in the “commercial use” category or may seek additional clarification. The fee categories are as follows:

(i) Commercial use requesters. The OCC assesses a fee for a requester in this category for the actual cost of search, review, and duplication. A requester in this category does not receive any free search, review, or duplication services.

(ii) Educational institution requesters, noncommercial scientific institution requesters, and requesters who are representatives of the news media. The OCC assesses a fee for a requester in this category for the actual cost of duplication. A requester in this category receives 100 free pages.

(iii) All other requesters. The OCC assesses a fee for a requester who does not fit into either of the above categories for the actual cost of search and duplication. A requester in this category receives 100 free pages and two hours of free search time.

(3) Special services. The OCC may, in its discretion, accommodate a request for special services. The OCC may recover the actual cost of providing any special services.

(4) Waiving or reducing a fee. The OCC may waive or reduce a fee under this section whenever, in its opinion, disclosure of records is in the public interest because the disclosure:

(i) Is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government; and

(ii) Is not primarily in the commercial interest of the requester.

(5) Fee for unsuccessful search. The OCC may assess a fee for time spent searching for records, even if the OCC does not locate the records requested.

(6) No fee if the time limit passes and the OCC has not responded to the request. The OCC will not assess search or duplication fees, as applicable, if it fails to respond to a requester's FOIA request within the time limits specified under 12 CFR 4.15, and no “unusual” circumstances (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(6)(B) and §4.15(f)(3)(i)) or “exceptional” circumstances (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(6)(C)) apply to the processing of the request.

(c) Payment of fees—(1) General. The OCC generally assesses a fee when it delivers the records in response to the request, if any. A requester must send payment within 30 calendar days of the billing date to the Communications Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20219.

(2) Fee likely to exceed $25. If the OCC estimates that a fee is likely to exceed $25, the OCC notifies the requester of the estimated fee, unless the requester has indicated in advance a willingness to pay a fee as high as the estimated fee. If so notified by the OCC, the requester may confer with OCC employees to revise the request to reflect a lower fee.

(3) Fee likely to exceed $250. If the OCC estimates that a fee is likely to exceed $250, the OCC notifies the requester of the estimated fee. In this circumstance, the OCC may require, as a condition to processing the request, that the requester:

(i) Provide satisfactory assurance of full payment, if the requester has a history of prompt payment; or

(ii) Pay the estimated fee in full, if the requester does not have a history of prompt payment.

(4) Failure to pay a fee. If the requester fails to pay a fee within 30 days of the date of the billing, the OCC may require, as a condition to processing any further request, that the requester pay any unpaid fee, plus interest (as provided in paragraph (c)(5) of this section), and any estimated fee in full for that further request.

(5) Interest on unpaid fee. The OCC may assess interest charges on an unpaid fee beginning on the 31st day following the billing date. The OCC charges interest at the rate prescribed in 31 U.S.C. 3717.

(d) Tolling of time limits. Under the circumstances described in paragraphs (c) (2), (3), and (4) of this section, the time limits set forth in §4.15(f) (i.e., 20 business days from the receipt of a request for records and 20 business days from the receipt of an administrative appeal, plus any permissible extension) begin only after the OCC receives a revised request under paragraph (c)(2) of this section, an assurance of payment under paragraph (c)(3)(i) of this section, or the required payments under paragraph (c)(3)(i) or (c)(4) of this section.

(e) Aggregating requests. When the OCC reasonably believes that a requester or group of requesters is attempting to break a request into a series of requests for the purpose of evading the assessment of a fee, the OCC may aggregate the requests and assess a fee accordingly.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 75 FR 17850, Apr. 8, 2010]

§4.18   How to track a FOIA request.

(a) Tracking number. (1) Internet requests. The OCC will issue a tracking number to all FOIA requesters automatically upon receipt of the request (as described in §4.15(g)) by the OCC's Communications Department via the OCC's Freedom of Information Request Portal, https://foia-pal.occ.gov/palMain.aspx. The tracking number will be sent via electronic mail to the requester.

(2) If a requester does not have Internet access. The OCC will issue a tracking number to FOIA requesters without Internet access within 5 days of the receipt of the request (as described in §4.15(g)) in the OCC's Communications Department. The OCC will mail the tracking number to the requester's physical address, as provided in the FOIA request.

(b) Status of request. FOIA requesters may track the progress of their requests via the OCC's Freedom of Information Request Portal, https://foia-pal.occ.gov/palMain.aspx. Requesters without Internet access may continue to contact the Disclosure Officer, Communications Division, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, at (202) 874-4700 to check the status of their FOIA request(s).

[76 FR 43562, July 21, 2011]

Subpart C—Release of Non-Public OCC Information

§4.31   Purpose and scope.

