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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of October 16, 2014

Title 43Subtitle BChapter I → Part 429


Title 43: Public Lands: Interior


PART 429—USE OF BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES


Contents

Subpart A—Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability

§429.1   What is the purpose of this part?
§429.2   What definitions are used in this part?
§429.3   What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?
§429.4   What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?
§429.5   Who is authorized to issue use authorizations under this part?
§429.6   When must water user organizations also approve use authorizations?

Subpart B—Proposed Uses Involving Reclamation Easements

§429.7   Can I use land where Reclamation holds an easement?
§429.8   Is there a fee for uses involving a Reclamation easement?

Subpart C—Requesting Authorization to Use Reclamation Land, Facilities, and Waterbodies

§429.9   What should I do before filing an application?
§429.10   What application form should I use?
§429.11   Where can I get the application forms?
§429.12   Where do I file my application?
§429.13   How long will the application review process take?
§429.14   What criteria will Reclamation consider when reviewing applications?
§429.15   Is Reclamation required to issue a use authorization?

Subpart D—Application Fees and Administrative Costs

§429.16   How much is the application fee and when should it be paid?
§429.17   When will Reclamation collect administrative costs?
§429.18   When do I have to pay the administrative costs?
§429.19   What happens if the initial estimate for administrative costs is insufficient?
§429.20   Can I get a detailed explanation of the administrative costs?
§429.21   If I overpay Reclamation's administrative costs, can I get a refund?
§429.22   Can Reclamation charge me additional administrative costs after I receive a use authorization?

Subpart E—Use Fees

§429.23   How does Reclamation determine use fees?
§429.24   When should I pay my use fee?
§429.25   How long do I have to submit my payment for the use fee and accept the offered use authorization?

Subpart F—Reductions or Waivers of Application Fees, Administrative Costs, and Use Fees

§429.26   When may Reclamation reduce or waive costs or fees?

Subpart G—Terms and Conditions of Use Authorizations

§429.27   What general information appears in use authorizations?
§429.28   What terms and conditions apply to all use authorizations?
§429.29   What other terms and conditions may be included in my use authorization?
§429.30   May use authorizations be transferred or assigned to others?

Subpart H—Prohibited and Unauthorized Uses of Reclamation Land, Facilities, and Waterbodies

§429.31   What uses are prohibited on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies?
§429.32   How will Reclamation address currently authorized existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses?
§429.33   What are the consequences for using Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies without authorization?

Subpart I—Decisions and Appeals

§429.34   Who is the decisionmaker for Reclamation's final determinations?
§429.35   May I appeal Reclamation's final determination?
§429.36   May I appeal the Commissioner's decision?
§429.37   Does interest accrue on monies owed to the United States during my appeal process?

Authority: 43 U.S.C. 373; 43 U.S.C. 373b; 43 U.S.C. 387; 43 CFR part 21; Public Law 108-447, Title VIII; 31 U.S.C. 9701, as amended.

Source: 73 FR 74335, Dec. 5, 2008, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability

§429.1   What is the purpose of this part?

The purpose of this part is to notify the public that any possession or occupancy of any portion of, and the extraction or disturbance of any natural resources from Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies are prohibited without written authorization from Reclamation, unless excepted as listed in §429.4. This part describes:

(a) How to apply to Reclamation for a use authorization to allow your activity on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies;

(b) How Reclamation reviews and processes your application, including the criteria for approval or denial of your application;

(c) The requirement for collection of application and use fees and the recovery of administrative costs;

(d) How Reclamation determines and collects costs and fees;

(e) Prohibited uses on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies;

(f) How Reclamation will address existing authorized uses which are otherwise prohibited, including the criteria for approval or denial of requests to renew these use authorizations;

(g) The process and penalties associated with resolution of unauthorized uses; and

(h) How to appeal an action or determination made under this part.

§429.2   What definitions are used in this part?

The following definitions are used in this part:

Administrative costs means all costs incurred by Reclamation in processing your application and all costs associated with evaluating, issuing, monitoring, and terminating your use authorization on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies. Administrative costs are distinct and separate from application and use fees and typically include, but are not limited to:

(1) Determining the use fee;

(2) Evaluating and documenting environmental and cultural resources compliance;

(3) Performing engineering review;

(4) Preparation of the use authorization; and

(5) Personnel and indirect costs directly associated with these actions.

