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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of December 19, 2014

Title 16Chapter IISubchapter B → Part 1199


Title 16: Commercial Practices


PART 1199— CHILDREN'S TOYS AND CHILD CARE ARTICLES CONTAINING PHTHALATES: GUIDANCE ON INACCESSIBLE COMPONENT PARTS


Contents
§1199.1   Children's toys and child care articles: Phthalate-containing inaccessible component parts.

Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1251-1289, 86 Stat. 1207, 125 Stat. 273.

Source: 78 FR 10506, Feb. 14, 2013, unless otherwise noted.

§1199.1   Children's toys and child care articles: Phthalate-containing inaccessible component parts.

(a) Section 108 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) permanently prohibits the sale of any “children's toy or child care article” containing more than 0.1 percent of three specified phthalates (di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP)). Section 108 of the CPSIA also prohibits, on an interim basis, “toys that can be placed in a child's mouth” or “child care article” containing more than 0.1 percent of three additional phthalates (diisononyl phthalate (DINP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), and di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP)). A “children's toy” is defined as a consumer product designed or intended by the manufacturer for a child 12 years of age or younger for use by the child when the child plays. A toy can be placed in a child's mouth if any part of the toy can actually be brought to the mouth and kept in the mouth by a child so that it can be sucked and chewed. If the children's product can only be licked, it is not regarded as able to be placed in the mouth. If a toy or part of a toy in one dimension is smaller than 5 centimeters, it can be placed in the mouth. The term “child care article” means a consumer product designed or intended by the manufacturer to facilitate sleep or the feeding of children age 3 years and younger, or to help such children with sucking or teething.

(b) Section 108(d) of the CPSIA provides that the prohibitions in paragraph (a) of this section do not apply to component parts of a children's toy or child care article that are not accessible to children through normal and reasonably foreseeable use and abuse of such product, as determined by the Commission. A component part is not accessible if it is not physically exposed, by reason of a sealed covering or casing, and does not become physically exposed through reasonably foreseeable use and abuse of the product, including swallowing, mouthing, breaking, or other children's activities, and the aging of the product.

(c) Section 108(d)(3) of the CPSIA directs the Commission to promulgate a rule to provide guidance with respect to what product components or classes of components will be considered to be inaccessible for a children's toy or child care article that contains phthalates or adopt the same guidance with respect to inaccessibility that was adopted by the Commission with regard to accessibility of lead under section 101(b)(2)(B) (15 U.S.C. 1278a(b)(2)(B)), with additional consideration, as appropriate, of whether such component can be placed in a child's mouth. 15 U.S.C. 2057c(d)(3). The Commission adopts the same guidance with respect to inaccessibility for the phthalates that was adopted by the Commission with regard to accessibility of lead, however, vinyl (or other plasticized material) covered mattresses/sleep surfaces, that contain phthalates that are designed or intended by the manufacturer to facilitate sleep of children age 3 and younger, are considered accessible and would not be considered inaccessible through the use of fabric coverings, including sheets and mattress pads.

(d) The accessibility probes specified for sharp points or edges under the Commission's regulations at 16 CFR 1500.48-1500.49 should be used to assess the accessibility of phthalate-containing component parts of a children's toy or child care article. A phthalate-containing component part would be considered accessible if it can be contacted by any portion of the specified segment of the accessibility probe. A phthalate-containing component part would be considered inaccessible if it cannot be contacted by any portion of the specified segment of the accessibility probe.

(e) For children's toys or child care articles intended for children that are 18 months of age or younger, the use and abuse tests set forth under the Commission's regulations at 16 CFR 1500.50 and 16 CFR 1500.51 (excluding the bite test of §1500.51(c)), should be used to evaluate accessibility of phthalate-containing component parts of a children's toy or child care article as a result of normal and reasonably foreseeable use and abuse of the product.

(f) For children's toys or child care articles intended for children that are over 18 months, but not over 36 months of age, the use and abuse tests set forth under the Commission's regulations at 16 CFR 1500.50 and 16 CFR 1500.52 (excluding the bite test of §1500.52(c)), should be used to evaluate accessibility of phthalate-containing component parts of a children's toy or child care article as a result of normal and reasonably foreseeable use and abuse of the product.

(g) For children's toys intended for children that are over 36 months, but not over 96 months of age, the use and abuse tests set forth under the Commission's regulations at 16 CFR 1500.50 and 16 CFR 1500.53 (excluding the bite test of §1500.53(c)), should be used to evaluate accessibility of phthalate-containing component parts of a children's toy as a result of normal and reasonably foreseeable use and abuse of the product.

(h) For children's toys intended for children over 96 months through 12 years of age, the use and abuse tests set forth under the Commission's regulations at 16 CFR 1500.50 and 16 CFR 1500.53 (excluding the bite test of §1500.53(c)) intended for children ages 37-96 months should be used to evaluate accessibility of phthalate-containing component parts of a children's toy as a result of normal and reasonably foreseeable use and abuse of the product.

(i) Because the Commission adopts the same guidance with respect to inaccessibility for phthalates that was adopted by the Commission with regard to inaccessibility of lead, paint, coatings, and electroplating may not be considered a barrier that would render phthalate-containing component parts of toys and child care articles inaccessible. A children's toy or child care article that is or contains a phthalate-containing part that is enclosed, encased, or covered by fabric and passes the appropriate use and abuse tests on such covers, is considered inaccessible to a child, unless the product or part of the product, in one dimension, is smaller than 5 centimeters. However, vinyl (or other plasticized material) covered mattresses/sleep surfaces that contain phthalates that are designed or intended by the manufacturer to facilitate sleep of children age 3 and younger, are considered accessible and would not be considered inaccessible through the use of fabric coverings, including sheets and mattress pads.

(j) The intentional disassembly or destruction of products by children older than age 8 years, by means or knowledge not generally available to younger children, including use of tools, will not be considered in evaluating products for accessibility of phthalate-containing components.



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