(a) Purpose. The purposes of this subpart are to:

(1) Afford an orderly mechanism for the OCC to process expeditiously requests for non-public OCC information; to address the release of non-public OCC information without a request; and, when appropriate, for the OCC to assert evidentiary privileges in litigation;

(2) Recognize the public's interest in obtaining access to relevant and necessary information and the countervailing public interest of maintaining the effectiveness of the OCC supervisory process and appropriate confidentiality of OCC supervisory information;

(3) Ensure that the OCC's information is used in a manner that supports the public interest and the interests of the OCC;

(4) Ensure that OCC resources are used in the most efficient manner consistent with the OCC's statutory mission;

(5) Minimize burden on national banks, Federal savings associations, the public, and the OCC;

(6) Limit the expenditure of government resources for private purposes; and

(7) Maintain the OCC's impartiality among private litigants.

(b) Scope. (1) This subpart applies to requests for, and dissemination of, non-public OCC information, including requests for records or testimony arising out of civil lawsuits and administrative proceedings to which the OCC is not a party and the release of non-public OCC information without a specific request. Lawsuits and administrative proceedings to which the OCC is not a party include proceedings in which a Federal agency is a party in opposition to the private requester.

(2) This subpart does not apply to:

(i) A request for a record or testimony in a proceeding in which the OCC is a party; or

(ii) A request for a record that is required to be disclosed under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), as described in §4.12.

(3) A request for a record or testimony made by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, a government agency of the United States or a foreign government, a state agency with authority to investigate violations of criminal law, or a state bank or state savings association regulatory agency is governed solely by §4.37(c).

(4) For purposes of §§4.35(a)(1), 4.36(a) and 4.37(c) of this part, the OCC's decision to disclose records or testimony involving a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) filed pursuant to the regulations implementing 12 U.S.C. 5318(g), or any information that would reveal the existence of a SAR, is governed by 12 CFR 21.11(k).

(5) This subpart does not apply to requests for non-public information filed with the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) before July 21, 2011. These requests are subject to the rules of the OTS in effect on July 20, 2011.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998; 64 FR 29216, June 1, 1999; 75 FR 75576, Dec. 3, 2010; 76 FR 43562, July 21, 2011]

§4.32   Definitions.

(a) Complete request means a request containing sufficient information to allow the OCC to make an informed decision.

(b) Non-public OCC information. Non-public OCC information:

(1) Means information that the OCC is not required to release under the FOIA (5 U.S.C. 552) or that the OCC has not yet published or made available pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1818(u) and includes:

(i) A record created or obtained:

(A) By the OCC in connection with the OCC's performance of its responsibilities, such as a record concerning supervision, licensing, regulation, and examination of a national bank, a Federal savings association, a bank holding company, a savings and loan holding company, or an affiliate; or

(B) By the OTS in connection with the OTS's performance of its responsibilities, such as a record concerning supervision, licensing, regulation, and examination of a Federal savings association, a savings and loan holding company, or an affiliate;

(ii) A record compiled by the OCC or the OTS in connection with either agency's enforcement responsibilities;

(iii) A report of examination, supervisory correspondence, an investigatory file compiled by the OCC or OTS in connection with an investigation, and any internal agency memorandum, whether the information is in the possession of the OCC or some other individual or entity;

(iv) Confidential OCC information obtained by a third party or otherwise incorporated in the records of a third party, including another government agency;

(v) Testimony from, or an interview with, a current or former OCC employee, officer, or agent or a former OTS employee, officer, or agent concerning information acquired by that person in the course of his or her performance of official duties with the OCC or OTS or due to that person's official status at the OCC or OTS; and

(vi) Confidential information relating to operating and no longer operating national banks, Federal savings associations, and savings and loan holding companies as well as their subsidiaries and their affiliates.

(2) Is the property of the Comptroller.

(c) Relevant means could contribute substantially to the resolution of one or more specifically identified issues in the case.

(d) Show a compelling need means, in support of a request for testimony, demonstrate with as much detail as is necessary under the circumstances, that the requested information is relevant and that the relevant material contained in the testimony is not available from any other source. Sources, without limitation, include the books and records of other persons or entities and non-public OCC records that have been, or might be, released.

(e) Supervised entity includes a national bank or Federal savings association, a subsidiary of a national bank or Federal savings association, or a Federal branch or agency of a foreign bank licensed by the OCC as defined under 12 CFR 28.11(g) and (h), or any other entity supervised by the OCC.

(f) Testimony means an interview or sworn testimony on the record.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998; 64 FR 29216, June 1, 1999; 75 FR 75576, Dec. 3, 2010; 76 FR 43562, July 21, 2011]

§4.33   Requirements for a request of records or testimony.

(a) Generally—(1) Form of request. A person seeking non-public OCC information must submit a request in writing to the OCC. The requester must explain, in as detailed a description as is necessary under the circumstances, the bases for the request and how the requested non-public OCC information relates to the issues in the lawsuit or matter.

(2) Expedited request. A requester seeking a response in less than 60 days must explain why the request was not submitted earlier and why the OCC should expedite the request.