Applicant means you as any person or entity (such as a private citizen, business, non-governmental organization, public entity, Indian tribe, or foreign government) who submits an application requesting use of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies.

Application means either Form 7-2540 or SF 299. The choice of application form is dependent on the type of use requested.

Application fee means a $100 nonrefundable charge, which you must submit with your application to cover the costs of our initial review of your request. Application fees are distinct and separate from administrative costs and use fees.

Commissioner means the senior executive of the Bureau of Reclamation, Department of the Interior.

Consent document means a written agreement or notification listing conditions which will prevent unreasonable interference with our easement on non-Reclamation land.

Cultural resource means any prehistoric, historic, architectural, sacred, or traditional cultural property and associated objects and documents that are of interest to archaeology, anthropology, history, or other associated disciplines. Cultural resources include archaeological resources, historic properties, traditional cultural properties, sacred sites, and cultural landscapes that are associated with human activity or occupation.

Easement refers to an interest in land that consists of the right to use or control the land for a specific purpose, but does not constitute full ownership of the land.

Environmental compliance means complying with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act; the Endangered Species Act; the Clean Water Act; the Clean Air Act; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act; applicable regulations associated with these statutes; and other related laws and regulations.

Form 7-2540 means the Bureau of Reclamation Right-of-Use Application form required for all proposed uses of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies, except those associated with construction and/or placement of transportation, communication, and utility systems and facilities.

Grantee means you as the recipient or holder of a use authorization regardless of the contractual format.

Interior means the United States Department of the Interior.

Managing partner means a Federal or non-Federal public entity that manages land, facilities, or waterbodies through a management agreement with Reclamation entered into pursuant to the Federal Water Project Recreation Act, as amended.

Part 21 of this title means title 43 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 21, which is titled Occupancy of Cabin Sites on Public Conservation and Recreation Areas.

Part 423 of this chapter means title 43 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 423, which is titled Public Conduct on Bureau of Reclamation Facilities, Lands, and Waterbodies.

Possession or occupancy and possess or occupy mean to control, use, or reside on Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies.

Private exclusive recreational or residential use means any use that involves structures or other improvements used for recreational or residential purposes to the exclusion of public uses that are not associated with the official management of a Reclamation project. This includes, but is not limited to the following:

(1) Cabin sites and associated improvements (including those currently defined in part 21 of this title); mobile homes, residences, outbuildings, and related structures; and associated landscaping, patios, decks, and porches;

(2) Boat houses, docks, moorings, piers, and launch ramps;

(3) Floating structures or buildings, including moored vessels used as residences or unauthorized business sites;

(4) Sites for such activities as hunting, fishing, camping, and picnicking (other than transitory uses allowed under part 423 of this chapter) that attempt to exclude general public access; and

(5) Access routes to private land, facilities, or structures when other reasonable alternative means of access is available or can be obtained.

Public entity means States, political subdivisions or agencies thereof; public and quasi-governmental authorities and agencies; and agencies of the Federal Government.

Public needs mean the recreational requirements of the general public at areas where existing authorized private exclusive recreational or residential uses are present.

Reclamation means the Bureau of Reclamation, United States Department of the Interior.

Reclamation facility means any facility under our jurisdiction. The term includes, but is not limited to, buildings, canals, dams, ditches, drains, fish and wildlife facilities, laterals, powerplants, pumping plants, recreation facilities, roads, switchyards, transmission and telecommunication lines, and warehouses.

Reclamation land means any land under the jurisdiction of, or administered by, Reclamation and may include, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) All land acquired by Reclamation through purchase, condemnation, exchange, or donation for Reclamation project and water related purposes;

(2) All land withdrawn by Reclamation from the public domain for Reclamation purposes; and

(3) All interests in land acquired by Reclamation, including easements and rights exercised by the United States under the 1890 Canal Act (43 U.S.C. 945).

Reclamation law means the Reclamation Act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat. 388, 43 U.S.C. 371 et seq.), and all Acts which supplement or amend the 1902 Act.

Reclamation project means any land, facilities, or waterbodies used for water supply, water delivery, flood control, hydropower, or other authorized purposes including fish, wildlife, and recreation administered by Reclamation under Federal laws.

Reclamation waterbodies means any body of water situated on Reclamation land and under Reclamation jurisdiction. Examples of Reclamation waterbodies include, but are not limited to, reservoirs, lakes, and impoundments.

