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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of October 16, 2014

Title 40Chapter ISubchapter CPart 60 → Subpart EEEE


Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 60—STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES


Subpart EEEE—Standards of Performance for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units for Which Construction is Commenced After December 9, 2004, or for Which Modification or Reconstruction is Commenced on or After June 16, 2006


Contents

Introduction

§60.2880   What does this subpart do?
§60.2881   When does this subpart become effective?

Applicability

§60.2885   Does this subpart apply to my incineration unit?
§60.2886   What is a new incineration unit?
§60.2887   What combustion units are excluded from this subpart?
§60.2888   Are air curtain incinerators regulated under this subpart?
§60.2889   Who implements and enforces this subpart?
§60.2890   How are these new source performance standards structured?
§60.2891   Do all components of these new source performance standards apply at the same time?

Preconstruction Siting Analysis

§60.2894   Who must prepare a siting analysis?
§60.2895   What is a siting analysis?

Waste Management Plan

§60.2899   What is a waste management plan?
§60.2900   When must I submit my waste management plan?
§60.2901   What should I include in my waste management plan?

Operator Training and Qualification

§60.2905   What are the operator training and qualification requirements?
§60.2906   When must the operator training course be completed?
§60.2907   How do I obtain my operator qualification?
§60.2908   How do I maintain my operator qualification?
§60.2909   How do I renew my lapsed operator qualification?
§60.2910   What site-specific documentation is required?
§60.2911   What if all the qualified operators are temporarily not accessible?

Emission Limitations and Operating Limits

§60.2915   What emission limitations must I meet and by when?
§60.2916   What operating limits must I meet and by when?
§60.2917   What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?
§60.2918   What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

Performance Testing

§60.2922   How do I conduct the initial and annual performance test?
§60.2923   How are the performance test data used?

Initial Compliance Requirements

§60.2927   How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limitations and establish the operating limits?
§60.2928   By what date must I conduct the initial performance test?

Continuous Compliance Requirements

§60.2932   How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations and the operating limits?
§60.2933   By what date must I conduct the annual performance test?
§60.2934   May I conduct performance testing less often?
§60.2935   May I conduct a repeat performance test to establish new operating limits?

Monitoring

§60.2939   What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?
§60.2940   How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?
§60.2941   What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?
§60.2942   What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection requirement enforceable?
§60.2943   How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?
§60.2944   What operating parameter monitoring equipment must I install, and what operating parameters must I monitor?
§60.2945   Is there a minimum amount of operating parameter monitoring data I must obtain?

Recordkeeping and Reporting

§60.2949   What records must I keep?
§60.2950   Where and in what format must I keep my records?
§60.2951   What reports must I submit?
§60.2952   What must I submit prior to commencing construction?
§60.2953   What information must I submit prior to initial startup?
§60.2954   What information must I submit following my initial performance test?
§60.2955   When must I submit my annual report?
§60.2956   What information must I include in my annual report?
§60.2957   What else must I report if I have a deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations?
§60.2958   What must I include in the deviation report?
§60.2959   What else must I report if I have a deviation from the requirement to have a qualified operator accessible?
§60.2960   Are there any other notifications or reports that I must submit?
§60.2961   In what form can I submit my reports?
§60.2962   Can reporting dates be changed?

Title V Operating Permits

§60.2966   Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my unit?
§60.2967   When must I submit a title V permit application for my new unit?

Temporary-Use Incinerators and Air Curtain Incinerators Used in Disaster Recovery

§60.2969   What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in disaster recovery?

Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste

§60.2970   What is an air curtain incinerator?
§60.2971   What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?
§60.2972   How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?
§60.2973   What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?
§60.2974   Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?

Equations

§60.2975   What equations must I use?

Definitions

§60.2977   What definitions must I know?
Table 1 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Emission Limitations
Table 2 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers
Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)
Table 4 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Summary of Reporting Requirements

Source: 70 FR 74892, Dec. 16, 2005, unless otherwise noted.

Introduction

§60.2880   What does this subpart do?

This subpart establishes new source performance standards for other solid waste incineration (OSWI) units. Other solid waste incineration units are very small municipal waste combustion units and institutional waste incineration units.

§60.2881   When does this subpart become effective?

This subpart takes effect June 16, 2006. Some of the requirements in this subpart apply to planning the incineration unit and must be completed even before construction is initiated on the unit (i.e., the preconstruction requirements in §§60.2894 and 60.2895). Other requirements such as the emission limitations and operating limits apply when the unit begins operation.

Applicability

§60.2885   Does this subpart apply to my incineration unit?

Yes, if your incineration unit meets all the requirements specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section.

(a) Your incineration unit is a new incineration unit as defined in §60.2886.

(b) Your incineration unit is an OSWI unit as defined in §60.2977 or an air curtain incinerator subject to this subpart as described in §60.2888(b). Other solid waste incineration units are very small municipal waste combustion units and institutional waste incineration units as defined in §60.2977.

(c) Your incineration unit is not excluded under §60.2887.

§60.2886   What is a new incineration unit?

(a) A new incineration unit is an incineration unit subject to this subpart that meets either of the two criteria specified in paragraphs (a)(1) or (2) of this section.

(1) Commenced construction after December 9, 2004.

(2) Commenced reconstruction or modification on or after June 16, 2006.

(b) This subpart does not affect your incineration unit if you make physical or operational changes to your incineration unit primarily to comply with the emission guidelines in subpart FFFF of this part. Such changes do not qualify as reconstruction or modification under this subpart.

§60.2887   What combustion units are excluded from this subpart?

This subpart excludes the types of units described in paragraphs (a) through (q) of this section, as long as you meet the requirements of this section.

(a) Cement kilns. Your unit is excluded if it is regulated under subpart LLL of part 63 of this chapter (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry).

(b) Co-fired combustors. Your unit, that would otherwise be considered a very small municipal waste combustion unit, is excluded if it meets the five requirements specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (5) of this section.

(1) The unit has a Federally enforceable permit limiting the combustion of municipal solid waste to 30 percent of the total fuel input by weight.

(2) You notify the Administrator that the unit qualifies for the exclusion.

(3) You provide the Administrator with a copy of the Federally enforceable permit.

(4) You record the weights, each calendar quarter, of municipal solid waste and of all other fuels combusted.

(5) You keep each report for 5 years. These records must be kept on site for at least 2 years. You may keep the records off site for the remaining 3 years.

(c) Cogeneration facilities. Your unit is excluded if it meets the three requirements specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) The unit qualifies as a cogeneration facility under section 3(18)(B) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 796(18)(B)).

(2) The unit burns homogeneous waste (not including refuse-derived fuel) to produce electricity and steam or other forms of energy used for industrial, commercial, heating, or cooling purposes.

(3) You notify the Administrator that the unit meets all of these criteria.

(d) Commercial and industrial solid waste incineration units. Your unit is excluded if it is regulated under subparts CCCC or DDDD of this part and is required to meet the emission limitations established in those subparts.

(e) Hazardous waste combustion units. Your unit is excluded if it meets either of the two criteria specified in paragraph (e)(1) or (2) of this section.

(1) You are required to get a permit for your unit under section 3005 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

(2) Your unit is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEE (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Hazardous Waste Combustors).

(f) Hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators. Your unit is excluded if it is regulated under subparts Ce or Ec of this part (New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators).

(g) Incinerators and air curtain incinerators in isolated areas of Alaska. Your incineration unit is excluded if it is used at a solid waste disposal site in Alaska that is classified as a Class II or Class III municipal solid waste landfill, as defined in §60.2977.

(h) Rural institutional waste incinerators. Your incineration unit is excluded if it is an institutional waste incineration unit, as defined in §60.2977, and the application for exclusion described in paragraphs (h)(1) and (2) of this section has been approved by the Administrator.

(1) Prior to initial startup, an application and supporting documentation demonstrating that the institutional waste incineration unit meets the two requirements specified in paragraphs (h)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section must be submitted to and approved by the Administrator.

(i) The unit is located more than 50 miles from the boundary of the nearest Metropolitan Statistical Area,

(ii) Alternative disposal options are not available or are economically infeasible.

(2) The application described in paragraph (h)(1) of this section must be revised and resubmitted to the Administrator for approval every 5 years following the initial approval of the exclusion for your unit.

(3) If you re-applied for an exclusion pursuant to paragraph (h)(2) of this section and were denied exclusion by the Administrator, you have 3 years from the expiration date of the current exclusion to comply with the emission limits and all other applicable requirements of this subpart.

(i) Institutional boilers and process heaters. Your unit is excluded if it is regulated under 40 CFR part 63, subpart DDDDD (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters).

(j) Laboratory Analysis Units. Your unit is excluded if it burns samples of materials only for the purpose of chemical or physical analysis.

(k) Materials recovery units. Your unit is excluded if it combusts waste for the primary purpose of recovering metals. Examples include primary and secondary smelters.