(3) Request arising from adversarial matters. Where the requested information is to be used in connection with an adversarial matter:

(i) The OCC generally will require that the lawsuit or administrative action has been filed before it will consider the request;

(ii) The request must include:

(A) A copy of the complaint or other pleading setting forth the assertions in the case;

(B) The caption and docket number of the case;

(C) The name, address, and phone number of counsel to each party in the case; and

(D) A description of any prior judicial decisions or pending motions in the case that may bear on the asserted relevance of the requested information;

(iii) The request must also:

(A) Show that the information is relevant to the purpose for which it is sought;

(B) Show that other evidence reasonably suited to the requester's needs is not available from any other source;

(C) Show that the need for the information outweighs the public interest considerations in maintaining the confidentiality of the OCC information and outweighs the burden on the OCC to produce the information;

(D) Explain how the issues in the case and the status of the case warrant that the OCC allow disclosure; and

(E) Identify any other issue that may bear on the question of waiver of privilege by the OCC.

(b) Request for records. If the request is for a record, the requester must adequately describe the record or records sought by type and date.

(c) Request for testimony—(1) Generally. A requester seeking testimony:

(i) Must show a compelling need for the requested information; and

(ii) Should request OCC testimony with sufficient time to obtain the testimony in deposition form.

(2) Trial or hearing testimony. A requester seeking testimony at a trial or hearing must show that a deposition would not suffice.

§4.34   Where to submit a request.

(a) A request for non-public OCC information. A person requesting information under this subpart, requesting authentication of a record under §4.39(d), or submitting a notification of the issuance of a subpoena or compulsory process under §4.37, shall send the request or notification to: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, 400 7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20219, Attention: Director, Litigation Division.

(b) Combined requests for non-public and other OCC information. A person requesting public OCC information and non-public OCC information under this subpart may submit a combined request for both to the address in paragraph (a) of this section. If a requester decides to submit a combined request under this section, the OCC will process the combined request under this subpart and not under subpart B of this part (FOIA).

(c) Request by government agencies. A request made pursuant to §4.37(c) must be submitted:

(1) In a civil action, to the Director of the OCC's Litigation Division at the Washington office; or

(2) In a criminal action, to the appropriate district counsel or the Director of the OCC's Enforcement and Compliance Division at the Washington office.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 64 FR 29216, June 1, 1999; 79 FR 15641, Mar. 21, 2014]

§4.35   Consideration of requests.

(a) In general—(1) OCC discretion. The OCC decides whether to release non-public OCC information based on its weighing of all appropriate factors including the requestor's fulfilling of the requirements enumerated in §4.33. Each decision is at the sole discretion of the Comptroller or the Comptroller's delegate and is a final agency decision. OCC action on a request for non-public OCC information exhausts administrative remedies for discovery of the information.

(2) Bases for denial. The OCC may deny a request for non-public OCC information for reasons that include the following:

(i) The requester was unsuccessful in showing that the information is relevant to the pending matter;

(ii) The requester seeks testimony and the requestor did not show a compelling need for the information;

(iii) The request arises from an adversarial matter and other evidence reasonably suited to the requester's need is available from another source;

(iv) A lawsuit or administrative action has not yet been filed and the request was made in connection with potential litigation;

(v) The production of the information would be contrary to the public interest or unduly burdensome to the OCC; or

(vi) When prohibited by law.

(3) Additional information. A requester must submit a complete request. The OCC may require the requester to provide additional information to complete a request. Consistent with the purposes stated in §4.31, the OCC may inquire into the circumstances of any case underlying the request and rely on sources of information other than the requester, including other parties.

(4) Time required by the OCC to respond. The OCC generally will process requests in the order in which they are received. The OCC will notify the requester in writing of the final decision. Absent exigent or unusual circumstances, the OCC will respond to a request within 60 days from the date that the OCC receives a request that it deems a complete request. Consistent with §4.33(a)(2), the OCC weighs a request to respond to provide information in less than 60 days against the unfairness to other requesters whose pending requests may be delayed and the burden imposed on the OCC by the expedited processing.

(5) Notice to subject national banks and Federal savings associations. Following receipt of a request for non-public OCC information, the OCC generally notifies the national bank or Federal savings association that is the subject of the requested information, unless the OCC, in its discretion, determines that to do so would advantage or prejudice any of the parties in the matter at issue.

(b) Testimony. (1) The OCC generally will not authorize a current OCC employee to provide expert or opinion evidence for a private party.

(2) The OCC may restrict the scope of any authorized testimony and may act to ensure that the scope of testimony given by the OCC employee adheres to the scope authorized by the OCC.

(3) Once a request for testimony has been submitted, and before the requested testimony occurs, a party to the relevant case, who did not join in the request and who wishes to question the witness beyond the scope of testimony sought by the request, shall timely submit the party's own request for OCC information pursuant to this subpart.

(4) The OCC may offer the requester the employee's written declaration in lieu of testimony.

(c) Release of non-public OCC information by others. In appropriate cases, the OCC may respond to a request for information by authorizing a party to the case who is in possession of non-public OCC information to release the information to the requester. An OCC authorization to release records does not preclude the party in possession from asserting its own privilege, arguing that the records are not relevant, or asserting any other argument for which it has standing to protect the records from release.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, 75 FR 75576, Dec. 3, 2010; 76 FR 43563, July 21, 2011]

§4.36   Disclosure of non-public OCC information.