Regional Director means any one of the representatives of the Commissioner, or their delegates, who are responsible for managing their respective region's land, facilities, and waterbodies and for the decisions made under this part.

Standard Form (SF) 299 means the form titled Application for Transportation and Utility Systems and Facilities on Federal Lands used when requesting permission for construction and/or placement of transportation, communication, or utility systems and facilities.

Unauthorized use means use of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies without proper authorization.

Use authorization means a document that defines the terms and conditions under which we will allow you to use Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies. Use authorizations can take the form of easements, leases, licenses, permits, and consent documents. This document is also referred to as a “right-of-use” in part 423 of this chapter.

Use fee means the amount due to Reclamation for the use of Federal land, facilities, or waterbodies under our jurisdiction or control. Use fees are distinct and separate from application fees and administrative costs.

Valuation means the method used to establish the fee for a use authorization by appraisal, waiver valuation, or other sound or generally accepted business practice.

Water user organization means any legal entity established under State law that has entered into a contract with the United States pursuant to the Federal reclamation laws.

We, us, or our mean Reclamation.

You, your, I, me, or my, mean an applicant, grantee, or unauthorized user.

§429.3   What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

Possession or occupancy of, or extraction or removal of natural resources from, Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies require a use authorization in accordance with this part. Typical uses of or activities on Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies regulated by this part include, but are not limited to the following:

(a) Commercial filming and photography;

(b) Commercial guiding and outfitting;

(c) Commercial or organized sporting events;

(d) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses;

(e) Infrastructure, such as transportation, telecommunications, utilities, and pipelines;

(f) Organized recreational activities, public gatherings, and other special events that involve the possession or occupancy of Reclamation lands;

(g) Removal of, or exploration for, sand, gravel, and other mineral resources;

(h) Timber harvesting, or removal of commercial forest products or other vegetative resources; and

(i) Any other uses deemed appropriate by Reclamation, subject to the exclusions listed in §429.4.

§429.4   What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

(a) Individual, non-commercial use of Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies for occasional activities such as hiking, camping for periods of 14 days or less during any period of 30 consecutive days, sightseeing, picnicking, hunting, swimming, boating, and fishing, consistent with applicable laws, regulations and policies. Public conduct associated with these activities is governed by part 423 of this chapter;

(b) Buildings and structures used by concessionaires or managing partners to facilitate their operations or that are made available by them for the general, non-exclusive use of the public. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

(1) Boat docks available for short-term use by the public;

(2) Marina slips available for rent by the public;

(3) Publicly available boat ramps;

(4) Houseboats available for short-term rent by the public;

(5) Stores and restaurants;

(6) Employee housing; and

(7) Rental cabins, hotels, campgrounds, and other short-term lodging facilities.

(c) While not subject to other requirements and processes established under this part, the following types of uses must be in compliance with the requirements in subpart H of this part:

(1) Recreational activities at sites managed by non-Federal managing partners under Public Law 89-72, titled Federal Water Project Recreation Act, July 9, 1965;

(2) Activities managed by other Federal agencies or Interior bureaus by agreement or under other authority;

(3) Activities at sites directly managed by Reclamation where fees or fee schedules are established for general public recreation use;

(4) Uses authorized under concession contracts on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies;

(5) Reclamation contracts for water supply or water operations;

(6) Authorized operation and maintenance activities on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies undertaken by water user organizations, or their contractors, or by Reclamation contractors;

(7) Agreements and real property interests granted for the replacement or relocation of facilities, such as highways, railroads, telecommunication, or transmission lines or infrastructure governed by Section 14 of the Reclamation Project Act of August 4, 1939 (43 U.S.C. 389). Payments to equalize land values may still be required and administrative costs may still be recovered; and

(8) Activities specifically authorized under other Federal statutes or regulations.

§429.5   Who is authorized to issue use authorizations under this part?

Unless otherwise provided by law or regulation, only Reclamation or another Federal agency acting for Reclamation under delegated authority is authorized to issue use authorizations that convey an interest in Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies. Recreation managing partners under the Federal Water Projects Recreation Act, 16 U.S.C. 4601 et seq., and water user organizations who have assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies, and provide a copy of the use authorization to the local Reclamation office, pursuant to a contract with Reclamation may issue limited use authorizations to third parties for activities on Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies when all of the following apply:

(a) The recreation managing partner or water user organization is authorized to do so under its contract with Reclamation;

(b) Such limited use authorizations do not convey ownership or other interest in the Federal real property;

(c) The uses authorized are not permanent or for an indefinite period;

(d) The limited use authorization does not provide for an automatic right of renewal;

(e) The limited use authorization is fully revocable at the discretion of Reclamation; and

(f) All revenues collected for the use of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies are handled in compliance with all statutory, regulatory, and policy requirements.