(l) Pathological waste incineration units. Your institutional waste incineration unit or very small municipal waste combustion unit is excluded from this subpart if it burns 90 percent or more by weight (on a calendar quarter basis and excluding the weight of auxiliary fuel and combustion air) of pathological waste, low-level radioactive waste, and/or chemotherapeutic waste as defined in §60.2977 and you notify the Administrator that the unit meets these criteria.

(m) Small or large municipal waste combustion units. Your unit is excluded if it is regulated under subparts AAAA, BBBB, Ea, Eb, or Cb, of this part and is required to meet the emission limitations established in those subparts.

(n) Small power production facilities. Your unit is excluded if it meets the three requirements specified in paragraphs (n)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) The unit qualifies as a small power-production facility under section 3(17)(C) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 796(17)(C)).

(2) The unit burns homogeneous waste (not including refuse-derived fuel) to produce electricity.

(3) You notify the Administrator that the unit meets all of these criteria.

(o) Temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in disaster recovery. Your incineration unit is excluded if it is used on a temporary basis to combust debris from a disaster or emergency such as a tornado, hurricane, flood, ice storm, high winds, or act of bioterrorism and you comply with the requirements in §60.2969.

(p) Units that combust contraband or prohibited goods. Your incineration unit is excluded if the unit is owned or operated by a government agency such as police, customs, agricultural inspection, or a similar agency to destroy only illegal or prohibited goods such as illegal drugs, or agricultural food products that can not be transported into the country or across State lines to prevent biocontamination. The exclusion does not apply to items either confiscated or incinerated by private, industrial, or commercial entities.

(q) Incinerators used for national security. Your incineration unit is excluded if it meets the requirements specified in either (q)(1) or (2) of this section.

(1) The incineration unit is used solely during military training field exercises to destroy national security materials integral to the field exercises.

(2) The incineration unit is used solely to incinerate national security materials, its use is necessary to safeguard national security, you follow the exclusion request requirements in paragraphs (q)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section, and the Administrator has approved your request for exclusion.

(i) The request for exclusion and supporting documentation must demonstrate both that the incineration unit is used solely to destroy national security materials and that a reliable alternative to incineration that ensures acceptable destruction of national security materials is unavailable, on either a permanent or temporary basis.

(ii) The request for exclusion must be submitted to and approved by the Administrator prior to initial startup.

§60.2888   Are air curtain incinerators regulated under this subpart?

(a) Air curtain incinerators that burn less than 35 tons per day of municipal solid waste or air curtain incinerators located at institutional facilities burning any amount of institutional waste generated at that facility are subject to all requirements of this subpart, including the emission limitations specified in table 1 of this subpart.

(b) Air curtain incinerators that burn only less than 35 tons per day of the materials listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section collected from the general public and from residential, commercial, institutional, and industrial sources; or, air curtain incinerators located at institutional facilities that burn only the materials listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section generated at that facility, are required to meet only the requirements in §§60.2970 through 60.2974 and are exempt from all other requirements of this subpart.

(1) 100 percent wood waste.

(2) 100 percent clean lumber.

(3) 100 percent yard waste.

(4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste.

§60.2889   Who implements and enforces this subpart?

(a) This subpart can be implemented and enforced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or a delegated authority such as your State, local, or tribal agency. If EPA has delegated authority to your State, local, or tribal agency, then that agency (as well as EPA) has the authority to implement and enforce this subpart. You should contact your EPA Regional Office to find out if this subpart is delegated to your State, local, or tribal agency.

(b) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority of this subpart to a State, local, or tribal agency, the authorities contained in paragraphs (b)(1) through (6) of this section are retained by EPA and are not transferred to the State, local, or tribal agency.

(1) Approval of alternatives to the emission limitations in table 1 of this subpart and operating limits established under §60.2916 and table 2 of this subpart.

(2) Approval of petitions for specific operating limits in §60.2917.

(3) Approval of major alternatives to test methods.

(4) Approval of major alternatives to monitoring.

(5) Approval of major alternatives to recordkeeping and reporting.

(6) The status report requirements in §60.2911(c)(2).

§60.2890   How are these new source performance standards structured?

These new source performance standards contain nine major components, as follows:

(a) Preconstruction siting analysis.

(b) Waste management plan.

(c) Operator training and qualification.

(d) Emission limitations and operating limits.

(e) Performance testing.

(f) Initial compliance requirements.

(g) Continuous compliance requirements.

(h) Monitoring.

(i) Recordkeeping and reporting.

§60.2891   Do all components of these new source performance standards apply at the same time?

No, you must meet the preconstruction siting analysis and waste management plan requirements before you commence construction, reconstruction, or modification of the OSWI unit. The operator training and qualification, emission limitations, operating limits, performance testing and compliance, monitoring, and most recordkeeping and reporting requirements are met after the OSWI unit begins operation.

Preconstruction Siting Analysis

§60.2894   Who must prepare a siting analysis?

(a) You must prepare a siting analysis if you commence construction, reconstruction, or modification of an OSWI unit after June 16, 2006.

(b) If you commence construction, reconstruction, or modification of an OSWI unit after December 9, 2004, but before June 16, 2006, you are not required to prepare the siting analysis specified in this subpart.

§60.2895   What is a siting analysis?

(a) The siting analysis must consider air pollution control alternatives that minimize, on a site-specific basis, to the maximum extent practicable, potential risks to public health or the environment. In considering such alternatives, you may consider costs, energy impacts, nonair environmental impacts, or any other factors related to the practicability of the alternatives.

(b) Analyses of your OSWI unit's impacts that are prepared to comply with State, local, or other Federal regulatory requirements may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section, provided they include the consideration of air pollution control alternatives specified in paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) You must complete and submit the siting requirements of this section as required under §60.2952(c) prior to commencing construction, reconstruction, or modification.

Waste Management Plan

§60.2899   What is a waste management plan?

A waste management plan is a written plan that identifies both the feasibility and the methods used to reduce or separate certain components of solid waste from the waste stream in order to reduce or eliminate toxic emissions from incinerated waste.

§60.2900   When must I submit my waste management plan?

You must submit a waste management plan prior to commencing construction, reconstruction, or modification.

§60.2901   What should I include in my waste management plan?

A waste management plan must include consideration of the reduction or separation of waste-stream elements such as paper, cardboard, plastics, glass, batteries, or metals; or the use of recyclable materials. The plan must identify any additional waste management measures and implement those measures the source considers practical and feasible, considering the effectiveness of waste management measures already in place, the costs of additional measures, the emissions reductions expected to be achieved, and any other environmental or energy impacts they might have.

Operator Training and Qualification

§60.2905   What are the operator training and qualification requirements?

(a) No OSWI unit can be operated unless a fully trained and qualified OSWI unit operator is accessible, either at the facility or can be at the facility within 1 hour. The trained and qualified OSWI unit operator may operate the OSWI unit directly or be the direct supervisor of one or more other plant personnel who operate the unit. If all qualified OSWI unit operators are temporarily not accessible, you must follow the procedures in §60.2911.

(b) Operator training and qualification must be obtained through a State-approved program or by completing the requirements included in paragraph (c) of this section.

(c) Training must be obtained by completing an incinerator operator training course that includes, at a minimum, the three elements described in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Training on the thirteen subjects listed in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (xiii) of this section.

(i) Environmental concerns, including types of emissions.

(ii) Basic combustion principles, including products of combustion.

(iii) Operation of the specific type of incinerator to be used by the operator, including proper startup, waste charging, and shutdown procedures.

(iv) Combustion controls and monitoring.

(v) Operation of air pollution control equipment and factors affecting performance (if applicable).

(vi) Inspection and maintenance of the incinerator and air pollution control devices.

(vii) Methods to monitor pollutants (including monitoring of incinerator and control device operating parameters) and monitoring equipment calibration procedures, where applicable.

(viii) Actions to correct malfunctions or conditions that may lead to malfunction.

(ix) Bottom and fly ash characteristics and handling procedures.

(x) Applicable Federal, State, and local regulations, including Occupational Safety and Health Administration workplace standards.

(xi) Pollution prevention.

(xii) Waste management practices.

(xiii) Recordkeeping requirements.

(2) An examination designed and administered by the instructor.

(3) Written material covering the training course topics that may serve as reference material following completion of the course.

§60.2906   When must the operator training course be completed?

The operator training course must be completed by the latest of the three dates specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section.

(a) Six months after your OSWI unit startup.

(b) December 18, 2006.

(c) The date before an employee assumes responsibility for operating the OSWI unit or assumes responsibility for supervising the operation of the OSWI unit.

§60.2907   How do I obtain my operator qualification?

(a) You must obtain operator qualification by completing a training course that satisfies the criteria under §60.2905(c).

(b) Qualification is valid from the date on which the training course is completed and the operator successfully passes the examination required under §60.2905(c)(2).