(a) Discretionary disclosure of non-public OCC information. The OCC may make non-public OCC information available to a supervised entity and to other persons, that in the sole discretion of the Comptroller may be necessary or appropriate, without a request for records or testimony.

(b) OCC policy. It is the OCC's policy regarding non-public OCC information that such information is confidential and privileged. Accordingly, the OCC will not normally disclose this information to third parties.

(c) Conditions and limitations. The OCC may impose any conditions or limitations on disclosures under this section, including the restrictions on dissemination contained in §4.38, that it determines are necessary to effect the purposes of this section.

(d) Unauthorized disclosures prohibited. All non-public OCC information remains the property of the OCC. No supervised entity, government agency, person, or other party to whom the information is made available, or any officer, director, employee, or agent thereof, may disclose non-public OCC information without the prior written permission of the OCC, except in published statistical material that does not disclose, either directly or when used in conjunction with other publicly available information, the affairs of any individual, corporation, or other entity. Except as authorized by the OCC, no person obtaining access to non-public OCC information under this section may make a copy of the information and no person may remove non-public OCC information from the premises of the institution, agency, or other party in authorized possession of the information.

[63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998, as amended at 64 FR 29216, June 1, 1999]

§4.37   Persons and entities with access to OCC information; prohibition on dissemination.

(a) Current and former OCC employees or agents; former OTS employees or agents—(1) Generally. Except as authorized by this subpart or otherwise by the OCC, no current or former OCC employee or agent or former OTS employee or agent, may, in any manner, disclose or permit the disclosure of any non-public OCC information to anyone other than an employee or agent of the Comptroller for use in the performance of OCC duties.

(2) Duty of person served. Any current or former OCC employee or agent or former OTS employee or agent, subpoenaed or otherwise requested to provide information covered by this subpart must immediately notify the OCC as provided in this paragraph. The OCC may intervene, attempt to have the compulsory process withdrawn, and register appropriate objections when a current or former OCC employee or agent or former OTS employee or agent, receives a subpoena and the subpoena requires the current or former employee or agent to appear or produce OCC information. If necessary, the current or former employee or agent must appear as required and respectfully decline to produce the information sought, citing this subpart as authority and United States ex rel. Touhy v. Ragen, 340 U.S. 462 (1951). The current or former OCC employee or agent or former OTS employee or agent, must immediately notify the OCC if subpoenaed or otherwise asked for non-public OCC information:

(i) In a civil action, by notifying the Director of the OCC's Litigation Division at the Washington office; or

(ii) In a criminal action, by notifying the appropriate district counsel for current and former district employees or agents; or the Director of the OCC's Enforcement and Compliance Division at the Washington office, for current and former Washington employees or agents and former OTS employees or agents.

(b) Non-OCC employees or entities—(1) Generally. (i) Without OCC approval, no person, national bank, Federal savings association, or other entity, including one in lawful possession of non-public OCC information under paragraph (b)(2) of this section, may disclose information covered by this subpart in any manner, except:

(A) After the requester has sought the information from the OCC pursuant to the procedures set forth in this subpart; and

(B) As ordered by a Federal court in a judicial proceeding in which the OCC has had the opportunity to appear and oppose discovery.

(ii) Any person who discloses or uses non-public OCC information except as expressly permitted by the Comptroller of the Currency or as ordered by a Federal court, under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, may be subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 641.

(2) Exception for national banks and Federal savings associations. When necessary or appropriate for business purposes, a national bank, Federal savings association, or holding company, or any director, officer, or employee thereof, may disclose non-public OCC information, including information contained in, or related to, OCC reports of examination, to a person or organization officially connected with the bank or Federal savings association as officer, director, employee, attorney, auditor, or independent auditor. A national bank, Federal savings association, or holding company or a director, officer, or employee thereof, may also release non-public OCC information to a consultant under this paragraph if the consultant is under a written contract to provide services to the bank or Federal savings association and the consultant has a written agreement with the bank or Federal savings association in which the consultant:

(i) States its awareness of, and agreement to abide by, the prohibition on the dissemination of non-public OCC information contained in paragraph (b)(1) of this section; and

(ii) Agrees not to use the non-public OCC information for any purpose other than as provided under its contract to provide services to the bank or Federal savings association.

(3) Duty of person or entity served. Any person, national bank, Federal savings association, or other entity served with a request, subpoena, order, motion to compel, or other judicial or administrative process to provide non-public OCC information shall:

(i) Immediately notify the Director of the OCC's Litigation Division at the Washington, DC office and inform the Director of all relevant facts, including the documents and information requested, so that the OCC may intervene in the judicial or administrative action if appropriate;

(ii) Inform the requester of the substance of these rules and, in particular, of the obligation to follow the request procedures in §§4.33 and 4.34; and

(iii) At the appropriate time, inform the court or tribunal that issued the process of the substance of these rules.