§429.6   When must water user organizations also approve use authorizations?

(a) Use authorizations for easements and rights-of-way for periods in excess of 25 years are also subject to approval from water user organizations under contract obligation for repayment of the project or division. This requirement does not apply to any other type of use authorizations.

(b) At a minimum, the appropriate water user organizations will be notified of all use authorizations prior to their issuance to avoid potential conflicts between the requested use authorization and the water user organizations' need to operate and maintain the facilities for which they have contractual responsibility.

(c) At the discretion of the responsible Regional Director, concurrence of the appropriate water user organizations not addressed in paragraph (a) of this section may be requested.

Subpart B—Proposed Uses Involving Reclamation Easements

§429.7   Can I use land where Reclamation holds an easement?

(a) To prevent conflicts where Reclamation holds an easement on land owned by others, you should submit an application for the proposed use. If after review of the application, Reclamation determines that your requested use would not unreasonably interfere with Reclamation's easement, a consent document may be issued to you. The consent document will contain the conditions with which you must comply to ensure that your use will not unreasonably interfere with Reclamation's use of its easement.

(b) In accordance with subpart C of this part, you should submit either SF 299 or Form 7-2540 to the local Reclamation office to request a consent document.

(c) If you are not the underlying landowner, you must also secure the permission of the landowner for your requested use of the area covered by Reclamation's easement.

§429.8   Is there a fee for uses involving a Reclamation easement?

Reclamation will not charge a use fee for a consent document. However, depending upon the complexity of your requested use and issues associated with it, Reclamation may charge an application fee and administrative costs, unless waived in accordance with subpart F of this part.

Subpart C—Requesting Authorization to Use Reclamation Land, Facilities, and Waterbodies

§429.9   What should I do before filing an application?

Before filing an application, it is important that you contact the local Reclamation office to discuss your proposed use. This discussion can help expedite your application process.

§429.10   What application form should I use?

You must use one of the following application forms depending on the nature of your requested use:

(a) Use SF 299 to request a use authorization for the placement, construction, and use of energy, transportation, water, or telecommunication systems and facilities on or across all Federal property including Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies.

Examples of such uses are:

(1) Canals;

(2) Communication towers;

(3) Fiber-optics cable;

(4) Pipelines;

(5) Roads;

(6) Telephone lines; and

(7) Utilities and utility corridors.

(b) Use Form 7-2540 to request any other type of use authorization. Examples of such uses are:

(1) Commercial filming and photography;

(2) Commercial guiding and outfitting;

(3) Commercial or organized sporting events;

(4) Grazing, farming, and other agricultural uses;

(5) Organized recreational activities, public gatherings, and other special events;

(6) Removal of, or exploration for, sand, gravel, and other mineral materials;

(7) Timber harvesting, or removal of commercial forest products or other vegetative resources; and

(8) Any other uses deemed appropriate by Reclamation.

(c) Application forms may not be required where Reclamation solicits competitive bids.

§429.11   Where can I get the application forms?

Both forms can be obtained from any Reclamation office or from our official internet Web site at http://www.usbr.gov. These forms contain specific instructions for application submission and describe information that you must furnish. However, when you submit either form to your local Reclamation office for review, the form must contain your original signature as the applicant.

§429.12   Where do I file my application?

File your completed and signed application, including the $100 nonrefundable application fee, with the Reclamation office having jurisdiction over the land, facility, or waterbody associated with your request. Reclamation office locations may be found on http://www.usbr.gov, the official Reclamation Internet Web site.

§429.13   How long will the application review process take?

(a) Reclamation will acknowledge in writing your completed and signed application and application fee within 30 calendar days of receipt. Reclamation may request additional information needed to process your application, such as legal land descriptions and detailed construction specifications.

(b) The processing time depends upon the complexity of your requested use, issues associated with it, and the need for additional information from you.

(c) Should your requested use be denied at any time during the review process, Reclamation will notify you in writing of the basis for the denial.