§60.2908   How do I maintain my operator qualification?

To maintain qualification, you must complete an annual review or refresher course covering, at a minimum, the five topics described in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section.

(a) Update of regulations.

(b) Incinerator operation, including startup and shutdown procedures, waste charging, and ash handling.

(c) Inspection and maintenance.

(d) Responses to malfunctions or conditions that may lead to malfunction.

(e) Discussion of operating problems encountered by attendees.

§60.2909   How do I renew my lapsed operator qualification?

You must renew a lapsed operator qualification by one of the two methods specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

(a) For a lapse of less than 3 years, you must complete a standard annual refresher course described in §60.2908.

(b) For a lapse of 3 years or more, you must repeat the initial qualification requirements in §60.2907(a).

§60.2910   What site-specific documentation is required?

(a) Documentation must be available at the facility and readily accessible for all OSWI unit operators that addresses the nine topics described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (9) of this section. You must maintain this information and the training records required by paragraph (c) of this section in a manner that they can be readily accessed and are suitable for inspection upon request.

(1) Summary of the applicable standards under this subpart.

(2) Procedures for receiving, handling, and charging waste.

(3) Incinerator startup, shutdown, and malfunction procedures.

(4) Procedures for maintaining proper combustion air supply levels.

(5) Procedures for operating the incinerator and associated air pollution control systems within the standards established under this subpart.

(6) Monitoring procedures for demonstrating compliance with the operating limits established under this subpart.

(7) Reporting and recordkeeping procedures.

(8) The waste management plan required under §§60.2899 through 60.2901.

(9) Procedures for handling ash.

(b) You must establish a program for reviewing the information listed in paragraph (a) of this section with each incinerator operator.

(1) The initial review of the information listed in paragraph (a) of this section must be conducted by December 18, 2006 or prior to an employee's assumption of responsibilities for operation of the OSWI unit, whichever date is later.

(2) Subsequent annual reviews of the information listed in paragraph (a) of this section must be conducted not later than 12 months following the previous review.

(c) You must also maintain the information specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Records showing the names of OSWI unit operators who have completed review of the information in paragraph (a) of this section as required by paragraph (b) of this section, including the date of the initial review and all subsequent annual reviews.

(2) Records showing the names of the OSWI unit operators who have completed the operator training requirements under §60.2905, met the criteria for qualification under §60.2907, and maintained or renewed their qualification under §60.2908 or §60.2909. Records must include documentation of training, the dates of the initial and refresher training, and the dates of their qualification and all subsequent renewals of such qualifications.

(3) For each qualified operator, the phone and/or pager number at which they can be reached during operating hours.

§60.2911   What if all the qualified operators are temporarily not accessible?

If all qualified operators are temporarily not accessible (i.e., not at the facility and not able to be at the facility within 1 hour), you must meet one of the three criteria specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, depending on the length of time that a qualified operator is not accessible.

(a) When all qualified operators are not accessible for 12 hours or less, the OSWI unit may be operated by other plant personnel familiar with the operation of the OSWI unit who have completed review of the information specified in §60.2910(a) within the past 12 months. You do not need to notify the Administrator or include this as a deviation in your annual report.

(b) When all qualified operators are not accessible for more than 12 hours, but less than 2 weeks, the OSWI unit may be operated by other plant personnel familiar with the operation of the OSWI unit who have completed a review of the information specified in §60.2910(a) within the past 12 months. However, you must record the period when all qualified operators were not accessible and include this deviation in the annual report as specified under §60.2956.

(c) When all qualified operators are not accessible for 2 weeks or more, you must take the two actions that are described in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) Notify the Administrator of this deviation in writing within 10 days. In the notice, state what caused this deviation, what you are doing to ensure that a qualified operator is accessible, and when you anticipate that a qualified operator will be accessible.

(2) Submit a status report to EPA every 4 weeks outlining what you are doing to ensure that a qualified operator is accessible, stating when you anticipate that a qualified operator will be accessible and requesting approval from EPA to continue operation of the OSWI unit. You must submit the first status report 4 weeks after you notify the Administrator of the deviation under paragraph (c)(1) of this section. If EPA notifies you that your request to continue operation of the OSWI unit is disapproved, the OSWI unit may continue operation for 90 days, then must cease operation. Operation of the unit may resume if you meet the two requirements in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section.

(i) A qualified operator is accessible as required under §60.2905(a).

(ii) You notify EPA that a qualified operator is accessible and that you are resuming operation.

Emission Limitations and Operating Limits

§60.2915   What emission limitations must I meet and by when?

You must meet the emission limitations specified in table 1 of this subpart 60 days after your OSWI unit reaches the charge rate at which it will operate, but no later than 180 days after its initial startup.

§60.2916   What operating limits must I meet and by when?

(a) If you use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations, you must establish operating limits for four operating parameters (as specified in table 2 of this subpart) as described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section during the initial performance test.

(1) Maximum charge rate, calculated using one of the two different procedures in paragraphs (a)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section, as appropriate.

(i) For continuous and intermittent units, maximum charge rate is the average charge rate measured during the most recent performance test demonstrating compliance with all applicable emission limitations.

(ii) For batch units, maximum charge rate is the charge rate measured during the most recent performance test demonstrating compliance with all applicable emission limitations.

(2) Minimum pressure drop across the wet scrubber, which is calculated as the average pressure drop across the wet scrubber measured during the most recent performance test demonstrating compliance with the particulate matter emission limitations; or minimum amperage to the wet scrubber, which is calculated as the average amperage to the wet scrubber measured during the most recent performance test demonstrating compliance with the particulate matter emission limitations.

(3) Minimum scrubber liquor flow rate, which is calculated as the average liquor flow rate at the inlet to the wet scrubber measured during the most recent performance test demonstrating compliance with all applicable emission limitations.

(4) Minimum scrubber liquor pH, which is calculated as the average liquor pH at the inlet to the wet scrubber measured during the most recent performance test demonstrating compliance with the hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide emission limitations.

(b) You must meet the operating limits established during the initial performance test 60 days after your OSWI unit reaches the charge rate at which it will operate, but no later than 180 days after its initial startup.

§60.2917   What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

If you use an air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber or limit emissions in some other manner to comply with the emission limitations under §60.2915, you must petition EPA for specific operating limits, the values of which are to be established during the initial performance test and then continuously monitored thereafter. You must not conduct the initial performance test until after the petition has been approved by EPA. Your petition must include the five items listed in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section.

(a) Identification of the specific parameters you propose to use as operating limits.

(b) A discussion of the relationship between these parameters and emissions of regulated pollutants, identifying how emissions of regulated pollutants change with changes in these parameters, and how limits on these parameters will serve to limit emissions of regulated pollutants.

(c) A discussion of how you will establish the upper and/or lower values for these parameters that will establish the operating limits on these parameters.

(d) A discussion identifying the methods you will use to measure and the instruments you will use to monitor these parameters, as well as the relative accuracy and precision of these methods and instruments.

(e) A discussion identifying the frequency and methods for recalibrating the instruments you will use for monitoring these parameters.

§60.2918   What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

The emission limitations and operating limits apply at all times except during OSWI unit startups, shutdowns, or malfunctions.

Performance Testing

§60.2922   How do I conduct the initial and annual performance test?

(a) All performance tests must consist of a minimum of three test runs conducted under conditions representative of normal operations.

(b) All performance tests must be conducted using the methods in table 1 of this subpart.

(c) All performance tests must be conducted using the minimum run duration specified in table 1 of this subpart.

(d) Method 1 of appendix A of this part must be used to select the sampling location and number of traverse points.

(e) Method 3A or 3B of appendix A of this part must be used for gas composition analysis, including measurement of oxygen concentration. Method 3A or 3B of appendix A of this part must be used simultaneously with each method.

(f) All pollutant concentrations, except for opacity, must be adjusted to 7 percent oxygen using Equation 1 in “60.2975.

(g) Method 26A of appendix A of this part must be used for hydrogen chloride concentration analysis, with the additional requirements specified in paragraphs (g)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) The probe and filter must be conditioned prior to sampling using the procedure described in paragraphs (g)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) Assemble the sampling train(s) and conduct a conditioning run by collecting between 14 liters per minute (0.5 cubic feet per minute) and 30 liters per minute (1.0 cubic feet per minute) of gas over a one-hour period. Follow the sampling procedures outlined in section 8.1.5 of Method 26A of appendix A of this part. For the conditioning run, water can be used as the impinger solution.

(ii) Remove the impingers from the sampling train and replace with a fresh impinger train for the sampling run, leaving the probe and filter (and cyclone, if used) in position. Do not recover the filter or rinse the probe before the first run. Thoroughly rinse the impingers used in the preconditioning run with deionized water and discard these rinses.

(iii) The probe and filter assembly are conditioned by the stack gas and are not recovered or cleaned until the end of testing.