(4) Actions of the OCC following notice of service. Following receipt of notice pursuant to paragraph (b)(3) of this section, the OCC may direct the requester to comply with §§4.33 and 4.34, intervene in the judicial or administrative action, attempt to have the compulsory process withdrawn, or register other appropriate objections.

(5) Return of records. The OCC may require any person in possession of OCC records to return the records to the OCC.

(c) Disclosure to government agencies. When not prohibited by law, the Comptroller may make available to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and, in the Comptroller's sole discretion, to certain other government agencies of the United States and foreign governments, state agencies with authority to investigate violations of criminal law, and state bank and state savings association regulatory agencies, a copy of a report of examination, testimony, or other non-public OCC information for their use, when necessary, in the performance of their official duties. All non-public OCC information made available pursuant to this paragraph is OCC property, and the OCC may condition its use on appropriate confidentiality protections, including the mechanisms identified in §4.38.

(d) Intention of OCC not to waive rights. The possession by any of the entities or individuals described in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section of non-public OCC information does not constitute a waiver by the OCC of its right to control, or impose limitations on, the subsequent use and dissemination of the information.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998; 64 FR 29217, June 1, 1999; 75 FR 75576, Dec. 3, 2010; 76 FR 43563, July 21, 2011]

§4.38   Restrictions on dissemination of released information.

(a) Records. The OCC may condition a decision to release non-public OCC information on entry of a protective order by the court or administrative tribunal presiding in the particular case or, in non-adversarial matters, on a written agreement of confidentiality. In a case in which a protective order has already been entered, the OCC may condition approval for release of non-public OCC information upon the inclusion of additional or amended provisions in the protective order. The OCC may authorize a party who obtained records for use in one case to provide them to another party in another case.

(b) Testimony. The OCC may condition its authorization of deposition testimony on an agreement of the parties to appropriate limitations, such as an agreement to keep the transcript of the testimony under seal or to make the transcript available only to the parties, the court, and the jury. Upon request or on its own initiative, the OCC may allow use of a transcript in other litigation. The OCC may require the requester, at the requester's expense, to furnish the OCC with a copy of the transcript. The OCC employee whose deposition was transcribed does not waive his or her right to review the transcript and to note errors.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995. Redesignated at 63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998]

§4.39   Notification of parties and procedures for sharing and using OCC records in litigation.

(a) Responsibility of litigants to notify parties of a request for testimony. Upon submitting a request to the OCC for the testimony of an OCC employee or former OCC or OTS employee, the requester shall notify all other parties to the case that a request has been submitted.

(b) Responsibility of litigants to share released records. The requester shall promptly notify other parties to a case of the release of non-public OCC information obtained pursuant to this subpart, and, upon entry of a protective order, shall provide copies of OCC information, including OCC information obtained pursuant to §4.15, to the other parties.

(c) Retrieval and destruction of released records. At the conclusion of an action:

(1) The requester shall retrieve any non-public OCC information from the court's file as soon as the court no longer requires the information;

(2) Each party shall destroy the non-public OCC information covered by the protective order; and

(3) Each party shall certify to the OCC that the non-public OCC information covered by the protective order has been destroyed.

(d) Authentication for use as evidence. Upon request, the OCC authenticates released records to facilitate their use as evidence. Requesters who require authenticated records or certificates of nonexistence of records should, as early as possible, request certificates from the OCC's Litigation Division pursuant to §4.34(a).

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995. Redesignated at 63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998; 76 FR 43563, July 21, 2011]

§4.40   Fees for services.

(a) Fees for records search, copying, and certification. The requester shall pay a fee to the OCC, or to a commercial copier under contract to the OCC, for any records search, copying, or certification in accordance with the standards specified in §4.17. The OCC may require a requester to remit payment prior to providing the requested information.

(b) Witness fees and mileage. A person whose request for testimony of a current OCC employee is approved shall, upon completion of the testimonial appearance, tender promptly to the OCC payment for the witness fees and mileage. The litigant shall compute these amounts in accordance with 28 U.S.C. 1821. A litigant whose request for testimony of a former OCC employee is approved shall tender promptly to the witness any witness fees or mileage due in accordance with 28 U.S.C. 1821.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995. Redesignated at 63 FR 62929, Nov. 10, 1998]

Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 4—Model Stipulation for Protective Order and Model Protective Order

I. Model Stipulation

CASE CAPTION

Model Stipulation for Protective Order

Whereas, counsel for ______ have applied to the Comptroller of the Currency (hereinafter “Comptroller”) pursuant to 12 CFR part 4, Subpart C, for permission to have made available, in connection with the captioned action, certain records; and

Whereas, such records are deemed by the Comptroller to be confidential and privileged, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 481, 1463(a)(1), 1464(a)(1) and 1464(d)(1)(B)(i); 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(8); 18 U.S.C. 641, 1906; and 12 CFR 4.12, and part 4, Subpart C; and

Whereas, following consideration by the Comptroller of the application of the above described party, the Comptroller has determined that the particular circumstances of the captioned action warrant making certain possibly relevant records as denoted in appendix “A” to this Stipulation [records to be specified by type and date] available to the parties in this action, provided that appropriate protection of their confidentiality can be secured;

Therefore, it is hereby stipulated by and between the parties hereto, through their respective attorneys that they will be bound by the following protective order which may be entered by the Court without further notice.