§429.14   What criteria will Reclamation consider when reviewing applications?

Reclamation will consider the following criteria when reviewing applications:

(a) Compatibility with authorized project purposes, project operations, safety, and security;

(b) Environmental compliance;

(c) Compatibility with public interests;

(d) Conflicts with Federal policies and initiatives;

(e) Public health and safety;

(f) Availability of other reasonable alternatives; and

(g) Best interests of the United States.

§429.15   Is Reclamation required to issue a use authorization?

No. The issuance of a use authorization is at Reclamation's discretion. At a minimum, the criteria listed at §429.14 must be considered prior to issuance of any use authorizations. Not all requests will be authorized. If issued, Reclamation will provide only the least estate, right, or possessory interest needed to accommodate the approved use.

Subpart D—Application Fees and Administrative Costs

§429.16   How much is the application fee and when should it be paid?

You must remit a nonrefundable application fee of $100 to cover costs associated with our initial review of your application, unless the payment is waived pursuant to subpart F of this part. This initial review will determine if your requested use is appropriate for consideration and not likely to interfere with Reclamation project purposes or operations.

§429.17   When will Reclamation collect administrative costs?

Reclamation will collect, in advance, its administrative costs for processing your application, except as provided under subpart F of this part.

§429.18   When do I have to pay the administrative costs?

(a) Following the initial review, you will be notified in writing whether your application appears to be appropriate for further processing. At that time, Reclamation will give you an initial estimate of administrative costs required to continue processing your application.

(b) You must pay these initial, estimated administrative costs before Reclamation can continue to process your application, unless you are granted a waiver of administrative costs under subpart F of this part. If payment is not received within 90 days after the estimate is provided to you, Reclamation may close your file. If this occurs and you later wish to proceed, you must submit both a new application and another $100 nonrefundable application fee.

§429.19   What happens if the initial estimate for administrative costs is insufficient?

If the initial estimate to cover Reclamation's administrative costs is found to be insufficient, Reclamation will notify you in writing of the additional amount needed. You must pay the amount requested before Reclamation will continue processing your application.

§429.20   Can I get a detailed explanation of the administrative costs?

Yes, you are entitled to receive an explanation of all administrative costs relevant to your specific application. You must request this information in writing from the Reclamation office where you submitted your application.

§429.21   If I overpay Reclamation's administrative costs, can I get a refund?

If, in reviewing your application, Reclamation uses all the monies you have paid, you will not receive a refund regardless of whether you receive a use authorization. If the money collected from you exceeds administrative costs, a refund of the excess amount will be made to you consistent with Reclamation's financial policies.

§429.22   Can Reclamation charge me additional administrative costs after I receive a use authorization?

(a) After you receive your use authorization, Reclamation may charge you for additional administrative costs incurred for activities such as:

(1) Monitoring your authorized use over time to ensure compliance with the terms and conditions of your use authorization; and

(2) Periodic analysis of your long-term use to adjust your use fee to reflect current conditions.

(b) If your additional payment is not received by Reclamation within 90 days after notification to you in writing of the additional administrative costs, Reclamation may take action to terminate your use authorization.

Subpart E—Use Fees

§429.23   How does Reclamation determine use fees?

The use fee is based on a valuation or by competitive bidding. Use fees may be adjusted as deemed appropriate by Reclamation to reflect current conditions, as provided in the use authorization.

§429.24   When should I pay my use fee?

(a) If Reclamation offers you a use authorization, you must pay the use fee in advance, unless you are granted a waiver under subpart F of this part.

(b) Your use authorization will clearly state the use fee. Should periodic payments apply, your use authorization will also describe when you should pay those periodic use fees.

§429.25   How long do I have to submit my payment for the use fee and accept the offered use authorization?

You have 90 days to accept and return the use authorization and required fees, otherwise Reclamation may consider the offer to be rejected by you and your file may be closed. If this occurs and you later wish to proceed, you must submit a new application and another $100 nonrefundable application fee. You may not commence your use of Reclamation's land, facilities, or waterbodies until Reclamation has issued a use authorization to you. A use authorization will only be issued upon receipt by Reclamation of all required costs and fees, and the use authorization signed by you.

Subpart F—Reductions or Waivers of Application Fees, Administrative Costs, and Use Fees

§429.26   When may Reclamation reduce or waive costs or fees?