(2) For the duration of sampling, a temperature around the probe and filter (and cyclone, if used) between 120 °C (248 °F) and 134 °C (273 °F) must be maintained.

(3) If water droplets are present in the sample gas stream, the requirements specified in paragraphs (g)(3)(i) and (ii) of this section must be met.

(i) The cyclone described in section 6.1.4 of Method 26A of appendix A of this part must be used.

(ii) The post-test moisture removal procedure described in section 8.1.6 of Method 26A of appendix A of this part must be used.

§60.2923   How are the performance test data used?

You use results of performance tests to demonstrate compliance with the emission limitations in table 1 of this subpart.

Initial Compliance Requirements

§60.2927   How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the emission limitations and establish the operating limits?

You must conduct an initial performance test, as required under §60.8, to determine compliance with the emission limitations in table 1 of this subpart and to establish operating limits using the procedure in §60.2916 or §60.2917. The initial performance test must be conducted using the test methods listed in table 1 of this subpart and the procedures in §60.2922.

§60.2928   By what date must I conduct the initial performance test?

The initial performance test must be conducted within 60 days after your OSWI unit reaches the charge rate at which it will operate, but no later than 180 days after its initial startup.

Continuous Compliance Requirements

§60.2932   How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations and the operating limits?

(a) You must conduct an annual performance test for all of the pollutants in table 1 of this subpart for each OSWI unit to determine compliance with the emission limitations. The annual performance test must be conducted using the test methods listed in table 1 of this subpart and the procedures in 60.2922.

(b) You must continuously monitor carbon monoxide emissions to determine compliance with the carbon monoxide emissions limitation. Twelve-hour rolling average values are used to determine compliance. A 12-hour rolling average value above the carbon monoxide emission limit in table 1 of this subpart constitutes a deviation from the emission limitation.

(c) You must continuously monitor the operating parameters specified in §60.2916 or established under §60.2917. Three-hour rolling average values are used to determine compliance with the operating limits unless a different averaging period is established under §60.2917. A 3-hour rolling average value (unless a different averaging period is established under §60.2917) above the established maximum or below the established minimum operating limits constitutes a deviation from the established operating limits. Operating limits do not apply during performance tests.

§60.2933   By what date must I conduct the annual performance test?

You must conduct annual performance tests within 12 months following the initial performance test. Conduct subsequent annual performance tests within 12 months following the previous one.

§60.2934   May I conduct performance testing less often?

(a) You can test less often for a given pollutant if you have test data for at least three consecutive annual tests, and all performance tests for the pollutant over that period show that you comply with the emission limitation. In this case, you do not have to conduct a performance test for that pollutant for the next 2 years. You must conduct a performance test during the 3rd year and no more than 36 months following the previous performance test.

(b) If your OSWI unit continues to meet the emission limitation for the pollutant, you may choose to conduct performance tests for that pollutant every 3rd year, but each test must be within 36 months of the previous performance test.

(c) If a performance test shows a deviation from an emission limitation for any pollutant, you must conduct annual performance tests for that pollutant until three consecutive annual performance tests for that pollutant all show compliance.

§60.2935   May I conduct a repeat performance test to establish new operating limits?

Yes, you may conduct a repeat performance test at any time to establish new values for the operating limits. The Administrator may request a repeat performance test at any time.

Monitoring

§60.2939   What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

(a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must monitor the oxygen concentration at each location where you monitor carbon monoxide.

(b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in §60.13.

§60.2940   How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

(a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen.

(b) Complete your initial evaluation of the continuous emission monitoring systems within 60 days after your OSWI unit reaches the maximum load level at which it will operate, but no later than 180 days after its initial startup.

(c) For initial and annual evaluations, collect data concurrently (or within 30 to 60 minutes) using your carbon monoxide and oxygen continuous emission monitoring systems. To validate carbon monoxide concentration levels, use EPA Method 10, 10A, or 10B of appendix A of this part. Use EPA Method 3 or 3A to measure oxygen. Collect the data during each initial and annual evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring systems following the applicable performance specifications in appendix B of this part. table 3 of this subpart shows the required span values and performance specifications that apply to each continuous emission monitoring system.

(d) Follow the quality assurance procedures in Procedure 1 of appendix F of this part for each continuous emission monitoring system. The procedures include daily calibration drift and quarterly accuracy determinations.

§60.2941   What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

(a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after the previous evaluation was conducted.

(b) Evaluate your continuous emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part.

§60.2942   What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection requirement enforceable?

(a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make sure the averages for carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen. Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen.

(b) Obtain at least two data points per hour in order to calculate a valid 1-hour arithmetic average. Section 60.13(e)(2) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording) for each 15-minute period.

(c) Obtain valid 1-hour averages for at least 75 percent of the operating hours per day for at least 90 percent of the operating days per calendar quarter. An operating day is any day the unit combusts any municipal or institutional solid waste.

(d) If you do not obtain the minimum data required in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, you have deviated from the data collection requirement regardless of the emission level monitored.

(e) If you do not obtain the minimum data required in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, you must still use all valid data from the continuous emission monitoring systems in calculating emission concentrations.

(f) If continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements, refer to table 3 of this subpart. It shows alternate methods for collecting data when systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or zero and span checks keep you from collecting the minimum amount of data.

§60.2943   How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into the appropriate averaging times and units?

(a) Use Equation 1 in §60.2975 to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen.

(b) Use Equation 2 in §60.2975 to calculate the 12-hour rolling averages for concentrations of carbon monoxide.

§60.2944   What operating parameter monitoring equipment must I install, and what operating parameters must I monitor?

(a) If you are using a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations under §60.2915, you must install, calibrate (to manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate devices (or establish methods) for monitoring the value of the operating parameters used to determine compliance with the operating limits listed in table 2 of this subpart. These devices (or methods) must measure and record the values for these operating parameters at the frequencies indicated in table 2 of this subpart at all times.

(b) You must install, calibrate (to manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate a device or method for measuring the use of any stack that could be used to bypass the control device. The measurement must include the date, time, and duration of the use of the bypass stack.

(c) If you are using a method or air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations under §60.2915, you must install, calibrate (to the manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate the equipment necessary to monitor compliance with the site-specific operating limits established using the procedures in §60.2917.

§60.2945   Is there a minimum amount of operating parameter monitoring data I must obtain?

(a) Except for monitor malfunctions, associated repairs, and required quality assurance or quality control activities (including, as applicable, calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments of the monitoring system), you must conduct all monitoring at all times the OSWI unit is operating.

(b) You must obtain valid monitoring data for at least 75 percent of the operating hours per day for at least 90 percent of the operating days per calendar quarter. An operating day is any day the unit combusts any municipal or institutional solid waste.

(c) If you do not obtain the minimum data required in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, you have deviated from the data collection requirement regardless of the operating parameter level monitored.

(d) Do not use data recorded during monitor malfunctions, associated repairs, and required quality assurance or quality control activities for meeting the requirements of this subpart, including data averages and calculations. You must use all the data collected during all other periods in assessing compliance with the operating limits.

Recordkeeping and Reporting

§60.2949   What records must I keep?

You must maintain the 15 items (as applicable) as specified in paragraphs (a) through (o) of this section for a period of at least 5 years.

(a) Calendar date of each record.

(b) Records of the data described in paragraphs (b)(1) through (8) of this section.

(1) The OSWI unit charge dates, times, weights, and hourly charge rates.

(2) Liquor flow rate to the wet scrubber inlet every 15 minutes of operation, as applicable.

(3) Pressure drop across the wet scrubber system every 15 minutes of operation or amperage to the wet scrubber every 15 minutes of operation, as applicable.

(4) Liquor pH as introduced to the wet scrubber every 15 minutes of operation, as applicable.

(5) For OSWI units that establish operating limits for controls other than wet scrubbers under §60.2917, you must maintain data collected for all operating parameters used to determine compliance with the operating limits.

(6) All 1-hour average concentrations of carbon monoxide emissions.

(7) All 12-hour rolling average values of carbon monoxide emissions and all 3-hour rolling average values of continuously monitored operating parameters.

(8) Records of the dates, times, and durations of any bypass of the control device.

(c) Identification of calendar dates and times for which continuous emission monitoring systems or monitoring systems used to monitor operating limits were inoperative, inactive, malfunctioning, or out of control (except for downtime associated with zero and span and other routine calibration checks). Identify the pollutant emissions or operating parameters not measured, the duration, reasons for not obtaining the data, and a description of corrective actions taken.

(d) Identification of calendar dates, times, and durations of malfunctions, and a description of the malfunction and the corrective action taken.

(e) Identification of calendar dates and times for which monitoring data show a deviation from the carbon monoxide emissions limit in table 1 of this subpart or a deviation from the operating limits in table 2 of this subpart or a deviation from other operating limits established under §60.2917 with a description of the deviations, reasons for such deviations, and a description of corrective actions taken.