Dated this ______ day of _______, 19__.

 

Attorney for Plaintiff

 

Attorney for Defendant

II. Model Protective Order

CASE CAPTION

Model Protective Order

Whereas, counsel for ______ have applied to the Comptroller of the Currency (hereinafter Comptroller”) pursuant to 12 CFR part 4, Subpart C, for permission to have made available, in connection with the captioned action, certain records; and

Whereas, such records are deemed by the Comptroller to be confidential and privileged, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 481, 1463(a)(1), 1464(a)(1) and 1464(d)(1)(B)(i); 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(8); 18 U.S.C. 641, 1906; and 12 CFR 4.12, and part 4, Subpart C;

Whereas, following consideration by the Comptroller of the application of the above described party, the Comptroller has determined that the particular circumstances of the captioned action warrant making certain possibly relevant records available to the parties in this action, provided that appropriate protection of their confidentiality can be secured;

Now, Therefore, it is Ordered That:

1. The records, as denoted in appendix “A” to the Stipulation for this Protective Order, upon being furnished [or released for use] by the Comptroller, shall be disclosed only to the parties to this action, their counsel, and the court [and the jury].

2. The parties to this action and their counsel shall keep such records and any information contained in such records confidential and shall in no way divulge the same to any person or entity, except to such experts, consultants and non-party witnesses to whom the records and their contents shall be disclosed, solely for the purpose of properly preparing for and trying the action.

3. No person to whom information and records covered by this Order are disclosed shall make any copies or otherwise use such information or records or their contents for any purpose whatsoever, except in connection with this action.

4. Any party or other person who wishes to use the information or records or their contents in any other action shall make a separate application to the Comptroller pursuant to 12 CFR part 4, Subpart C.

5. Should any records covered by this Order be filed with the Court or utilized as exhibits at depositions in the captioned action, or should information or records or their contents covered by this Order be disclosed in the transcripts of depositions or the trial in the captioned action, such records, exhibits and transcripts shall be filed in sealed envelopes or other sealed containers marked with the title of this action, identifying each document and article therein and bearing a statement substantially in the following form:

CONFIDENTIAL

Pursuant to the Order of the Court dated ______ this envelope containing the above-identified papers filed by (the name of the party) is not to be opened nor the contents thereof displayed or revealed except to the parties to this action or their counsel or by further Order of the Court.

6. FOR JURY TRIAL: Any party offering any of the records into evidence shall offer only those pages, or portions thereof, that are relevant and material to the issues to be decided in the action and shall block out any portion of any page that contains information not relevant or material. Furthermore, the name of any person or entity contained on any page of the records who is not a party to this action, or whose name is not otherwise relevant or material to the action, shall be blocked out prior to the admission of such page into evidence. Any disagreement regarding what portion of any page that should be blocked out in this manner shall be resolved by the Court in camera, and the Court shall decide its admissibility into evidence.

7. At the conclusion of this action, all parties shall certify to the Comptroller that the records covered by this Order have been destroyed. Furthermore, counsel for ______, pursuant to 12 CFR 4.39(c), shall retrieve any records covered by this Order that may have been filed with the Court.

So Ordered:

 

Judge

Date

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 64 FR 29217, June 1, 1999]

Subpart D—Minority- , Women- , and Individuals With Disabilities-Owned Business Contracting Outreach Program; Contracting for Goods and Services

§4.61   Purpose.

Pursuant to the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989, Sec. 1216(c), Pub. L. 101-73, 103 Stat. 183, 529 (12 U.S.C. 1833e(c)) and consistent with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 701 et seq.), this subpart establishes the OCC Minority- , Women- , and Individuals with Disabilities-Owned Business Contracting Outreach Program (Outreach Program). The Outreach Program is intended to ensure that firms owned and operated by minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities have the opportunity to participate, to the maximum extent possible, in all contracting activities of the OCC.

§4.62   Definitions.

(a) Minority- and/or women-owned (small and large) businesses and entities owned by minorities and women (MWOB) means firms at least 51 percent unconditionally-owned by one or more members of a minority group or by one or more women who are citizens of the United States. In the case of publicly-owned companies, at least 51 percent of each class of voting stock must be unconditionally-owned by one or more members of a minority group or by one or more women who are citizens of the United States. In the case of a partnership, at least 51 percent of the partnership interest must be unconditionally-owned by one or more members of a minority group or by one or more women who are citizens of the United States. Additionally, for the foregoing cases, the management and daily business operations must be controlled by one or more such individuals.

(b) Minority means any African American, Native American (i.e., American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut and Native Hawaiian), Hispanic American, Asian-Pacific American, or Subcontinent-Asian American.