(a) As determined appropriate and approved and documented by the applicable Regional Director, the application fees may be waived, and charges for administrative costs or use fees may be waived or reduced as indicated by a in the following table:

Situations where costs and fees may be reduced or waivedApplication feeAdministrative costsUse fee
(1) The use is a courtesy to a foreign government or if comparable fees are set on a reciprocal basis with a foreign government
(2) The use is so minor or short term that the cost of collecting fees is equal to or greater than the value of the use
(3) The use will benefit the general public with no specific entity or group of beneficiaries readily identifiable
(4) Applicant is a public entity or Indian tribe
(5) Applicant is a non-profit or educational entity and the use provides a general public benefit
(6) Applicant is a rural electric association or municipal utility or cooperative
(7) The use directly supports United States' programs or projects
(8) The use secures a reciprocal land use of equal or greater value to the United States
(9) Applicant for a consent document is the underlying owner of the property subject to Reclamation's easement(1)
(10) The use is issued under competitive bidding(2)

1Not applicable.

2Set by Bid.

(b) When a statute, executive order, or court order authorizes the use and requires specific treatment of administrative cost recovery and collection of use fees associated with that use, that requirement will be followed by Reclamation.

Subpart G—Terms and Conditions of Use Authorizations

§429.27   What general information appears in use authorizations?

Each use authorization will contain:

(a) An adequate description of the land, facilities, or waterbodies where the use will occur;

(b) A description of the specific use being authorized together with applicable restrictions or conditions that must be adhered to;

(c) The conditions under which the use authorization may be renewed, terminated, amended, assigned or transferred, and/or have the use fee adjusted; and

(d) Primary points of contact and other terms and conditions.

§429.28   What terms and conditions apply to all use authorizations?

(a) By accepting a use authorization under this part, you agree to comply with and be bound by the following terms and conditions during all construction, operation, maintenance, use, and termination activities:

(1) The grantee agrees to indemnify the United States for, and hold the United States and all of its representatives harmless from, all damages resulting from suits, actions, or claims of any character brought on account of any injury to any person or property arising out of any act, omission, neglect, or misconduct in the manner or method of performing any construction, care, operation, maintenance, supervision, examination, inspection, or other activities of the grantee.

(2) The United States, acting through Reclamation, Department of the Interior, reserves rights to construct, operate, and maintain public works now or hereafter authorized by the Congress without liability for termination of the use authorization or other damage to the grantee's activities or facilities.

(3) Reclamation may, at any time and at no cost or liability to the United States, terminate any use authorization in the event of a natural disaster, a national emergency, a need arising from security requirements, or an immediate and overriding threat to public health and safety.

(4) Reclamation may, at any time and at no cost or liability to the United States, terminate any use authorization for activities other than existing authorized private exclusive recreational or residential use as defined under §429.2 if Reclamation determines that any of the following apply:

(i) The use has become incompatible with authorized project purposes, project operations, safety, and security;

(ii) A higher public use is identified through a public process described at §429.32(a)(1); or

(iii) Termination is necessary for operational needs of the project.

(5) Reclamation may, at any time and at no cost or liability to the United States, terminate any use authorization if Reclamation determines that the grantee has failed to use the use authorization for its intended purpose. Further, failure to construct within the timeframe specified in the terms of the use authorization may constitute a presumption of abandonment of the requested use and cause termination of the use authorization.

(6) Reclamation may, at any time and at no cost or liability to the United States, terminate any use authorization if the grantee fails to comply with all applicable Federal, State, and local laws, regulations, ordinances, or terms and conditions of any use authorization, or to obtain any required permits or authorizations.

(b) The Regional Director may, upon advice of the Solicitor, modify these terms and conditions with respect to the contents of the use authorization to meet local and special conditions.

§429.29   What other terms and conditions may be included in my use authorization?

Reclamation may include additional terms, conditions, or requirements that address environmental law compliance, the protection of cultural and natural resources, other interests of the United States, and local laws and regulations.

§429.30   May use authorizations be transferred or assigned to others?

Your use authorization may not be transferred or assigned to others without prior written approval of Reclamation, unless specifically provided for in your use authorization or as provided under subpart H of this part for existing private exclusive recreational and residential uses. Should you wish to transfer or assign your use authorization to another individual or entity, you must contact the Reclamation office that issued your use authorization prior to taking such action.

Subpart H—Prohibited and Unauthorized Uses of Reclamation Land, Facilities, and Waterbodies

§429.31   What uses are prohibited on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies?