(f) Calendar dates when continuous monitoring systems did not collect the minimum amount of data required under §§60.2942 and 60.2945.

(g) For carbon monoxide continuous emissions monitoring systems, document the results of your daily drift tests and quarterly accuracy determinations according to Procedure 1 of appendix F of this part.

(h) Records of the calibration of any monitoring devices required under §60.2944.

(i) The results of the initial, annual, and any subsequent performance tests conducted to determine compliance with the emission limits and/or to establish operating limits, as applicable. Retain a copy of the complete test report including calculations and a description of the types of waste burned during the test.

(j) All documentation produced as a result of the siting requirements of §§60.2894 and 60.2895.

(k) Records showing the names of OSWI unit operators who have completed review of the information in §60.2910(a) as required by §60.2910(b), including the date of the initial review and all subsequent annual reviews.

(l) Records showing the names of the OSWI unit operators who have completed the operator training requirements under §60.2905, met the criteria for qualification under §60.2907, and maintained or renewed their qualification under §60.2908 or §60.2909. Records must include documentation of training, the dates of the initial and refresher training, and the dates of their qualification and all subsequent renewals of such qualifications.

(m) For each qualified operator, the phone and/or pager number at which they can be reached during operating hours.

(n) Equipment vendor specifications and related operation and maintenance requirements for the incinerator, emission controls, and monitoring equipment.

(o) The information listed in §60.2910(a).

§60.2950   Where and in what format must I keep my records?

(a) You must keep each record on site for at least 2 years. You may keep the records off site for the remaining 3 years.

(b) All records must be available in either paper copy or computer-readable format that can be printed upon request, unless an alternative format is approved by the Administrator.

§60.2951   What reports must I submit?

See table 4 of this subpart for a summary of the reporting requirements.

§60.2952   What must I submit prior to commencing construction?

You must submit a notification prior to commencing construction that includes the five items listed in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section.

(a) A statement of intent to construct.

(b) The anticipated date of commencement of construction.

(c) All documentation produced as a result of the siting requirements of §60.2895.

(d) The waste management plan as specified in §§60.2899 through 60.2901.

(e) Anticipated date of initial startup.

§60.2953   What information must I submit prior to initial startup?

You must submit the information specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section prior to initial startup.

(a) The type(s) of waste to be burned.

(b) The maximum design waste burning capacity.

(c) The anticipated maximum charge rate.

(d) If applicable, the petition for site-specific operating limits under §60.2917.

(e) The anticipated date of initial startup.

§60.2954   What information must I submit following my initial performance test?

You must submit the information specified in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section no later than 60 days following the initial performance test. All reports must be signed by the facilities manager.

(a) The complete test report for the initial performance test results obtained under §60.2927, as applicable.

(b) The values for the site-specific operating limits established in §60.2916 or §60.2917.

§60.2955   When must I submit my annual report?

You must submit an annual report no later than 12 months following the submission of the information in §60.2954. You must submit subsequent reports no more than 12 months following the previous report.

§60.2956   What information must I include in my annual report?

The annual report required under §60.2955 must include the ten items listed in paragraphs (a) through (j) of this section. If you have a deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations, you must also submit deviation reports as specified in §§60.2957 through 60.2959.

(a) Company name and address.

(b) Statement by the owner or operator, with their name, title, and signature, certifying the truth, accuracy, and completeness of the report. Such certifications must also comply with the requirements of 40 CFR 70.5(d) or 40 CFR 71.5(d).

(c) Date of report and beginning and ending dates of the reporting period.

(d) The values for the operating limits established pursuant to §60.2916 or §60.2917.

(e) If no deviation from any emission limitation or operating limit that applies to you has been reported, a statement that there was no deviation from the emission limitations or operating limits during the reporting period, and that no monitoring system used to determine compliance with the emission limitations or operating limits was inoperative, inactive, malfunctioning or out of control.

(f) The highest recorded 12-hour average and the lowest recorded 12-hour average, as applicable, for carbon monoxide emissions and the highest recorded 3-hour average and the lowest recorded 3-hour average, as applicable, for each operating parameter recorded for the calendar year being reported.

(g) Information recorded under §60.2949(b)(6) and (c) through (e) for the calendar year being reported.

(h) If a performance test was conducted during the reporting period, the results of that test.

(i) If you met the requirements of §60.2934(a) or (b), and did not conduct a performance test during the reporting period, you must state that you met the requirements of §60.2934(a) or (b), and, therefore, you were not required to conduct a performance test during the reporting period.

(j) Documentation of periods when all qualified OSWI unit operators were unavailable for more than 12 hours, but less than 2 weeks.

§60.2957   What else must I report if I have a deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations?

(a) You must submit a deviation report if any recorded 3-hour average parameter level is above the maximum operating limit or below the minimum operating limit established under this subpart, if any recorded 12-hour average carbon monoxide emission rate is above the emission limitation, if the control device was bypassed, or if a performance test was conducted that showed a deviation from any emission limitation.

(b) The deviation report must be submitted by August 1 of that year for data collected during the first half of the calendar year (January 1 to June 30), and by February 1 of the following year for data you collected during the second half of the calendar year (July 1 to December 31).

§60.2958   What must I include in the deviation report?

In each report required under §60.2957, for any pollutant or operating parameter that deviated from the emission limitations or operating limits specified in this subpart, include the seven items described in paragraphs (a) through (g) of this section.

(a) The calendar dates and times your unit deviated from the emission limitations or operating limit requirements.

(b) The averaged and recorded data for those dates.

(c) Durations and causes of each deviation from the emission limitations or operating limits and your corrective actions.

(d) A copy of the operating limit monitoring data during each deviation and any test report that documents the emission levels.

(e) The dates, times, number, duration, and causes for monitor downtime incidents (other than downtime associated with zero, span, and other routine calibration checks).

(f) Whether each deviation occurred during a period of startup, shutdown, or malfunction, or during another period.

(g) The dates, times, and durations of any bypass of the control device.

§60.2959   What else must I report if I have a deviation from the requirement to have a qualified operator accessible?

(a) If all qualified operators are not accessible for 2 weeks or more, you must take the two actions in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) Submit a notification of the deviation within 10 days that includes the three items in paragraphs (a)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) A statement of what caused the deviation.

(ii) A description of what you are doing to ensure that a qualified operator is accessible.

(iii) The date when you anticipate that a qualified operator will be available.

(2) Submit a status report to EPA every 4 weeks that includes the three items in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) A description of what you are doing to ensure that a qualified operator is accessible.

(ii) The date when you anticipate that a qualified operator will be accessible.

(iii) Request approval from EPA to continue operation of the OSWI unit.

(b) If your unit was shut down by EPA, under the provisions of §60.2911(c)(2), due to a failure to provide an accessible qualified operator, you must notify EPA that you are resuming operation once a qualified operator is accessible.

§60.2960   Are there any other notifications or reports that I must submit?

Yes, you must submit notifications as provided by §60.7.

§60.2961   In what form can I submit my reports?

Submit initial, annual, and deviation reports electronically or in paper format, postmarked on or before the submittal due dates.

§60.2962   Can reporting dates be changed?

If the Administrator agrees, you may change the semiannual or annual reporting dates. See §60.19(c) for procedures to seek approval to change your reporting date.

Title V Operating Permits

§60.2966   Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my unit?

Yes, if you are subject to this subpart, you are required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit unless you meet the relevant requirements for an exemption specified in §60.2887.

§60.2967   When must I submit a title V permit application for my new unit?

(a) If your new unit subject to this subpart is not subject to an earlier permit application deadline, a complete title V permit application must be submitted on or before one of the dates specified in paragraphs (a)(1) or (2) of this section. (See section 503(c) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.5(a)(1)(i) and 40 CFR 71.5(a)(1)(i).)

(1) For a unit that commenced operation as a new source as of December 16, 2005, then a complete title V permit application must be submitted not later than December 18, 2006.

(2) For a unit that does not commence operation as a new source until after December 16, 2005, then a complete title V permit application must be submitted not later than 12 months after the date the unit commences operation as a new source.

(b) If your new unit subject to this subpart is subject to title V as a result of some triggering requirement(s) other than this subpart (for example, a unit subject to this subpart may be a major source or part of a major source), then your unit may be required to apply for a title V permit prior to the deadlines specified in paragraph (a) of this section. If more than one requirement triggers a source's obligation to apply for a title V permit, the 12-month timeframe for filing a title V permit application is triggered by the requirement that first causes the source to be subject to title V. (See section 503(c) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.3(a) and (b), 40 CFR 70.5(a)(1)(i), 40 CFR 71.3(a) and (b), and 40 CFR 71.5(a)(1)(i).)