(c) Individual with disabilities-owned (small and large) businesses and entities owned by individuals with disabilities (IDOB) means firms at least 51 percent unconditionally-owned by one or more members who are individuals with disabilities and citizens of the United States. In the case of publicly-owned companies, at least 51 percent of each class of voting stock must be unconditionally-owned by one or more members who are individuals with disabilities and who are citizens of the United States. In the case of a partnership, at least 51 percent of the partnership interest must be unconditionally-owned by one or more members who are individuals with disabilities and citizens of the United States. Additionally, for the foregoing cases, the management and daily business operations must be controlled by one or more such individuals.

(d) Individual with disabilities means any person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of such person's major life activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment. For purposes of this part, it does not include an individual who is currently engaging in the illegal use of drugs nor an individual who has a currently contagious disease or infection and who, by reason of such disease or infection, would constitute a direct threat to the health or safety of other individuals or who, by reason of the currently contagious disease or infection, is unable to perform the duties of the job as defined by the IDOB.

(e) Unconditional ownership means ownership that is not subject to conditions or similar arrangements which cause the benefits of the Outreach Program to accrue to persons other than the participating MWOB or IDOB.

§4.63   Policy.

The OCC's policy is to ensure that MWOBs and IDOBs have the opportunity to participate, to the maximum extent possible, in contracts awarded by the OCC. The OCC awards contracts consistent with the principles of full and open competition and best value acquisition, and with the concept of contracting for agency needs at the lowest practicable cost. The OCC ensures that MWOBs and IDOBs have the opportunity to participate fully in all contracting activities that the OCC enters into for goods and services, whether generated by the headquarters office in Washington, DC, or any other office of the OCC. Contracting opportunities may include small purchase awards, contracts above the small purchase threshold, and delivery orders issued against other governmental agency contracts.

§4.64   Promotion.

(a) Scope. The OCC, under the direction of the Deputy Comptroller for Resource Management, engages in promotion and outreach activities designed to identify MWOBs and IDOBs capable of providing goods and services needed by the OCC, to facilitate interaction between the OCC and the MWOBs and IDOBs community, and to indicate the OCC's commitment to doing business with that community. The Outreach Program is designed to facilitate OCC's participation in business promotion events sponsored by other government agencies and attended by minorities, women and individuals with disabilities. Once the OCC has identified a prospective participant, it will assist the minority- or women-owned business or individual with disabilities-owned business in understanding the OCC's needs and contracting process.

(b) Outreach activities. OCC's Outreach Program includes the following:

(1) Obtaining various lists and directories of MWOBs and IDOBs maintained by government agencies;

(2) Contacting appropriate firms for participation in the OCC's Outreach Program;

(3) Participating in business promotion events comprised of or attended by MWOBs and IDOBs to explain OCC contracting opportunities and to obtain names of potential MWOBs and IDOBs;

(4) Ensuring that the OCC contracting staff understands and actively promotes this Outreach Program; and

(5) Registering MWOBs and IDOBs in the Department of the Treasury's database to facilitate their participation in the competitive procurement process for OCC contracts. This database is used by OCC procurement staff to identify firms to be solicited for OCC procurements.

§4.65   Certification.

(a) Objective. To preserve the integrity and foster the Outreach Program's objectives, each prospective MWOB or IDOB must demonstrate that it meets the ownership and control requirements for participation in the Outreach Program.

(b) MWOB. A prospective MWOB may demonstrate its eligibility for participation in the Outreach Program by:

(1) Submitting a valid MWOB certification received from another government agency whose definition of MWOB is substantially similar to that specified in §4.62(a);

(2) Self-certifying MWOB ownership status by filing with the OCC a completed and signed certification form as prescribed by the Federal Acquisition Regulation, 48 CFR 53.301-129; or

(3) Submitting a valid MWOB certification received from the Small Business Administration.

(c) IDOB. A prospective IDOB may demonstrate its eligibility for participation in the Outreach Program by:

(1) Submitting a valid IDOB certification received from another government agency whose definition of IDOB is substantially similar to that specified in §4.62(c); or

(2) Self-certifying IDOB ownership status by filing with the OCC a completed and signed certification as prescribed in the Federal Acquisition Regulation, 48 CFR 53.301-129, and adding an additional certifying statement to read as follows:

I certify that I am an individual with disabilities as defined in 12 CFR 4.62(d), and that my firm, (Name of Firm) qualifies as an individual with disabilities-owned business as defined in 12 CFR 4.62(c).

§4.66   Oversight and monitoring.

The Deputy Comptroller for Resource Management shall appoint an Outreach Program Manager, who shall appoint an Outreach Program Specialist. The Outreach Program Manager is primarily responsible for program advocacy, oversight and monitoring.

Subpart E—One-Year Restrictions on Post-Employment Activities of Senior Examiners

Source: 70 FR 69637, Nov. 17, 2005, unless otherwise noted.

§4.72   Scope and purpose.