(a) Reclamation prohibits any use that would not comply with part 423 of this chapter.

(b) Reclamation prohibits any use that would result in new private exclusive recreational or residential use of Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies as of the effective date of this part. Improvements that are within the terms and conditions of an existing authorization will not be considered new private exclusive recreational or residential use.

§429.32   How will Reclamation address currently authorized existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses?

The administration and potential renewal of use authorizations, existing as of January 1, 2008, for private exclusive recreational or residential uses of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies, as defined in this part, will be administered in accordance with the following requirements.

(a) Existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses must be compatible with public needs and with authorized project purposes, project operations, safety, and security. A review of whether existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses is compatible with public needs and authorized project purposes, project operations, safety, and security will be made at least once every 20 years, except where part 21 requires a more frequent review.

(1) Reclamation will only make final determinations regarding the compatibility of existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses with public needs or project purposes through a public process involving one or more public meetings. Examples of such public processes include resource management plan development, recreation demand analysis studies, and project feasibility studies.

(2) Reclamation will notify in writing all potentially affected holders of existing authorizations for private exclusive recreational or residential use regarding the opportunities for public participation when any action is proposed that could lead to an incompatibility determination.

(3) Determinations that existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses are not compatible with public needs will be published in the Federal Register.

(4) If a determination of incompatibility with public needs is made, affected use authorizations may be extended up to 5 years from the date of publication in the Federal Register, if the Regional Director determines that such extension is necessary to the fair and efficient administration of this part.

(b) Reclamation will conduct a compliance review of all existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses at least once every 5 years to determine if the following criteria are being met:

(1) Environmental requirements;

(2) Public health and safety requirements; and

(3) Current in financial obligations to Reclamation.

(c) Reclamation will provide the holder of the use authorization with a written report of the results of the compliance review by certified mail, return receipt requested. The report will state whether the existing use meets the required criteria listed in paragraph (b) of this section and will list any deficiencies that can be corrected. A minimum of 90 days will be provided to make corrections identified in the report. Failure to correct the deficiencies within the time provided in the report will result in termination of the use authorization.

(d) In addition to the compliance reviews described above, Reclamation will initiate a review of the existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses for compliance with the required criteria listed in paragraph (b) of this section at least 6 months prior to the expiration date of the existing use authorization. Reclamation will provide the holder of the use authorization with a written report of the results of the compliance review results by certified mail, return receipt requested. The report will state whether the existing use meets the required criteria under this section as applicable and will list any deficiencies that must be corrected prior to a renewal of the use authorization. A minimum of 90 days will be provided prior to the expiration of the permit to make corrections identified in the report. In addition, this report will serve as a reminder that it is time to seek renewal of the use authorization and provide information on the process that needs to be followed.

(e) Reclamation must be notified in advance by certified mail, return receipt requested, of any transfers of use authorizations for existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses.

(f) Any renewal of use authorizations for existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies will not exceed 20-year terms. Any such renewals will be subject to the periodic reviews described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and these reviews could potentially result in the termination of the use agreement prior to the end of the term of years.

(g) Upon non-renewal or termination of a use authorization for an existing private exclusive recreational or residential use of Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies, the grantee will remove any improvements from the site within 90 days from the date of termination or non-renewal of the use authorization. The grantee will return the property as near as possible to its original undisturbed condition. Any property not removed within 90 days may be removed by Reclamation at the expense of the prior grantee.

(h) Renewal decisions of use authorizations for existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses located on Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies will be made by the Regional Director. If the Regional Director determines that deficiencies identified under paragraph (d) of this section cannot be corrected prior to the expiration date of the use authorization, the use authorization may be extended for a period not to exceed 6 months.

(i) Requests for the renewal, extension, or reissuance of use authorizations for private exclusive recreational or residential uses that expired and were not renewed prior to the effective date of this part and were not renewed or are subsequently not renewed or terminated under the procedures of this section will be considered requests for uses prohibited under §429.31 and will not be approved. Conversely, requests for the renewal, extension, or reissuance of use authorizations for private exclusive recreational or residential uses that were in existence on the effective date of these regulations and that are in compliance with all requirements of the applicable use authorization at the time a request is made will not be considered requests for uses prohibited under §429.31. Requests for renewal, extension, or reissuance of use authorizations for private exclusive recreational or residential uses must be made by submitting Form 7-2540 as stated under §429.10(b) and in compliance with subpart D of this part.