(c) A “complete” title V permit application is one that has been determined or deemed complete by the relevant permitting authority under section 503(d) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.5(a)(2) or 40 CFR 71.5(a)(2). You must submit a complete permit application by the relevant application deadline in order to operate after this date in compliance with Federal law. (See sections 503(d) and 502(a) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR 70.7(b) and 40 CFR 71.7(b).)

Temporary-Use Incinerators and Air Curtain Incinerators Used in Disaster Recovery

§60.2969   What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in disaster recovery?

Your incinerator or air curtain incinerator is excluded from the requirements of this subpart if it is used on a temporary basis to combust debris from a disaster or emergency such as a tornado, hurricane, flood, ice storm, high winds, or act of bioterrorism. To qualify for this exclusion, the incinerator or air curtain incinerator must be used to combust debris in an area declared a State of Emergency by a local or State government, or the President, under the authority of the Stafford Act, has declared that an emergency or a major disaster exists in the area, and you must follow the requirements specified in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section.

(a) If the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is used during a period that begins on the date the unit started operation and lasts 8 weeks or less within the boundaries of the same emergency or disaster declaration area, then it is excluded from the requirements of this subpart. You do not need to notify the Administrator of its use or meet the emission limitations or other requirements of this subpart.

(b) If the incinerator or air curtain incinerator will be used during a period that begins on the date the unit started operation and lasts more than 8 weeks within the boundaries of the same emergency or disaster declaration area, you must notify the Administrator that the temporary-use incinerator or air curtain incinerator will be used for more than 8 weeks and request permission to continue to operate the unit as specified in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) The notification must be submitted in writing by the date 8 weeks after you start operation of the temporary-use incinerator or air curtain incinerator within the boundaries of the current emergency or disaster declaration area.

(2) The notification must contain the date the incinerator or air curtain incinerator started operation within the boundaries of the current emergency or disaster declaration area, identification of the disaster or emergency for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief description of the size and design of the unit (for example, an air curtain incinerator or a modular starved-air incinerator), the reasons the incinerator or air curtain incinerator must be operated for more than 8 weeks, and the amount of time for which you request permission to operate including the date you expect to cease operation of the unit.

(c) If you submitted the notification containing the information in paragraph (b)(2) by the date specified in paragraph (b)(1), you may continue to operate the incinerator or air curtain incinerator for another 8 weeks, which is a total of 16 weeks from the date the unit started operation within the boundaries of the current emergency or disaster declaration area. You do not have to meet the emission limitations or other requirements of this subpart during this period.

(1) At the end of 16 weeks from the date the incinerator or air curtain incinerator started operation within the boundaries of the current emergency or disaster declaration area, you must cease operation of the unit or comply with all requirements of this subpart, unless the Administrator has approved in writing your request to continue operation.

(2) If the Administrator has approved in writing your request to continue operation, then you may continue to operate the incinerator or air curtain incinerator within the boundaries of the current emergency or disaster declaration area until the date specified in the approval, and you do not need to comply with any other requirements of this subpart during the approved time period.

Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste

§60.2970   What is an air curtain incinerator?

(a) An air curtain incinerator operates by forcefully projecting a curtain of air across an open, integrated combustion chamber (fire box) or open pit or trench (trench burner) in which combustion occurs. For the purpose of this subpart and subpart FFFF of this part only, air curtain incinerators include both firebox and trench burner units.

(b) Air curtain incinerators that burn only the materials listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section are required to meet only the requirements in §§60.2970 through 60.2974 and are exempt from all other requirements of this subpart.

(1) 100 percent wood waste.

(2) 100 percent clean lumber.

(3) 100 percent yard waste.

(4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste.

§60.2971   What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?

(a) Within 60 days after your air curtain incinerator reaches the charge rate at which it will operate, but no later than 180 days after its initial startup, you must meet the two limitations specified in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) The opacity limitation is 10 percent (6-minute average), except as described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(2) The opacity limitation is 35 percent (6-minute average) during the startup period that is within the first 30 minutes of operation.

(b) The limitations in paragraph (a) of this section apply at all times except during malfunctions.

§60.2972   How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?

(a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this part to determine compliance with the opacity limitation.

(b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in §60.8.

(c) After the initial test for opacity, conduct annual tests no more than 12 months following the date of your previous test.

(d) If the air curtain incinerator has been out of operation for more than 12 months following the date of the previous test, then you must conduct a test for opacity upon startup of the unit.

§60.2973   What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?

(a) Prior to commencing construction on your air curtain incinerator, submit the three items described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Notification of your intent to construct the air curtain incinerator.

(2) Your planned initial startup date.

(3) Types of materials you plan to burn in your air curtain incinerator.

(b) Keep records of results of all initial and annual opacity tests in either paper copy or computer-readable format that can be printed upon request, unless the Administrator approves another format, for at least 5 years. You must keep each record on site for at least 2 years. You may keep the records off site for the remaining 3 years.

(c) Make all records available for submittal to the Administrator or for an inspector's review.

(d) You must submit the results (each 6-minute average) of the initial opacity tests no later than 60 days following the initial test. Submit annual opacity test results within 12 months following the previous report.

(e) Submit initial and annual opacity test reports as electronic or paper copy on or before the applicable submittal date.

(f) Keep a copy of the initial and annual reports on site for a period of 5 years. You must keep each report on site for at least 2 years. You may keep the reports off site for the remaining 3 years.

§60.2974   Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste?

Yes, if your air curtain incinerator is subject to this subpart, you are required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit as specified in §§60.2966 and 60.2967.

Equations

§60.2975   What equations must I use?

(a) Percent oxygen. Adjust all pollutant concentrations to 7 percent oxygen using equation 1 of this section.

eCFR graphic er16de05.000.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Cadj = pollutant concentration adjusted to 7 percent oxygen

Cmeas = pollutant concentration measured on a dry basis

(20.9-7) = 20.9 percent oxygen-7 percent oxygen (defined oxygen correction basis)

20.9 = oxygen concentration in air, percent

%O2 = oxygen concentration measured on a dry basis, percent

(b) Capacity of a very small municipal waste combustion unit. For very small municipal waste combustion units that can operate continuously for 24-hour periods, calculate the unit capacity based on 24 hours of operation at the maximum charge rate. To determine the maximum charge rate, use one of two methods:

(1) For very small municipal waste combustion units with a design based on heat input capacity, calculate the maximum charging rate based on the maximum heat input capacity and one of two heating values:

(i) If your very small municipal waste combustion unit combusts refuse-derived fuel, use a heating value of 12,800 kilojoules per kilogram (5,500 British thermal units per pound).

(ii) If your very small municipal waste combustion unit combusts municipal solid waste, use a heating value of 10,500 kilojoules per kilogram (4,500 British thermal units per pound).

(2) For very small municipal waste combustion units with a design not based on heat input capacity, use the maximum design charging rate.

(c) Capacity of a batch very small municipal waste combustion unit. Calculate the capacity of a batch OSWI unit as the maximum design amount of municipal solid waste it can charge per batch multiplied by the maximum number of batches it can process in 24 hours. Calculate the maximum number of batches by dividing 24 by the number of hours needed to process one batch. Retain fractional batches in the calculation. For example, if one batch requires 16 hours, the unit can combust 24/16, or 1.5 batches, in 24 hours.

(d) Carbon monoxide pollutant rate. When hourly average pollutant rates (Eh) are obtained (e.g., CEMS values), compute the rolling average carbon monoxide pollutant rate (Ea) for each 12-hour period using the following equation:

eCFR graphic er16de05.001.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Ea = Average carbon monoxide pollutant rate for the 12-hour period, ppm corrected to 7 percent O2.

Ehj = Hourly arithmetic average pollutant rate for hour “j,” ppm corrected to 7 percent O2.

Definitions

§60.2977   What definitions must I know?

Terms used but not defined in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act and subpart A (General Provisions) of this part.

Administrator means:

(1) For approved and effective State section 111(d)/129 plans, the Director of the State air pollution control agency, or his or her delegatee;

(2) For Federal section 111(d)/129 plans, the Administrator of the EPA, an employee of the EPA, the Director of the State air pollution control agency, or employee of the State air pollution control agency to whom the authority has been delegated by the Administrator of the EPA to perform the specified task; and

(3) For NSPS, the Administrator of the EPA, an employee of the EPA, the Director of the State air pollution control agency, or employee of the State air pollution control agency to whom the authority has been delegated by the Administrator of the EPA to perform the specified task.

Air curtain incinerator means an incineration unit operating by forcefully projecting a curtain of air across an open, integrated combustion chamber (fire box) or open pit or trench (trench burner) in which combustion occurs. For the purpose of this subpart and subpart FFFF of this part only, air curtain incinerators include both firebox and trench burner units.

Auxiliary fuel means natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, fuel oil, or diesel fuel.

Batch OSWI unit means an OSWI unit that is designed such that neither waste charging nor ash removal can occur during combustion.

Calendar quarter means three consecutive months (nonoverlapping) beginning on: January 1, April 1, July 1, or October 1.