This subpart describes those OCC examiners who are subject to the post-employment restrictions set forth in section 10(k) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act) (12 U.S.C. 1820(k)) and implements those restrictions for officers and employees of the OCC.

§4.73   Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart:

Bank holding company means any company that controls a bank (as provided in section 2 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841 et seq.)).

Consultant. For purposes of this subpart, a consultant for a national bank, savings association, bank holding company, savings and loan holding company, or other company shall include only an individual who works directly on matters for, or on behalf of, such bank, savings association, bank holding company, savings and loan holding company, or other company.

Control has the meaning given in section 2 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1841(a)) or in section 10 of the Home Owners' Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a), as applicable under the circumstances. For purposes of this subpart, a foreign bank shall be deemed to control any branch or agency of the foreign bank.

Depository institution has the meaning given in section 3 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)). For purposes of this subpart, a depository institution includes an uninsured branch or agency of a foreign bank, if such branch or agency is located in any State.

Federal Reserve means the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Reserve Banks.

Foreign bank means any foreign bank or company described in section 8(a) of the International Banking Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3106(a)).

Insured depository institution has the meaning given in section 3 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(c)(2)).

National bank means a national banking association or a Federal branch or agency of a foreign bank.

Savings association has the meaning given in section 3 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(b)(1)).

Savings and loan holding company means any company that controls a savings association or any other company that is a savings and loan holding company (as provided in section 10 of the Home Owners' Loan Act (12 U.S.C. 1467a)).

Senior examiner. For purposes of this subpart, an officer or employee of the OCC is considered to be the “senior examiner” for a particular national bank or savings association if—

(1) The officer or employee has been authorized by the OCC to conduct examinations on behalf of the OCC;

(2) The officer or employee has been assigned continuing, broad, and lead responsibility for examining the national bank or savings association; and

(3) The officer's or employee's responsibilities for examining the national bank or savings association—

(i) Represent a substantial portion of the officer's or employee's assigned responsibilities; and

(ii) Require the officer or employee to interact routinely with officers or employees of the national bank or savings association, or its affiliates.”

[70 FR 69637, Nov. 17, 2005, as amended at 76 FR 43563, July 21, 2011]

§4.74   One-year post-employment restrictions.

An officer or employee of the OCC who serves as the senior examiner of a national bank or savings association for two or more months during the last twelve months of such individual's employment with the OCC may not, within one year after leaving the employment of the OCC, knowingly accept compensation as an employee, officer, director or consultant from the national bank, savings association, or any company (including a bank holding company or savings and loan holding company) that controls the national bank or savings association.

[76 FR 43564, July 21, 2011]

§4.75   Waivers.

The post-employment restrictions set forth in section 10(k) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1820(k)) and §4.74 do not apply to any officer or employee of the OCC, or any former officer or employee of the OCC, if the Comptroller of the Currency certifies, in writing and on a case-by-case basis, that granting the individual a waiver of the restrictions would not affect the integrity of the OCC's supervisory program.

[76 FR 43564, July 21, 2011]

§4.76   Penalties.

(a) Penalties under section 10(k) of FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1820(k)). If a senior examiner of a national bank or savings association, after leaving the employment of the OCC, accepts compensation as an employee, officer, director, or consultant from that bank, savings association, or any company (including a bank holding company or savings and loan holding company) that controls that bank or savings association in violation of §4.74, then the examiner shall, in accordance with section 10(k)(6) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1820(k)(6)), be subject to one of the following penalties—

(1) An order—

(i) Removing the individual from office or prohibiting the individual from further participation in the affairs of the relevant national bank, savings association, bank holding company, savings and loan holding company, or other company that controls such institution for a period of up to five years; and

(ii) Prohibiting the individual from participating in the affairs of any insured depository institution for a period of up to five years; or

(2) A civil monetary penalty of not more than $250,000.

(b) Enforcement by appropriate Federal banking agency. Violations of §4.74 shall be administered or enforced by the appropriate Federal banking agency for the depository institution or depository institution holding company that provided compensation to the former senior examiner. For purposes of this paragraph, the appropriate Federal banking agency for a company that is not a depository institution or depository institution holding company shall be the Federal banking agency that formerly employed the senior examiner.

(c) Scope of prohibition orders. Any senior examiner who is subject to an order issued under paragraph (a) of this section shall, as required by 12 U.S.C. 1820(k)(6)(B), be subject to paragraphs (6) and (7) of section 8(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1818(e)(6)-(7)) in the same manner and to the same extent as a person subject to an order issued under section 8(e).

(d) Procedures. The procedures applicable to actions under paragraph (a) of this section are provided in section 10(k)(6) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1820(k)(6)) and in 12 CFR part 19.

(e) Remedies not exclusive. The OCC may seek both of the penalties described in paragraph (a) of this section. In addition, a senior examiner who accepts compensation as described in §4.74 may be subject to other administrative, civil or criminal remedies or penalties as provided in law.

[60 FR 57322, Nov. 15, 1995, as amended at 76 FR 43564, July 21, 2011]



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