(j) Unauthorized existing private exclusive recreational or residential uses will be administered under §§429.31 and 429.33 and part 423 of this chapter.

§429.33   What are the consequences for using Reclamation land, facilities, and waterbodies without authorization?

(a) Reclamation may seek to collect the following:

(1) All administrative costs incurred by Reclamation in resolving the unauthorized use;

(2) All costs of removing structures, materials, improvements, or any other real or personal property;

(3) All costs of rehabilitation of the land, facilities, or waterbodies as required by Reclamation.

(4) The use fee that would have applied had your use been authorized from the date your unauthorized use began;

(5) Interest accrued on the use fee from the date your unauthorized use began as specified in paragraph (a)(4) of this section; and

(6) The interest charge rate shall be the greater of either the rate prescribed quarterly in the Federal Register by the Department of the Treasury for application to overdue payments or the interest rate of 0.5 percent per month. The interest charge rate will be determined as of the due date and remain fixed for the duration of the delinquent period.

(b) As an unauthorized user, you will receive a written notice in which Reclamation will outline the steps you need to perform to cease your unauthorized use.

(c) If appropriate, you will receive a final determination letter detailing the applicable costs and fees, as set forth under paragraph (a) of this section, which must be paid to Reclamation for your unauthorized use. Payment must be made within 30 days of receipt of this letter unless Reclamation extends this deadline in writing. Failure to make timely payment may result in administrative or legal action being taken against you.

(d) Reclamation may determine that issuing a use authorization to you for an existing unauthorized use is not appropriate; and may deny future use applications by you because of this behavior. As noted at §429.15, use authorizations are always issued at Reclamation's discretion.

(e) If, however, your unauthorized use is deemed by Reclamation to be an unintentional mistake, consideration may be given to issuing a use authorization provided that you qualify and meet the criteria at §429.14; and, in addition to the normal costs, you agree to pay the following:

(1) The use fee that would have been owed from the date your unauthorized use began; and

(2) Interest accrued on the use fee from the date your unauthorized use began as specified in paragraph (f)(1) of this section.

(f) Under no circumstances will your unauthorized use or payment of monies to the United States in association with an unauthorized use either:

(1) Create any legal interest or color of title against the United States; or

(2) Establish any right or preference to continue the unauthorized use.

(g) Under part 423 of this chapter, unauthorized use of Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies is a trespass against the United States. You may be subject to legal action including criminal prosecution as specified under §423.71.

Subpart I—Decisions and Appeals

§429.34   Who is the decisionmaker for Reclamation's final determinations?

(a) The appropriate Regional Director, or the Regional Director's designee, makes any final determination associated with an action taken under this rule and will send that final determination in writing to you by mail.

(b) The Regional Director's final determination will take effect upon the date of the final determination letter.

§429.35   May I appeal Reclamation's final determination?

(a) Yes, if you are directly affected by a final determination, you may appeal by writing to the Commissioner within 30 calendar days after the postmark date of the Regional Director's determination letter.

(b) You have an additional 30 calendar days after the postmark of your written appeal to the Commissioner within which to submit any additional supporting information.

(c) The Regional Director's final determination will remain in effect until the Commissioner has reviewed your appeal and provided you with that decision, unless you specifically request a stay and a stay is granted by the Commissioner.

§429.36   May I appeal the Commissioner's decision?

(a) Yes, you may appeal the Commissioner's decision by writing to the Director, Office of Hearing and Appeals (OHA), U.S. Department of the Interior, 801 North Quincy Street, Arlington, Virginia 22203.

(b) For an appeal to be timely, OHA must receive your appeal within 30 calendar days from the date of mailing of the Commissioner's decision. Rules that govern appeals to OHA are found at part 4, subparts B and G, of this title.

(c) Notwithstanding the provisions of §4.21(a) of this title, the Commissioner's decision will take effect upon issuance and remain in effect unless you specifically request a stay and a stay is granted under §4.21(b) of this title.

§429.37   Does interest accrue on monies owed to the United States during my appeal process?

Except for any period in the appeal process during which a stay is then in effect, interest on any nonpayment or underpayment, as provided in §429.33(a), continues to accrue during an appeal of a Regional Director's final determination, an appeal of the Commissioner's decision to OHA, or during judicial review of final agency action.



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