Calendar year means 365 consecutive days starting on January 1 and ending on December 31.

Chemotherapeutic waste means waste material resulting from the production or use of anti-neoplastic agents used for the purpose of stopping or reversing the growth of malignant cells.

Class II municipal solid waste landfill means a landfill that meets four criteria:

(1) Accepts, for incineration or disposal, less than 20 tons per day of municipal solid waste or other solid wastes based on an annual average;

(2) Is located on a site where there is no evidence of groundwater pollution caused or contributed to by the landfill;

(3) Is not connected by road to a Class I municipal solid waste landfill, as defined by Alaska regulatory code 18 AAC 60.300(c) or, if connected by road, is located more than 50 miles from a Class I municipal solid waste landfill; and

(4) Serves a community that meets one of two criteria:

(i) Experiences for at least three months each year, an interruption in access to surface transportation, preventing access to a Class I municipal solid waste landfill; or

(ii) Has no practicable waste management alternative, with a landfill located in an area that annually receives 25 inches or less of precipitation.

Class III municipal solid waste landfill is a landfill that is not connected by road to a Class I municipal solid waste landfill, as defined by Alaska regulatory code 18 AAC 60.300(c) or, if connected by road, is located more than 50 miles from a Class I municipal solid waste landfill, and that accepts, for disposal, either of the following two criteria:

(1) Ash from incinerated municipal waste in quantities less than 1 ton per day on an annual average, which ash must be free of food scraps that might attract animals; or

(2) Less than 5 tons per day of municipal solid waste, based on an annual average, and is not located in a place that meets either of the following criteria:

(i) Where public access is restricted, including restrictions on the right to move to the place and reside there; or

(ii) That is provided by an employer and that is populated totally by persons who are required to reside there as a condition of employment and who do not consider the place to be their permanent residence.

Clean lumber means wood or wood products that have been cut or shaped and include wet, air-dried, and kiln-dried wood products. Clean lumber does not include wood products that have been painted, pigment-stained, or pressure-treated by compounds such as chromate copper arsenate, pentachlorophenol, and creosote, or manufactured wood products that contain adhesives or resins (e.g., plywood, particle board, flake board, and oriented strand board).

Collected from means the transfer of material from the site at which the material is generated to a separate site where the material is burned.

Contained gaseous material means gases that are in a container when that container is combusted.

Continuous emission monitoring system or CEMS means a monitoring system for continuously measuring and recording the emissions of a pollutant from an OSWI unit.

Continuous OSWI unit means an OSWI unit that is designed to allow waste charging and ash removal during combustion.

Deviation means any instance in which a unit that meets the requirements in §60.2885, or an owner or operator of such a source:

(1) Fails to meet any requirement or obligation established by this subpart, including but not limited to any emission limitation, operating limit, or operator qualification and accessibility requirements;

(2) Fails to meet any term or condition that is adopted to implement an applicable requirement in this subpart and that is included in the operating permit for any unit that meets the requirements in §60.2885 and is required to obtain such a permit; or

(3) Fails to meet any emission limitation, operating limit, or operator qualification and accessibility requirement in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction, regardless of whether or not such failure is allowed by this subpart.

Dioxins/furans means tetra- through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans.

Energy recovery means the process of recovering thermal energy from combustion for useful purposes such as steam generation or process heating.

EPA means the Administrator of the EPA or employee of the EPA that is delegated the authority to perform the specified task.

Institutional facility means a land-based facility owned and/or operated by an organization having a governmental, educational, civic, or religious purpose such as a school, hospital, prison, military installation, church, or other similar establishment or facility.

Institutional waste means solid waste (as defined in this subpart) that is combusted at any institutional facility using controlled flame combustion in an enclosed, distinct operating unit: whose design does not provide for energy recovery (as defined in this subpart); operated without energy recovery (as defined in this subpart); or operated with only waste heat recovery (as defined in this subpart). Institutional waste also means solid waste (as defined in this subpart) combusted on site in an air curtain incinerator that is a distinct operating unit of any institutional facility.

Institutional waste incineration unit means any combustion unit that combusts institutional waste (as defined in this subpart) and is a distinct operating unit of the institutional facility that generated the waste. Institutional waste incineration units include field-erected, modular, cyclonic burn barrel, and custom built incineration units operating with starved or excess air, and any air curtain incinerator that is a distinct operating unit of the institutional facility that generated the institutional waste (except those air curtain incinerators listed in §60.2888(b)).

Intermittent OSWI unit means an OSWI unit that is designed to allow waste charging, but not ash removal, during combustion.

Low-level radioactive waste means waste material that contains radioactive nuclides emitting primarily beta or gamma radiation, or both, in concentrations or quantities that exceed applicable Federal or State standards for unrestricted release. Low-level radioactive waste is not high-level radioactive waste, spent nuclear fuel, or byproduct material as defined by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2014(e)(2)).

Malfunction means any sudden, infrequent, and not reasonably preventable failure of air pollution control equipment, process equipment, or a process to operate in a normal or usual manner. Failures that are caused, in part, by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions.

Metropolitan Statistical Area means any areas listed as metropolitan statistical areas in OMB Bulletin No. 05-02 entitled “Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses” dated February 22, 2005 (available on the Web at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/bulletins/).

Modification or modified unit means an incineration unit you have changed on or after June 16, 2006 and that meets one of two criteria:

(1) The cumulative cost of the changes over the life of the unit exceeds 50 percent of the original cost of building and installing the unit (not including the cost of land) updated to current costs (current dollars). For an OSWI unit, to determine what systems are within the boundary of the unit used to calculate these costs, see the definition of OSWI unit.

(2) Any physical change in the unit or change in the method of operating it that increases the amount of any air pollutant emitted for which section 129 or section 111 of the Clean Air Act has established standards.

Municipal solid waste means refuse (and refuse-derived fuel) collected from the general public and from residential, commercial, institutional, and industrial sources consisting of paper, wood, yard wastes, food wastes, plastics, leather, rubber, and other combustible materials and non-combustible materials such as metal, glass and rock, provided that: (1) the term does not include industrial process wastes or medical wastes that are segregated from such other wastes; and (2) an incineration unit shall not be considered to be combusting municipal solid waste for purposes of this subpart if it combusts a fuel feed stream, 30 percent or less of the weight of which is comprised, in aggregate, of municipal solid waste, as determined by §60.2887(b).

Municipal waste combustion unit means, for the purpose of this subpart and subpart FFFF of this part, any setting or equipment that combusts municipal solid waste (as defined in this subpart) including, but not limited to, field-erected, modular, cyclonic burn barrel, and custom built incineration units (with or without energy recovery) operating with starved or excess air, boilers, furnaces, pyrolysis/combustion units, and air curtain incinerators (except those air curtain incinerators listed in §60.2888(b)).

Other solid waste incineration (OSWI) unit means either a very small municipal waste combustion unit or an institutional waste incineration unit, as defined in this subpart. Unit types listed in §60.2887 as being excluded from the subpart are not OSWI units subject to this subpart. While not all OSWI units will include all of the following components, an OSWI unit includes, but is not limited to, the municipal or institutional solid waste feed system, grate system, flue gas system, waste heat recovery equipment, if any, and bottom ash system. The OSWI unit does not include air pollution control equipment or the stack. The OSWI unit boundary starts at the municipal or institutional waste hopper (if applicable) and extends through two areas:

(1) The combustion unit flue gas system, which ends immediately after the last combustion chamber or after the waste heat recovery equipment, if any; and

(2) The combustion unit bottom ash system, which ends at the truck loading station or similar equipment that transfers the ash to final disposal. The OSWI unit includes all ash handling systems connected to the bottom ash handling system.

Particulate matter means total particulate matter emitted from OSWI units as measured by Method 5 or Method 29 of appendix A of this part.

Pathological waste means waste material consisting of only human or animal remains, anatomical parts, and/or tissue, the bags/containers used to collect and transport the waste material, and animal bedding (if applicable).

Reconstruction means rebuilding an incineration unit and meeting two criteria:

(1) The reconstruction begins on or after June 16, 2006.

(2) The cumulative cost of the construction over the life of the incineration unit exceeds 50 percent of the original cost of building and installing the unit (not including land) updated to current costs (current dollars). For an OSWI unit, to determine what systems are within the boundary of the unit used to calculate these costs, see the definition of OSWI unit.

Refuse-derived fuel means a type of municipal solid waste produced by processing municipal solid waste through shredding and size classification. This includes all classes of refuse-derived fuel including two fuels:

(1) Low-density fluff refuse-derived fuel through densified refuse-derived fuel.

(2) Pelletized refuse-derived fuel.

Shutdown means the period of time after all waste has been combusted in the primary chamber. For continuous OSWI, shutdown shall commence no less than 2 hours after the last charge to the incinerator. For intermittent OSWI, shutdown shall commence no less than 4 hours after the last charge to the incinerator. For batch OSWI, shutdown shall commence no less than 5 hours after the high-air phase of combustion has been completed.

Solid waste means any garbage, refuse, sludge from a waste treatment plant, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility and other discarded material, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting from industrial, commercial, mining, agricultural operations, and from community activities, but does not include solid or dissolved material in domestic sewage, or solid or dissolved materials in irrigation return flows or industrial discharges that are point sources subject to permits under section 402 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1342), or source, special nuclear, or byproduct material as defined by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2014).

Standard conditions, when referring to units of measure, means a temperature of 68 °F (20 °C) and a pressure of 1 atmosphere (101.3 kilopascals).

Startup period means the period of time between the activation of the system and the first charge to the OSWI unit. For batch OSWI, startup means the period of time between activation of the system and ignition of the waste.

Very small municipal waste combustion unit means any municipal waste combustion unit that has the capacity to combust less than 35 tons per day of municipal solid waste or refuse-derived fuel, as determined by the calculations in §60.2975.

Waste heat recovery means the process of recovering heat from the combustion flue gases outside of the combustion firebox by convective heat transfer only.

Wet scrubber means an add-on air pollution control device that utilizes an aqueous or alkaline scrubbing liquor to collect particulate matter (including nonvaporous metals and condensed organics) and/or to absorb and neutralize acid gases.

Wood waste means untreated wood and untreated wood products, including tree stumps (whole or chipped), trees, tree limbs (whole or chipped), bark, sawdust, chips, scraps, slabs, millings, and shavings. Wood waste does not include:

(1) Grass, grass clippings, bushes, shrubs, and clippings from bushes and shrubs from residential, commercial/retail, institutional, or industrial sources as part of maintaining yards or other private or public lands.

(2) Construction, renovation, or demolition wastes.

(3) Clean lumber.

(4) Treated wood and treated wood products, including wood products that have been painted, pigment-stained, or pressure treated by compounds such as chromate copper arsenate, pentachlorophenol, and creosote, or manufactured wood products that contain adhesives or resins (e.g., plywood, particle board, flake board, and oriented strand board).

Yard waste means grass, grass clippings, bushes, shrubs, and clippings from bushes and shrubs. Yard waste comes from residential, commercial/retail, institutional, or industrial sources as part of maintaining yards or other private or public lands. Yard waste does not include two items:

(1) Construction, renovation, and demolition wastes.

(2) Clean lumber.

Table 1 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Emission Limitations

As stated in §60.2915, you must comply with the following:

For the air pollutant You must meet this emission
limitationa
Using this averaging time And determining
compliance using this method
1. Cadmium18 micrograms per dry standard cubic meter3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 29 of appendix A of this part.
2. Carbon monoxide40 parts per million by dry volume3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run during performance test), and 12-hour rolling averages measured using CEMS.bMethod 10, 10A, or 10B of appendix A of this part and CEMS.
3. Dioxins/furans (total basis)33 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter3-run average (1 hour minimum sample meter time per run)Method 23 of appendix A of this part.
4. Hydrogen chloride15 parts per million by dry volume3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 26A of appendix A of this part.
5. Lead226 micrograms per dry standard cubic meter3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 29 of appendix A of this part.
6. Mercury74 micrograms per dry standard cubic meter3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 29 of appendix A of this part.
7. Opacity10 percent6-minute average (observe over three 1-hour test runs; i.e., thirty 6-minute averages)Method 9 of appendix A of this part.
8. Oxides of nitrogen103 parts per million by dry volume3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 7, 7A, 7C, 7D, or 7E of appendix A of this part, or ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981 (IBR, see §60.17(h)) in lieu of Methods 7 and 7C only.
9. Particulate matter0.013 grains per dry standard cubic foot3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 5 or 29 of appendix A of this part.
10. Sulfur dioxide3.1 parts per million by dry volume3-run average (1 hour minimum sample time per run)Method 6 or 6C of appendix A of this part, or ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981 (IBR, see §60.17(h)) in lieu of Method 6 only.

aAll emission limitations (except for opacity) are measured at 7 percent oxygen, dry basis at standard conditions.

bCalculated each hour as the average of the previous 12 operating hours.

Table 2 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

As stated in §60.2916, you must comply with the following:

For these operating
parameters
You must establish these operating limitsAnd monitoring using these minimum frequencies
Data measurementData recordingAveraging time
1. Charge rateMaximum charge rateContinuousEvery hourDaily for batch units. 3-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent unitsa.
2. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubberMinimum pressure drop or amperageContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour rollinga.
3. Scrubber liquor flow rateMinimum flow rateContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour rollinga.
4. Scrubber liquor pHMinimum pHContinuousEvery 15 minutes3-hour rollinga.

aCalculated each hour as the average of the previous 3 operating hours.

Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

As stated in §60.2940, you must comply with the following:

For the following
pollutants
Use the following span values for your CEMSUse the following performance specifications (P.S.) in appendix B of this part for your CEMSIf needed to meet minimum data requirements, use the following alternate methods in appendix A of this part to collect data
1. Carbon Monoxide125 percent of the maximum hourly potential carbon monoxide emissions of the waste combustion unitP.S.4AMethod 10.
2. Oxygen25 percent oxygenP.S.3Method 3A or 3B, or ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981 (IBR, see §60.17(h)) in lieu of Method 3B only.

Table 4 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Summary of Reporting Requirements

As stated in §60.2951, you must comply with the following:

Report Due date Contents Reference
1. Preconstruction reporta. Prior to commencing constructioni. Statement of intent to construct;
ii. Anticipated date of commencement of onstruction;
§60.2952.
§60.2952.
   iii. Documentation for siting requirements;§60.2952.
   iv. Waste management plan; and§60.2952.
   v. Anticipated date of initial startup.§60.2952.
2. Startup notificationa. Prior to initial startupi. Types of waste to be burned;
ii. Maximum design waste burning capacity;
§60.2953.
§60.2953.
   iii. Anticipated maximum charge rate;§60.2953.
   iv. If applicable, the petition for site-specific operating limits; and§60.2953.
   v. Anticipated date of initial startup.§60.2953.
3. Initial test reporta. No later than 60 days following the initial performance testi. Complete test report for the initial performance test; and
ii. The values for the site-specific operating limits
§60.2954.
   
§60.2954.
4. Annual reporta. No later than 12 months following the submission of the initial test report. Subsequent reports are to be submitted no more than 12 months following the previous reporti. Company Name and address;
   
ii. Statement and signature by the owner or operator;
iii. Date of report;
   
iv. Values for the operating limits;
   
v. If no deviations or malfunctions were reported, a statement that no deviations occurred during the reporting period;
§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   
§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   
§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   
§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   vi. Highest and lowest recorded 12-hour averages, as applicable, for carbon monoxide emissions and highest and lowest recorded 3-hour averages, as applicable, for each operating parameter recorded for the calendar year being reported;§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   vii. Information for deviations or malfunctions recorded under §60.2949(b)(6) and (c) through (e);§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   viii. If a performance test was conducted during the reporting period, the results of the test;§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   ix. If a performance test was not conducted during the reporting period, a statement that the requirements of §60.2934 (a) or (b) were met; and§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
   x. Documentation of periods when all qualified OSWI unit operators were unavailable for more than 12 hours but less than 2 weeks.§§60.2955 and 60.2956.
5. Emission limitation or operating limit deviation reporta. By August 1 of that year for data collected during the first half of the calendar year. By February 1 of the following year for data collected during the second half of the calendar yeari. Dates and times of deviation;
   
ii. Averaged and recorded data for those dates;
iii. Duration and causes of each deviation and the corrective actions taken;
iv. Copy of operating limit monitoring data and any test reports;
v. Dates, times, and causes for monitor downtimes incidents;
vi. Whether each deviation occurred during a period of startup, shutdown, or malfunction; and
§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
   
§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
   
§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
   
§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
   
§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
   vii. Dates, times, and durations of any bypass of the control device.§§60.2957 and 60.2958.
6. Qualified operator deviation notificationa. Within 10 days of deviationi. Statement of cause of deviation;
ii. Description of efforts to have an accessible qualified operator; and
§60.2959(a)(1).
§60.2959(a)(1)
   iii. The date a qualified operator will be accessible§60.2959(a)(1).
7. Qualified operation deviation status reporta. Every 4 weeks following deviationi. Description of efforts to have an accessible qualified operator;
ii. The date a qualified operator will be accessible; and
§60.2959(a)(2).
   
§60.2959(a)(2).
   iii. Request to continue operation§60.2959(a)(2).
8. Qualified operator deviation notification of resumed operationa. Prior to resuming operationi. Notification that you are resuming operation§60.2959(b).

Note: This table is only a summary, see the referenced sections of the rule for the complete requirements.

[70 FR 74892, Dec. 16, 2005, as amended at 71 FR 67806, Nov. 24, 2006]



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